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May 27, 1948 - Image 4

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tota

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TURSDAY, iMA Y27, 1948

I I

In Self Defense

THE STUDENT AFFAIRS Committee is to
be congratulated for the forward step it
Chas taken in revamping the process of rec-
ognizing student organizations. Although
the details of the changes have not yet been
announced, the fact that for the first time, a
process for the withdrawing of recognition
has been included in it, is indicative of the
good intentions and strong foundations of
the new system.
The method of withdrawing recognition
has long been a bone of contention among
the student organizations. Student groups
of all political color and all activities have
resented the fact that their activities could
be quickly curtailed, without, one might
say, resort to a court or judicial body.
The MYDA incident was a good example.
At that time the administration laid down
an ultimatum to the MYDA group, outlin-
ing certain things that the MYDA group
MUST do to remain on campus. The action
was taken without any noting of the fact
that MYDA as it then stood had been rec-
ognized. The move was without real prece-
dence.
Editorials published in The Michigan Daily
are written by members of The Daily slaff
and represent the views of the writers only.
NIGHT EDITOR: MARY STEIN

A legal process for withdrawing recogni-
tion will not act as a protection for any or-
ganization which has violated University
regulations. It will only mean that all or-
ganizations will be permitted the right to a
hearing before their privileges are taken
away from them. Certainly there can be
nothing wrong with hearing what a group
has to say in defense of itself. Our courts
have been doing it for years.
No power is being taken from the Ad-
ministration, either. As the SAC points
out, the University Officials have the im-
plicit right of veto over any University
group with delegated powers. This means
student groups as well as the SAC.
But the student body and the University
are moving towards an ideal goal. Gradually,
over the past two or three years, the signifi-
cance of student responsibility for what
happens in the University, the sharing of
the government of student actions with the
student body by the University, such as
through Men and Women's Judiciaries, the
Student Legislature, and the Inter-Frater-
nity Council has been impressed upon the
students.
The process is an entirely desirous one.
It is part of the realization that students
are, after all, maturing individuals who
should be taught HERE and not later, the
fundamental principles of self-government.
-Don McNeil

Electoral Problems

WITH ANOTHER NATIONAL election
up soon, it's an apt time to take
a hard look at the way we elect our Presi-
dents.
Under the present involved electoral-col-
lege system we vote for State electors, who
in turn through a highly technical proce-
dure, are pledged to vote for one of the
presidential candidates. Also all electoral
votes of any State go to the candidate re-
ceiving the largest share of the popular
vote in that State. Finally, the number of
electoral votes allotted to each State is
based on the total number of Representa-
tives and Senators sent by each to Wash-
ington.
Three principal evils spring from such
an election system:
1. Because all the electoral votes of a
State are cast in a bloc, candidates are
not necessarily elected on the basis of
popular vote. In the past, Adams, Hayes,
and Harrison slipped into the White
House with less popular backing than
their chief opponent. The victors were
merely fortunate enough to win by slim
popular margins in the large population
States. But slim popular margins are
enough to throw all the electoral votes of
the big States one way.
2. It is now as useless for a Republican
candidate to stump in the Democratic South
as it is for a Democratic candidate to cam-
paign in the red-hot Republican states of
New England. As the electoral votes of any
State are lumped together and presented to
only one candidate, the winning of twenty
or thirty per cent of the popular vote doesn't
accomplish anything. Consequently, presi-
dential candidates classify many States in
"safe" or "hopeless" categories and concen-
trate on winning the "doubtful" States-
States whose electoral votes could go to
anyone.
3. Because of their pivot position in the
"doubtful" States, third parties wield dis-
proportionate influence in these States. The

voting in a "doubtful" State is often close
enough to enable the backing of the third
party to be the deciding factor in determin-
ing which major party will receive the bloc
of electoral votes belonging to that State.
Aware of this, both major political parties
attempt to woo the third party vote in the
"doubtful" States.
To remedy the evils inherent in the
present voting set-up Senators Lodge and
Gossett have offered a constitutional
amendment that would abolish State elec-
tors and would allow the people to vote
directly for a presidential candidate. Most
important, under the amendment each
presidential aspirant would receive a share
of each State's electoral votes in propor-
tion to the popular vote cast for him.
The amendment would accomplish the
following:
1. Since the number of electoral votes in
every State would be split in proportion to
popular vote, no presidential candidate
would reach the White House with less pop-
ular backing than his chief opponent.
2. Every State would become a political
battleground. The concept of a "solid South"
or Republican mid-west would be outmoded.
It would be worth a candidate's time to
campaign everywhere, as every vote gained
would weigh on the electoral count.
3. The influence of the third party in
the "doubtful" States would no longer be
a commodity to be sold to the highest
bidder. If the popularity of both major
parties in any State were about equal,
the division of the electoral votes would
be about even, no matter which way the
third party threw its weight. Further-
more, a third party could become a po-
tent force simply on its ability to win
votes.
If the wish of the voter is the criterion
of electing our Presidents, the Lodge-Gos-
sett amendment should be adopted. The
present system of election is hardly demo-
cratic.
-George Riviere.

Humanities
W E ARE admittedly living in a scientific
world, and it seems that education has
lost its classical tendencies and is now pro-
gressing rapidly along scientific lines.
This year, in an attempt to possibly
curb this strong scientific trend or at least,
to influence the minds of new students
towards more liberal thinking, the Uni-
versity has incorporated into its curricu-
lum a new course, the Humanities, which
covers world literature from Homer to
Goethe.
The course has been introduced on a tem-
porary basis but everybody who has taken
Humanities is keenly aware of what inesti-
mnable value it has been to them. When the
faculty next year votes as to whether or not
the course should remain in the curriculum,
there can be but one answer . . . the course
must remain to acquaint even more students
with great world literature. Not only should
the course be available to freshmen, how-
ever, but upperclassmen as well should be
able to profit from the benefits of the Hu-
manities.
The course endeavors to present to the
students a conception of the world at its
various stages, through the literature of
these times. This year, the course in-
cluded Homer's Iliad, Virgil's Aeneid,
Dante's Divine Comedy, Milton's Paradise
Lost and Goethe' Faust. Excerpts from
Aristotle, Herodotus, Tacitus, Thucy-
dides, Shakespeare, Moliere and Cervantes
also were studied.
As this trial year approaches its close
many professors who are teaching the Hu-
manities are skeptical about its merits, be-
lieving that a single year is inadequate time
for suitable study of these books. Students
alike share this sentiment but there are few
of them who will not attest to the general
.benefit of taking such a course. Moreover, it
has created in a majority of the students an
appetite for more great literature.
John Mason Brown in a recent lecture
here stated that for every four books he
read, he tried to include something that was
really satisfying, something that presented
"food for thought." Certainly, the Humani-
ties is making such a presentation and on
this basis alone deserves an important place
in this world of scientific learning.
-Herb Rovner
IT SO hAPPENS
* Whose Bells?
After We're one.
0 UR FINALS are crowded together, but
this year we're rather happy about it
all. Seems as- though there's going to be a
carillonneur convention-recitals and all-
along towards the latter part of finals
week. . .
So Do We
( ASPING MADLY for fresh air in our two
hour lab, we listened to the carillon
chiming serenely in the distance. All of
which reminded us of a local item in a
New York newspaper last year at this time,
when Prof. Price went searching for the
bells in Europe. After a chatty interview on
the carillon business, the reporter thanked
Prof. Price and wished him "a bell of a
time."
Irregular
WE'RE ALL WORRYING about our term
papers anyway, but a friend of ours was
ready to give up when her phone rang, a
voice identified himself as her political sci-
ence professor and she was asked to report
to his office to discuss some "irregularities"
in her paper.
She spent a sorry half hour wondering
if she was destined to spend the summer
writing term papers until a hilarious

"buddy" admitted the hoax. We're not sure
this was funny.
** * '
But Who Isn't?
ONE DOCTORAL candidate we know was
hurriedly returning his thesis to the
printer, after searching frantically for a
lost hyphen.
A thoughtful linotypist had conveyed said
candidate's appreciation to "the 200 odd
students who participated in the experi-
ment."
What About Annie?
EXAMS GETTING ever closer, one coed,
anxiously in need of some pertinent in-
formation, skipped over to the phone at a
reasonable hour for the average student, 11
p.m.
The new Ann Arbor buzzer system worked
loud and long, but at last the receiver was
picked up. Before she had the chance to
coo a pleasant hello, an 11th hour voice
bellowed "You've got the wrong number,
no students live here, have lived here or ever
will live here !"
h J1

SECOND SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCIEDUILE
UJNIVERlSlTY oF IICHIGAN
COLLEGE OF LITERATLLRE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SC IIOOL Of' FORESTRY AND CONSERVATION
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
SCIOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
MAY 29-JUNE 10, 1948
Note: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the time
of exercise is the time of the first lecture period of the week:
for courses having quizzes only, the time of the exercise is the
time of the first quiz. Certain courses will be examined
at special periods as noted below the regular schedule. 12 o'clock
classes, 4 o'clock classes, 5 o'clock classes, and other "irregular"
classes may use any examination period provided there is no
conflict (or one with conflicts if the conflicts are arranged for
by the "irregular" class) In the College of Literature, Science,
and the Arts, instructors of "irregular" classes with 20 students
or less, most of whom are seniors (or graduating graduates),
may use the regular hours of the last week of classes for final
examinations if they wish. A final period on June 10 is available
for "irregular" classes which are unable to utilize an earlier
period.
All examinations of those expecting to receive a degree in
June must be completed not later than Saturday, June 5. It is
the responsibility of the instructor to arrange special examina-
tions, if necessary, for those students. In the College of Litera-
ture, Science, and the Arts, the times for special examinations
for those graduating in June for certain courses are indicated
below.
Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination. In the College of
Literature, Science, and the Arts, no date of examination may
be changed without the consent of the Committee on Examina-
tions. The graduating student should also check to see that
his examinations are to be completed by June 5.

I
I

i

Purblic ~,d n iThe DAIlyvOfficial
Buetc t t 0tall
theU .Notices
furth lBlleti hoLnti(be);"senlt is
-yewitte I orm tomtheofIce of the
Assst i t th Pe'dct.Room
11:003 00 p m
OiedayPI 'etilr pb~i~itio , IIV

Notices

4

THURSDAY, MAY 27, 1948
VOL. LVIII, No. 167
Plans for Commencement
('omnencement-Sat., June
5:00 ptm.

12,

TIME OF EXERCISE

TIME OF EXAMINATION

I

Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

at 8.
at 9.
at 10.
at 11.

.. ... ....Fri.,
.. Mon.,
.Sat.,
. ....... Tues.,

June
May
May
June

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Monday at 1.
Monday at 2.
Monday at 3.

..Thurs., June
..Wed., June
.. Sat., June

4,
31,
29,
1,
3,
2,
5,
31,
29,
1,
2,
4,
3,
5,

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
9-12

Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday

at 8.................
at 9 .................
at 10 .................
at 11.................

..........M on.,
...-....-..Sat.,
. .. .......Tues.,
.. Wed.,

May
May
June
June
June
June
June

at
at
at

1.................. ..- .
2 ......................
3......................

Fri.,
Thurs.,
Sat.,

Evening Classes, Seminars, and
Chem 21.................

. . ..

Mon., May 31, 7 p.m.
Thurs., June 10, 9-12

Irregular ..............................T
SPECIAL PERIODS

Ec. 51, 52, 53, 54, 102 ................
English 1, 2 .....................
Soc. 51, 54, 90....................
Bot. 1, Zool. 1 .....................
Chem. 1, 3, 4, Psych 31 ..............
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 31, 32, 61, 62,
91, 92; Speech 31, 32 ..............
German 1, 2, 31 ....................
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32.. .. .. .. .......
Pol. Sci. 1, 2 ......................

...Thurs., June

3, 2- 5

.Sat.,
Mon.,
Mon.,
..Tues.,
..... Tues.,
...Wed.,
..Wed.,

June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June

4'
5,
7,
7,
8,
8,
9,
9'

2- 5
9-12
9-12
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
9-12
2- 5

I'D RATHER BE RIGHT:
Why Not 'Appeasers?'

SPECIAL PERIODS FOR THOSE GRADUATING IN JUNE
Botany 1; Zoology 1; Psych 31...........Sat., May 29,7 p.m.
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 31, 32, 61, 62, 91, 92
German 1, 2, 31
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32 ...... ...........Tues., June 1, 7 p.m.
Speech 31, 32 .......................... Wed., June 2, 7 p.m.
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any neces-
sary changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
SCHOOL OF FORESTRY AND CONSERVATION
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any neces-
sary changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual Instruction in Applied Music.
Individual examinations by appointment will be given for
all applied music courses (individual instruction) elected for
credit in any unit of the University. For time and place of exam-
inations, see bulletin board of the School of Music.
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTII
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any neces-
sary changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
MAY 29 TO JUNE 10, 1948
NOTE: For courses having both lecture and quizzes, the
time of exercise is the time of the first lecture period of the
week; for courses having quizzes only, the time of exercise is
the time of the first quiz period.
Drawing and laboratory work may be continued through
the examination period in amount equal to that normally de-
voted to such work during one week.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted
below the regular schedule. All ca.ses of conflicts between as-
signed examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See bulletin board outside of Room 3036 East Engineering Build-
ing between May 12 and May 19 for instructions.
Seniors and graduates who expect to receive a degree this
June and whose examination occurs after June 5, should also
report to Room 3036 E.E. between May 12 and May 19.
To avoid misunderstandings and errors each student should
receive notification of the time and place of his appearance in
each course during the period May 29 to June 10.
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classification Committee.

ecp Weather Fair
Time of Assembly-3:55 p.m.
(xetnoted)
Places of Assembly
Members of the Faculties at 4:00
p.m. in A.H., Rm. 1223, Rhetoric
Library, where they may robe.
Regents, Ex-Regents, and Deans
at 4:00 p.m. in A.H., Rm. 1011, Re-
gents' Room.
Students of the various schools
and colleges, as follows:
Literature, Science and the Arts
on Main Diagonal walk between
Library and Eng. Bldgs
Education on walk in front of
Physiology and Pharmacology
Bldg.
Engineering on Main Diagonal
walk in Engineering Court.
Architecture on Main Diagonal
walk in Engineering Arch (behind
Engineers).
Medicine on Diagonal walk be-
tween Chem. Bldg. and Library.
Nursing on Diagonal walk be-
tween Chem. Bldg. and Library
(behind Medicine).
Law on East and West walk,
west of the intersection in front
of Library.
Pharmacy on East and West
walk, west of the intersection in
front of Library (behind Law).
Business Administration on
walk north side of Physiology and
Pharmacology Bldg.
Forest and Conservation on walk
north side of Physiology and
Pharmacology Bldg. (behind Bus.
Admrn.).
Music on diagonal walk from
Library to Alumni Memo. Hall,
near Library.
Public Health on diagonal walk
from Library to Alumni Memo.
Hall (behind Music).
Graduate on East and West
walk west of Library entrance.
Honor Guard at Waterman
Gym.
Line of March-State Street to
Ferry Field.
In case of rainy weather, the
march to Ferry Field will be aban-
doned. Members of the Faculties,
Regents, Deans, etc. will assemble
at the same places as for te fair
weather program. Graduates will
go direct to Yost Field House and
enter by the South door.
Return of University Keys
Anticipating the large number
of keys tobe returned to the key
office at the close of the present
semester, the Key Office, Plant
Service Bldg., will be open daily,
Mon. through Fri., 8 a.m.-12 and
1-5 p.m. from now until June 12.
Please return keys at the earliest
possible time to avoid last minute
confusion.
Automobile Regulations:
The following schedule will
govern the lifting of the Automo-
bile Regulations for students in
the various schools and colleges of
the University. Exceptions will not
be made for individuals who com-
plete their work in advance of the
last day of class examinations,
and all students will be required
to adhere strictly to this sched-
ule. The regulations will go back
into effect Ft 8 a.m. Mon., June 21,
the first day of summer session.
College of Literature, Science
and the Arts, June 10, 12 noon;
College of Engineering, June 10, 5
p.m.; Law School, June 4, 12 noon;
Medical School, June 4, 5 p.m.;
College of Architecture and De-
sign, June 10, 12 noon; School of
For-stry and Conservation, June
4, 12 noon; School of Music, June
10, 12 noon; College of Pharmacy,
June 4, 12 noon; School of Public
Hlealth, June 5, 12 noon; School of
Dentistry, June 4, 12 noon; School
of Education, June 10, 5 p.m.;
School of Business Administration,
June 8, 5 p.m.
Attention June Graduates: Col-
lege of Literature, Science, and

the Arts, School of Education,
School of Music, School of Public
Health:
Students are advised not to re-
quest grades of I or X in June.
When such grades are absolutely
imperative, the work must be
made up in time to allow your
instructor to report the make-up
grade not later than noon, June
7. Grades received after that time
may defer the student'stgradua-
tion until a later date.
Recommendations for Depart-
mental Iionars: Teaching de-
partments wishing to recommend
tentative June graduates from

posed field of concentration. If
that office does not have your
card, or if you did not list a spe-
cific field, your test results may
be obtained at the Office of the
Academic Counselors, 108 Mason
Hall.
College of L.S.A., Schools of Ed-
ucation and Music: Registration
material for the Summer Session
may now be obtained at the Reg-
istrar's Office, 4 University Hall.
Students now in residence present
student's receipt for identification.
College of Engineering: Stu-
dents enrolled for the current
term should call for Summer Term
registration material at Rm. 244,
W. Eng. Bldg., beginning Tues.,
June 1 through Fri., June 4 and
Mon., June 7, from 9 to 12 noon,
and 1:30 to 4:30 p.m.
Closing hours for Women's Resl-
dences:
1) Women students wishing to
be out of their houses overnight
during the final examination pe-
riod may arrange permission with
their house directors. Late permis-
sions, as distinguished from over-
night permission, will be handled
by the Office of the Dean of Wom-
en and will be granted only under
very unusual circumstances.
2) Women students other than
graduating seniors are expected to
be out of their houses not later
than 24 hours after their last ex-
aminations. Graduating seniors
are expected to leave by noon of
Sunday, June 13.
3) There will be no changes in
the closing hours for women's
houses with this exception:
Thursday, June 10, 12:30 a.m.
Notice to Employes enrolled in
Blue Cross Hospital Service Plan:
Effective with the June deduc-
tions from payroll, new rates for
the various plans will be estab-
lished as follows:
Hospital-Surgical Plan
With Ward Service
One Person $2.20; Two Persons
$5.10; Full Family $5.75.
With Semi-Private Service
One Person $2.50; Two Persons
$5.60; Full Family $6.25.
Hospital Plan Only
With Ward Service
One Person $1.50; Two Persons
$3.50.. Full Family $3.50
With Semi-Private Service
One Person $1.80; Two Persons
$4.00; Full Family $4.00.
The American Agricultural
Chemical Company, Detroit, will
have a representative at the Bu-
reau of Appointments Friday af-
ternoon, May 28, to interview men
preferably with a rural or' farm
background who are interested in
a salaried sales position. Call ex-
tension 371 for an appointment.
Students who entered the Hop-
wood Contests should call for their
manuscripts at the Hopwood
Room Fri. afternoon.
Members of the Faculties of
Graduate School, Public Health,
Dentistry, Pharmacy, Engineer-
ing, Education, Architecture, Bus-
inessAdministration, Forestry,
and Music:
In order to aid the faculty in re-
porting grades promptly, drop sta-
tions will be maintained during
the examination period. Any
grades for any school or college
may be left at any station and
proper distribution of the grade-
report forms will be made. These
stations are located as follows:
(Continued on Page 6)

A

'1

By SAMUEL GRAFTON
WHEN AN AMERICAN ventures the opin-
ion that perhaps we ought to discuss
peace with the Russians, he is more than
likely to be denounced as an appeaser. In
addition, the chances are good that he will
be talked down as a wishy-washy character,
lacking in backbone. If he has enough
standing, like a preacher or a teacher, so
that his critics are inclined to be charitable
about him, they may say that he is a man
possessed of noble ideals, of course, but
ideals that are perhaps a little too good for
this world.
If this is true of Americans who talk
peace, it ought maybe to be true of Rus-
sians who talk peace, too. The Russians
have made a couple of offers of peace
discussions during the last fortnight. But
the interesting thing is that we have not
dragged out our vocabulary about wishy-
washiness, appeasers, etc., to describe the
new Russian peace moves. We seem, if
anything, a little alarmed about them;
we speak of them as constituting a "peace
offensive."
The word "peace," which we consider
weak on American lips, rather startles us
when we hear it on Russian lips. Same
word. Yet nobody says, ah, that Stalin, he's
gone wishy-washy, no backbone any more,
an appeaser, yet; and certainly nobody
around here has remarked that he has

cided that this slogan is a weak one.
Nothing could have seemed much weaker
than the blank negatives with which we
met the Russian overtures, or our hasty
efforts to provide some sort of answer.
Whether these overtures were sincere or
not, they were stronger than our re-
sponses.
The plain truth is that in our day, in our
world, the slogan of peace can be wielded
like a sword, and we are led to the odd con-
clusion that the "tough" line may not be
nearly as tough as we like to think; it may
indeed be not very tough at all.
For peace is a policy; to raise the slo-
gan of peace is to offer to set the world
right; it is an offer to solve problems. As
against this, the "tough" line seems
merely feeble, for it bids the world to
wallow contentedly in its unsolved
problems for an indefinite number of
years; it invites mankind to build
arms, and then hope for the breaks;
it makes the confident prediction that our
futures will be insecure; it raises compli-
cated and unprosperous perspectives. It is,
in actuality, not a policy; it is only organ-
ized -doubt.
Perhaps we are wrong in our hasty deci-
sion that the cry for instant peace, which
rises so high in the hearts of all mankind,
is not fit to come from a he-man's lips. It
may make a louder and more positive noise
than we know Perhansp e o'rLiino +nn

Fifty-Eighth Year

1

Looking Back

TIME OF
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday

EXERCISE
(at 8.......
(at 9.......
(at 10.......
(at 11.......
(at 1.......
(at 2.......
(at 3.......

............ F ri., t
............ M on., I
............Sat., I
............ Tues., t
............ Thurs.,
............W ed.,
............Sat.,
............ M on., I
............ Sat., I
............ Tues.,
............W ed., r
.. . .. . . Fri.,
.Thurs.,
C' ,.4

June
May
May
June
June
June
June
May
May
June
June
June
June

4,
31,
29,
1,
3,
2,
5,
31,
29,
1,
2,
4,
3,
S

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
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TIME OF EXAMINATION

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41

1; -
From the pages of the Daily
Fifty years ago today:
A new branch of aquatic athletics was in-
augurated here with the organization of the
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