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May 19, 1948 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-05-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SIX

THE MTCHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY. MAY 19. 1&4R

---

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MOWN

TUMP SPEAKING:
Sigma Rho Tau To Hold
National Convention Here

By FREDI WINTERS
Sigma Rho Tau, engineering
Stump Speakers Society, will hold.
its 19th national convention Sat-
urday at the University, complete
with all the tradition that an-
nually marks the event.
The University's Alpha chapter
will act as hosts to delegates from
Tcledo University, the Detroit In-
stitute of Technology, and the
University of Detroit. Prof. R. B.
Morrison will welcome the Society
at the first session to be held at
10 a.m. Saturday. A business meet-
ing will follow.
Tung Oil Dinner
The Tung Oil banquet, to be
Van Passen To
Lecture here
On Palestine
Noted journalist and author,
Pierre van Passen, will deliver the
Henrietta Szold Lecture on
"America and Palestine" at 8 p.m.
Sunday in Hill Auditorium.
Van Passen, a world wide trav-
eller, has made several tours
through Arabic territories and has
visited Palestine seven times. He
has interviewed such notables as
King Ibn Saud, the Mufti, the
King of Egypt, and the Mfti of
Bagdad.
"The Forgotten Ally," published
in 1943, was written by van Passen
from his first-hand observation
and study of Palestine. It has been
acclaimed by critics as a modern
classic on the Palestine Problem
and the world Jewish question.
Among his other books are
"Earth Can Be Fair" and "Days of
Our Years."
The lecture is being sponsored
by B'nai B'rith, the Hillel founda-
tion, Intercollegiate Zionist Fed-
eration of America, Beth Israel
Sisterhood, and Hadassah.
Harvey Movie
To Be Shown
Pre-Meds To View
Circulation Film
A movie on William Harvey's
discovery of the circulation of
blood will highlight the Pre-Medi-
cal Society's meeting at 7:30 p.m.
tonight in Rm. 305 of the Union.
The film presents in dramatic
form an important turning point
in the history of medicine, which
greatly altered the medical view-
point held until the time of the
discovery.
Following the movie will be an
election for next year's officers,
which include the president, vice-
president, treasurer, secretary,
and publicity manager.
Also to be discussed will be the
plans for an advisory pamphlet,
which is to be based on a recent
poll of pre-medical students made
by the Society.
All pre-medical and medical
students were invited to attend
the meeting.

held at 6 p.m. Saturday in the
Union, will see the resurrection of
the "little bronze man." At one
time the metal statuette was
awarded an annual tour with the
chapter of Sigma Rho Tau which
won the national competition in
debating and public speaking.
But for many years now he has
been relegated to the memories of
old-time Stump Speakers. This
year's convention will see a new
"little bronze man," an exact rep-
lica of the original. Competition
for possession of the trophy is ex-
pected to be rugged.
Attorney Speaks
Daniel C. Wilkerson, patent at-
torney for General Motors Corpo-
ration will talk on "Preservation
of Human Speech" at the banquet.
Several faculty members will also
be called on to prake impromptu
speeches, "under fire" by the engi-
neers.
Another traditional award, the
Cooley Cane, will be presented to
the junior member of the organi-
zation who has contributed most
to helping the work of Sigma Rho
Tau.,
The cane, presented each year,
is a part of the original wooden
fence which sur ounded the cam-
pus at the close of the last century'
to keep cows from wandering
across the Diag.
Tickets for the banquet, which
is open to the public, may be ob-
tained from Art Pears at 2-7077,
Prof. Robert D. Brackett, Ext. 570,
or from any member of Sigma Rho
Tau.
Old Eli"".
(Continued from Page 1)
before collecting his two pounds
of hamburger in the kitchen.
He never bit a person in his 10
years in Ann Arbor, and never
fought with a dog smaller than
himself. Once in a fight, he'd
clamp his huge jaws around the
legs and hang on. One night the
Betas found the Chi Psi porter
beating Eli with a lead pipe, try-
ing to make him release his hold
on Moonshine Rum.
Eli's battle scars caught up with
him in his old age. He went blind
in one eye, several cuts refused to
heal, and the old fellow began to
be in great pain. The Betas knew
he'd have to be put to sleep and
reluctantly voted the move at a
special meeting.
Yesterday Eli slept out of his
misery leaving behind a legion
of admirers. A special plaque is
being planned which, in addition
to the rugged face with two ele-,
phant tusk teeth which appears
in 10 different Beta house pic-
tures, will keep alive the memory
of a dog who combined the best
of bulldog, gentleman, and devot-
ed friend.
Opera Committee
Will Meet Today
A final meeting of the semester
for student song and lyric writ-
ers working on the 1948 Union
Opera will be held at 7:15 p.m. to-
day in the Journalism newsroom
of Haven Hall.
Dave Leyshon, chairman of the
Opera Executive Council, de-
scribed progress made thus far on
Opera music as very favorable and
asked that all songwriters be on
hand for the meeting.
Leyshon also emphasized that a
rough draft of music or lyrics
now being written must be handed
in to him by each songwriter by
Saturday.

Hillel Campaign
The B'nai B'rith Hillel Founda-
tion is sponsoring an intensive
drive this month for supplies for
overseas survivors.
Discarded clothes, books, pen-
cils, pen, paper, and even leftover
bluebooks can be put to good use
overseas, leaders of the drive point
out.
Organized houses have been in-
structed to set up boxes for these
materials. Others may bring their
contributions directly to the Foun-
dation, 730 Haven St.

The
City Beat
An unnamed motorist discov-
ered yesterday that it really is
too near summer to be wearing
a furry collar to work.
Wnile driving down E. Delhi
Rd., he felt his neck gewg warm
and ticklish. Reaching back he
discovered a pet coon that must
have crept into his car during the
previous night.
So if your pet coon is missing,
contact Dr. H. R. Shipman, vet-
erinarian who has the animal.
Dogs aren't the only animals
that bite, Sheriff's officers
learned yesterday.
Charles Kline, 21, of 3315 Mc-
Comb Ave., East Ann Arbor, was
bitten by a rat; Monica Stevens,
26, of 324 E. Kingsley St., was
bitten by a stray cat; and a
University campus squirrel
nipped a grounds employe.
* * *
Ann Arbor police searched fruit-
lessly Monday night for a parking
meter head missing in the 100
block of W. Liberty.
A souvenir hunter or an irate
citizen was blamed for the theft.
The mechanism is valued at
$59.50.
Anderson Jackson, 20, a fug-
itive from an Alabama'prison,
was sentenced to eight to 15
years in prison yesterday on a
charge of assault with intent to
murder, by Washtenaw County
Circuit Court Judge James R.
Breakey, Jr.

By ROMA LIPSKY
Liberia, Africa's only indepen-
dent republic, is a scene of con-
flict between the old tribal cus-
toms and an encroaching west-
ern culture, according to Tom Mu-
TU' Smhony
Gives Concert
Women's Glee Club
Will Join in Program
The University of Michigan
Symphony Orchestra will present
its spring concert at 8:30 p.m. to-
morrow in Hill Auditorium.
The orchestra, composed of
more than one hundred students,
will be conducted by Wayne Dun-
lap in a program of Bach, Debussy,
and Brahms. The Women's Glee
Club under Marguerite Hood, will
assist in the Debussy selections.
Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach,
whose Concerto for Orchestra in D
Major will highlight the first part
of the program, is the son of Jo-
hann Sebastian Bach.
Three nocturnes by Debussy,
Nuages, Fetes, and Sirenes, will be
performed by the orchestra and
the forty-voice Women's Glee
Club.
The last selection of the pro-
gram is the Symphony No. 2 in D
Major by Johannes Brahms.

IN DARKEST AFRICA:
Native Customs and Western
Civilization Meet in Liberia

zik, research botanist, who has re-
cently returned from a long stay
in the dark continent.
The republic is now in a state
of unrest, he says, because of the
long range struggle for control
of the government between tribal
leaders tryin,,tomaintain rule
through thle old rites and customs,
and the Liberians educated in Eur-
ope and America who are advo-
cating a change to the ideas of
western civilization.
Older Than Egypt
The customs and religion prac-
tised by the various Liberian tribes
date back further than Egyptian
civilization. The medicine men,
tribal dances, and polytheism are
all very serious matters to the av-
erage Liberian.
The rubber industry in Liberia
is comparatively new, dating back
to 1926 when the first saplings
were imported from South Amer-
ica. Firestone at present has the
largest plantation, but the com-
pany does not own its land,
According to a prevailing law,
no outside investor can buy Liber-
ian property, but the government
has consented to grant leases for
a period up to ninety-nine years.
Five Years With Firestone
Muzik spent five years working
with the Research Department of
the Firestone Rubber Co. planta-
tion in Liberia. He has recently
returned to the University to or-
ganize the data gained in Liberia
into a thesis on rubber.

'1
'I

PIGS GO TO MARKET DESPITE STRIKE-Under watchful National Guardsmen, a drove of hogs
reach buying pens at strike-bound South St. Paul, Minn., stockyards. They were among the first
animals to reach the market in 10 days as a result of mass United Packing House Worker picket-
ing. A buyer, his white selecting cane upraised (center) is on hand to make his purchases.
VOTING REQUIREMENTS:
South Atlantic States List Regulations
Q

The Daily, in cooperation with the
Young Democrats organization, pre-
sents the first in a series of articles
on registration laws and voting re-
quirements in the 48 states, as a serv-
ice to the students of the University.
States are grouped according to re-
gions, with the exception of the
Middle Atlantic and Pacific states
which are grouped together to con-
serve space. All of the facts are sub-
ject to revision by state legislatures,
but are the most recent available.
SOUTH ATLANTIC: Delaware,
Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia,
North Carolina, South Carolina,
Georgia, Florida.
Delaware: To vote, a citizen
must have been a resident of the
State one year, of the county
three months, and of the election
district, 30 days. Tou must reg-
ister in PERSON during July 14
and October 16, and once each
week during April, May and June
before District Registrars. Supple-
mental registration days for Wil-
mington are held during years of
municipal elections from the first
Monday to the third Saturday of
April. Registration is permanent
unless cancelled for failure to vote
every 5 years.
Florida: A citizen must have re-
sided within the state one year
and the county 6 months. Regis-
tration must be made IN PER-
SON, with the County Supervisor
of Registration. In county offices,
registration is held 3 days a week
from August 2, until Election Day.
In the district, registration is held
2 days from September 6 to Oc-
tober 2, but UNREGISTERED
VOTERS MAY VOTE FOR FED-
ERAL OFFICES.
Georgia: A citizen must have
resided within the state for one
year, of the county six months
next preceding the election in
which he offers to vote. THE
MINIMUM VOTING AGE IS 18
IN Georgia. Registration must be
made IN PERSON with the Tax
Collector or Tax Commissioner in
Use Daily Classifieds

the county of residence four
months prior to the date of the
General Election or 5 days prior
to a special election. Registration
is permanent if the voter casts his
ballot at least once every 2 years.
Primary date not set.
Maryland: A citizen must have
been a resident of the state one
year, and of the county or city six
months. Registration is made
before the Board of Supervisors
of Election 10 days after any elec-
tion and closes 30 days before the
next election. In Baltimore, regis-
tration may be made at the office
of the Supervisors any day except
30 days before and 10 days follow-
ing a primary or special election
and 45 days before and 15 days
following a general election.
North Carolina: A citizen must
have been a resident of the State
one year and of the county and
precinct four months. Registra-
tion is permanent and must be
made IN PERSON before the pre-
cinct registrar during the two
weeks between the fourth Satur-
day before the election and the
second Saturday before the elec-
tions.
South Carojina: To vote, a cit-
izen must have been a resident
of the state two years, of the
county one year and of the pre-
cinct four months. POLL TAX of
$1.00 per year. You may register
IN PERSON the first Monday of
each month except during the
30 days prior to the general or
any special election. In counties of

over 50,000 registration is open
from August 1 to August 16 in the
General Election years. In Spar-
tanburg County, registration is
held from July 15 to August 15.
Virginia: A citizen must have
been a resident of the Common-
wealth one year, of the county,
city or town six months and of
the precinct 30 days. POLL TAX
OF $1.50 A YEAR MUST BE PAID
PRIOR TO MAY 1. A NEW VOT-
ER MUST PAY HIS POLL TAX
FOR THE PRECEDING 3 YEARS
UNLESS HE HAS JUST MOVED
INTO THE STATE OR COME OF
AGE. Registration IN PERSON
before the registrar in the county
of residence may be made any
time except the 30 days before an
election.
West Virginia: To vote, a cit-
izen must have resided within the
state for one year and the county
60 days. Registration may be
made IN PERSON OR BY MAIL.
Dates vary with the magisterial
districts, but may be made in the
Office of the Clerk of the Court
of the County of residence. Ab-
sentee registratiaon may be ef-
fected by application to the
County Clerk at any time except
the 30 days preceding an election.
13uiS/I ( [Sict er Terror
Students planning to attend the
business administration summer
school must classify with their ad-
visors in Rm. 108, Tappan Hall, by
the end of this week.

Xt//orr.4,&z...Smokers Report

J

For WEDDING and Q
.GRADUATION GIFTS
Or r
INDI AR T SHOP
, 330maynardSireet

ICampus
Calendar
Union Opera Songwriters-7:15
p.m. journalism newsroom, Haven
Hall. Final meeting of semester.
Radio.- 3:30 p.m., WKAR -
I)opwood Room; Toby David, disc
jockey, 6:15 p.m. WHRV.
Students Against Mundt Bill-
m pm., third floor, Union.
Pre-Medical Society-7:30 p.m.,
Rm. 305, Union. Movie on Har-
vey's discovery of circulation of
blood. Election officers.
American Society for Public
Administration-8 pan. West Con-
ference Rm., Rackham Building.
James M. Mitchell, Director of the
Civil Service Assembly of United
States and Canada, will speak.
Open to public.
State-"The Iron Curtain," 1, 3,
5, 7. 9 p.m.
Michigan--"Gentleman's Agree-
ment," 1, 3, 5, 7, 9.

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III 11i11

Pick yourself
a Rainbow in
Fiesta Lisle Panties
TRIG LITTLE JIGGER PANTIES OF LISLE
ARE THE BRIEF, HAPPY ANSWER TO
WHAT.TO WEAR IN SUMMER. SOFT,
COMFY, WITH SEAMLESS FRONT AND
BACK, THEY FIT SMOOTHLY UNDER
SLACKS OR SHORTS AND YOUR COOL..
SLIM-WAISTED COTTONS. IN WHITE
AND A WHOLE GAMUT OF PASTELS
SO PRETTY YOU'LL WANT 'EM ALL!
SMALL MEDIUM. LARGE. $1.00

BELIEVE ME
my short haircut
is cool and
easy- to-maniage

NO OTHER CIGARETTE
CAN MAKE THAT STATEMENT

i

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