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May 13, 1948 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-05-13

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PAOR six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THRSDAY, MAY 13, 1949

FOSTER PARENTS:
Campus Groups Adopt
European War Orphans

European war orphans are re-
ceiving a chance for another go
at a happy life through the ef-
forts of fraternities and dormi-
tories on campus.
Working through the Foster
Parents Plan for War Children,
Russel Award
Set forFriday
Professor Hobart H. Willard will
deliver the annual Henry Russel
Lecture at 4:15 p.m. Friday in the
Rackham Lecture Hall.
The recipient of the annual
Henry Russel Award will be an-
nouxnced at that time.
Prof. Willard will trace the de-
velopment of the science of ana-
lytical chemistry and its contri-
butions to such diverse fields as
medicine, agriculture, and in-
dustry.
President Alexander G. Ruth-
ven will introduce the lecturer and
will also present the award.
The cash prize, is assigned to
a younger member of the faculty,
either an instructor or an as-
sistant professor, whose scholarly
work is judged to have great
promise for the future.

Inc., Kappa Sigma, Phi Gamma
Delta and Martha Cook have each
adopted a war orphan and have
taken upon themselves the sup-
port of these children for an un-
specified amount of time.
Foster Parents is only one of
many organizations engaged in
rehabilitating Europe's war strick-
en youngsters.
Only $180 is required to sup-
port these children for a year.
Oganizations may specify the
age, sex and nationality of the
child they wish to adopt.
An 11 year old French lad, Rene
Terrisse, was adopted by Kappa
Sigma last month. Rene's history
is similar to thousands of other
European children who were vic-
tims of the German offensive.
His father was arrested by the
Gestapo because of his under-
ground activities and died in a
concentration camp.
Phi Gamma Delta is the foster
parent of an 11 year old Dutch
boy, Gerard Mielecamp. In addi-
tion to economic aid, the gifts and
letters from the fraternity have
brought much cheer to the little
Hollander.
Eva, a Czechoslovak, and a ward
of Martha Cook, is also one of the
fortunate recipients of American
care.

Students Will
Present Three
Plays Tonight
Three student directors will
present all-student casts at 8 p.m.
today as the speech department
sponsors a bill of one-act plays
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Earl Matthews will direct Har-
old Mers' "Guns Against the
Snow." Other plays are Maeter-
linck's "The Death of Tingatiles,"
directed by Betty Blomquist and
Chekov's "The Proposal," which
Sam Rich will direct.
There is no admission charge.
Doors will open at 7:15 p.m. and
close at 8 p.m. There will be no
admittance during performance
of any play.
The cast of "Guns Against the
Snow" includes Albert Nadeau,
George Crepeau, Shirley Loeblich,
Richard Charlton and Douglas
Anderson.
Acting in "The Death of Tin-
tagiles" are Ruth Frankenstein,
Marcella Kratt, Joyce Cregor, Wil-
liam Smith, June Goldberg, Pollee
Thomson and Anita Minor.
"The Proposal" will feature
James Lynch, Jeanette Grand-
staff and Richard Linden.
Students Going to
Europe Will Meet
A special NSA meeting for all
students who intend to go abroad
will be held at 7:30 p.m. today
in the Union.
The purpose of the meeting is
to provide an opportunity for all
those who will be in Europe this
summer to get acquainted.
A number of University students
will travel under the auspices of
NSA and many will be traveling
independently.

LADDIE WINS HIS LIFE IN COURT--Laddie, a two-year old
collie, on trial for his life in a Winsted, Conn., courtroom licks
the face of his owner, Miss Barbara Scanlon, as attorney Francis
P. Pallotti (extreme left) and Miss Ruth Donohue of the Dog
Welfare Association of Connecticut look on. The dog, charged
with being vicious and dangerous because it had bitten a news-
boy on the porch of the Scanlon home, was spared its life, but
sentenced to a life of confinement and close supervision by the
owner.
STUDENT STUNTS STOP:
Election Ruling Requires
Home Town.registration

Educator Asks
For Foreign
Scholarships
In Favor of Aid to
Exchange Students
A new government policy to
provide a larger number of schol-
arships and fellowships for for-
eign students in this country was
called for by Dr. B. K. Byram,
First Secretary and Educational
Liaison Officer of the Indian Em-
bassy.
Dr. Byram told the luncheon
session of the Conference on In-
ternational Student Exchanges
that there is too much "one sided-
ness" in student exchange be-
tween this country and India.
He pointed out that although
the United States is anxious to
have foreign students study in
this country, only ten per cent
of those now here are the recipi-
ents of government scholarships
and fellowships.
"It is necessary that America,
which has so much to offer the
world, should be able to give
many more scholarships and
fellowships to encourage these
people to come here to study, if
it is part of the educational pro-
gram of this country to encourage
foreign students to come here to
learn something of the American
way of life." he said.
The Indian government is
spending more than $2,000,000
a year on scholarships to this
country, Dr. Byram said.
The three-day student ex-
change conference ended yester-
day after electing officers to the
newly formed "National Associa-
tion, of Foreign Student Advisers."
Some of the officers elected
are: Prof. Clarence Linton, Co-
lumbia University, President;
Prof. Allen C. Blaisdell, Univer-
sity of California, Vice-President;
Harry H. Pierson, Institute of In-
ternational Education, Secretary
and Prof. Joe W. Neal, University
of Texas, Treasurer.
Elected to four year terms on
the Board of Directors were:sy
son M'. Gale of the University,
Paul M. Chalmers, Massachusetts
Institute of Technology, Troup
H. Mathews, Columbia University
and John A. Thompson, Louisiana
State University.
Car Shortage?
Not in the backyard of Wil-
low Run's gigantic automo-
bile plant. An order now
will insure delivery by the
time you leave for home.
STADIUM
MOTOR SALES
KAISER-sFRAZER DEALER
2500 Jackson Ave.
Ann Arbor, Michigan

Deans Explain Professional
Openings in Law, Dentistry

School Crowded
Chances for getting into thel
dental school next fall are notf
very good unless one is a Michigan:
resident with close to a B averager
in three years pre-dental work. 1
These facts were presented by
Dean Russell W. Bunting of the
Dental School yesterday in one of
the current series of advisory talks
on professional schools sponsored
by the literary college.t
Dean Russell explained that
only two years of pre-dental work
is required but that the current
flood of applications has forced 1
the dental school to favor those
with more.
"I would advise not specializing
in science in the pre-dental work.
We prefer the prospective dental
student to have a well-rounded
education instead," Dean Bunting
said.
In many of the years during
and before the war the dental
school was often little over half-
filled, the dean reported, but the
school had 2400 applications for
the coming year. Only 96 of the1
applications were accepted.

TYPEWRITERS
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G. I. Requisitions Accepted

Field at Peak
Opportunities in the legal pro-
fession are at their peak right
now, Dean Blythe Stason. of the
Law School, said yesterday.
Speaking on the legal profes-
sion in one of the series of profes-
sional talks, designed to help
students decide on their field of
concentration, Dean Stason went
on to explain that in future years
opportunities may not be as good
for graduating law students as
they are at the present time.
"I consider the qualifications for
a good lawer to be," Dean Stason
continued, "Good intellectual
equipment, good judgement, a
good personality, industry and in-
tegrity."

A GIFT!
Metal ~~
Stem Justsea
.' acoinside wrapper
Pipe } ram
HOLI DAY
PiPE MIXTURE
Mail to
.arns &iBro.Ce., Dept. RID
RicbmondV,
Swith your some 004
An
Adventure
in Good
~'Smoking

You and your friends are cordially invited to attend a
Free Public Lecture on Christian Science, entitled
Christian Science: God's Government
of Man and The Universe
by
Evelyn F. Heywood, C.S.B., of London, England
Member of the Board of Lectureship of The Mother Church,
The First Church of Christ, Scientist, in Boston, Massachusetts
in the
RACKHAM LECTURE HALL
Saturday, May 15, 1948, at 3:00 p.m.
Under the Auspices of
The Christian Science Organization at the
University of Michigan
ALL ARE WELCOME

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MUSICAL
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(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the second
in a series of three articles on regis-
tering for the coming presidential
election in November.)
By CRAIG WILSON
Students who register to vote
this November won't be able to
pull the stunt they contrived in
1893.
Back in those days, when Cuba
still nestled in the sovereign arm
of Spain, campus voters over ran
Ann Arbor ballot-casters. So the
Michigan State Legislature passed
a law forbidding University stu-
dents to vote in local elections be-
cause they elected "some of their
own number" to public offices.
Still Lingering
Today, the ruling still lingers.
Only students who live indepen-
dently here, and whose income is
derived from local employment
(self or wife) can vote in local
elections.
"But for the rest of the student
body, "No elector shall be deemed
to have gained or lost a resi-
dence by reason of his being a
student at any institution of
learning,' " Frederick C. Perry,
Ann Arbor City Clerk, quoted
from the Michigan Constitution,
(Article III, Sec. 2.)
Registering 'Tip'

I

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. .. _ . .

Sale

ballots, according to Clerk Perry.
Each scholar must appear to reg-
ister by August 25 for the Sept. 14
Primary or by Oct. 13 for the Nov.
2 Presidential Election. But it is
not necessary to register for both
or to vote in both.
Next: Why Ann Arbor voters
register and how the system
works.
The
City Beat
524 Thompson isn't 536 Thomp-
son - no matter how hard you
add, subtract, pound on the door
or argue with the tenants.
George Bush, 68, of 536 Thomp-
son was finally convinced of that
Tuesday when Municipal Court
Judge Jay H. Payne sentenced
him to 10 days in jail or $15.70 in
fines. Bush awoke the residents
of 524 Thompson at 2 a.m. with
his protestations.
Chelsea voters refused status of
a city in a special election Tues-
day by a margin of two votes: 237
to 235.
The Washtenaw County Board
of Supervisors approved vaccina-
tion on a compulsory basis for
all county dogs, effective June 1.
All persons applying for dog
licenses through the County Trea-
surer's office and from township
supervisors, must prove that the
animal has been treated for ra-
bies, the board decided.

- ..

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Enlarging again to better accommodate our customers.
We are offering these reductions to make room while installing
new equipment.

i

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Students must register
in their home-residence,
township, according to
Perry. And as a 'tip' he

to vote
city or
Clerk
warned

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SELECT GROUP OF

that this being a presidential elec-
tion year, there would be a great
number of voting re-registrants.
In Michigan, tuere is no chance
for students to vote by absentee
Campus
Calendar
H.M.S. Pinafore-Presented by
the Gilbert and Sullivan Society;
8 p.m. today, tomorrow, Saturday,
Pattengill Auditorium.
NSA-For all students who in-
tend to go abroad; 7:30 p.m.,
Union.
Young Democrats-Election of
Fall officers, 7:30 p.m., Rn1. 325,
Union.
P-T Vets Association-Meeting;
8 p.m., Athletic Director's Office,
YMCA, 110 N. Fourth Ave.
NSA Committee-Meeting, del-
egates to Madison and Committee
members; 4:15 p.m., Union.
Michigan-"State of the Un-
ion"; showing: 1, 3:30, 6, 8:50 p.m.
State-"A Double Life"; 1, 3:55,
6:10, 8:45 p.m.
IRA-7:30p.m. Union, discus-
sion of methods of combatting
discrimination.
American Ordnance Association
-Prof. W. G. Dow, "V-2 Bomb
in U.S., 8 p.m., Union.
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