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May 09, 1948 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-05-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TIlE MICIIGAN DAILY

~~JNiAY, MAY ~. t~.ig

Hopefu for
Ai(; ('Careers
Run Into Snag
Experience Needed
For Overseas Jobs
Most June graduates who plan
on starting their new careers
working for the American Mili-
tary Government overseas, will
run into the long-existent snag-
"experience necessary."
Some graduates, however, with
training in certain technical
fields, or in clerical or secretarial
work, will be eligible for over-
seas work immediately after grad-
uation, according to Miss Mar-
jorie E. Wycoff of the Army's Civ-
ilian Personnel Division.
Employees Need Change
Overseas personnel needs
change almost daily. Miss Wycoff
said. Graduates should inquire
about opportunities in their spe-
cific field from Mrs. Jeanne Nel-
son of the Overseas Affairs
Branch, Fifth Army Headquarters
in Chicago.
Miss Wycoff, who interviewed
teaching personnel at the Bureau
of Appointments recently, cited
several factors which tend to limit
job opportunities overseas for
June graduates:
Qualifications
1. Age limits are 21 to 35 for
women (21 to 40 in Japan).
2. Many positions are filled
from within the ranks of per-
sonnel already overseas.
3. The nature of the American
Military Government's program-
stabilizing business and govern-
ment--requires persons who are
experienced in highly technical
and highly professional fields such
as economics, statistics, and fi-
nance.
Primary Teachers Needed
Teaching positions in the
American dependents' schools in
Germany and Japan are much
more abundant, although these
positions also require experience.
Primary teachers particularly are
in demand, since half of the
American pupils enrolled in these
schools are in the first four
grades.
Mr. G. W. Orford, of the Eu-
ropean Command, said that
teachers in Germany often work

'OFF WE GO':
Helico pter Hats Rotate Over
Campus in Mass Movement

4

Hats were flying all over camp-
us yesterday-with the owners
right under them.
The nouveaux chapeaux, other-
wise known as "Helicopter Hats,"
landed on a local dimestore just in
time to make their debut at IFC
Ball Friday night.
The propeller-topped beanies
are also top-flight apparel for
casual wear, as shown by bleary-
eyed students who wore them to
Saturday classes. Their greatest
hope for fame, however, seems to
lie with the high-school crowd
that hit town yesterday for the
education conference.
Run on Hats
After the hats flew in on air ex-
press Friday, dimestore manager
R. E. Maten bedecked a few sales-
girls with the toy makers' answer
to' the revolving disk. From that
time on, the hats went like hot-
cakes and were sold out-Satur-
day noon.
"The high-school kids were
'Ensian Picnic
The 'Ensian staff will hold
its annual picnic Tuesday 3 to
9 p.m. on the Huron River
Island for all 'Ensian staff
members and those connected
with any other Student Pub-
lications Building staff.

just like sheep." Maten said. "\
few started wearing them, an(
then everybody had to have
them."
Rubber Dol Substitutes
Finding the hats sold out , lart-
shoppers consoled t h e m se 1 v e s
with another new toy, the "Weep-
ing Willie Balloons," thin rubber
dolls who queak when pinched.
All yesterday afternoon, content-
ed high-schoolers pinched their
dolls and glared enviously at the
revolving top-knots on lucky Heli-
copter Hat owners.
Dimestore employees are slowly
recovering this morning. "It was
like a three-ring circus 'around
here yesterday," Maten said.
"Dolls screeching, people being hit
by helium balloons an; idickic-
birds laoating through the store."
Wallace Tickets
Tickets for Henry Wallace's
speech in Detroit next Thursday
will go on sale Monday in the
Union.
They will not be sold on the
Diagonal, as announced earlier by
the Wallace Progressives.
If there is a sufficient demand
busses will be chartered to take
students to Detroit.

4

JEWISH PRISONERS GUARDED-Four Jewis h prisoners (center) are marched to headquarters
of Fawzi Bey Al Kaukji, Arab leader, after their capture in northern Palestine. Arabs said the Jews
were wearing Arab dress and would be tried as spies.

t.

GUILD
NEWS
New officers for Inter-Guild
elected at the Spring Retreat are:
Don Palmer, of Congregational-
Disciples Guild, president; John
Voltman, Lutheran Student Asso-
ciation, vice-president; Eva Glas-
ius, Canterbury Club, secretary;
Blaine Ingram, Canterbury Club,
treasurer.
*, * * .
Prof. Robert Smith, of the Du-
buque University philosophy .de-
partment, will speak at Michigan
Christian Fellowship at 4:30 p.m.
today in Lane Hall. His subject
will be "The Beginning of Wis-
dom."
Roger Williams Guild is
planning for next year's program
at their annual Spring Retreat
held this weekend at the Detroit
Recreation Camp. New guild of-
ficers are: Harold Carver, presi-
dent; Carol McCrady, vice-presi-
dent; Ralph Shively, treasurer;
and Mary Shawley, secretary.
'a-.
A panel of foreign students will
discuss "International Citizen-
ship" at the Wesleyan Guild at
5:30 p.m. today. Supper will
follow.
The Congregational - Disciples
Guild will meet for supper at 6
p.m. today at the Congregational
Church. Rev. Bryant Drake, na-
tional student director of the
Congregational-Christian Chuches
and Rev. John E. McCaw, stu-
dent work director of the Dis-
ciples of Christ, will meet with
the group.
The Grace Bible Guild will meet
for a cost supper at 6:15 today
in Fellowship Hall at the Church.
Wins Fellowship
Jean Gringle, '48, is one of 15
women college students in the na-
tion to win a Danforth Fellowship
for the coming scholastic year.
The fellowship carries a $1,000
stipend plus expenses to serve as
an assistant to campus religious
groups.

SECOND IN THE WORLD:
Chemical Engineers Return;
Mark School's 50th Birthday

On April 22. 1898 the regents
of the University approved the
creation of a department of
chemical engineering, the second
in the world-and yesterday, 50
years later, almost 200 alumni re-
turned to campus and joined in
commemorating the anniversary.
The program for the returning
alumni included an open house
Saturday morning in the depart-
ment of metallurgical engineer-
ing, and a luncheon at the Union.
Prof. Alfred H. White, one of the
original faculty members of the
chemical engineering department,
presided .at the luncheon.
He sketched the history of the
department which grew from the
demand for combination of the
two fields of chemistry and en-
gineering. Prof. White introduced
two distinguished alumni, E. C.
Sullivan, Honorary Vice-Chair-
man of the Corning Glass Works.
who spoke on "Before the Days
of Chemical Engineering," and S.
D. Kirkpatrick, editor of the
"Chemical Engineering Journal,"
who discussed "The University's
Position in our Advancing Tech-
nology."
An open meeting at 4 p.m. in
the Architecture Auditorium fol-
lowed by a tea ended the official
French Club Will
Honor Play Cast
Le Cercle Francais will hold its
last meeting of the year at 8 p.m.
Tuesday in the Assembly Hall of
R~ackham.
There will be a reception hon-
oring the cast of "Les Corbeaux"
and all who worked on the play.
Prof. Walter Patterson will add-
ress the club, and Mrs. Helene
Yaeger and Mrs. Liliane Love-
land, French war brides, will pre-
sent a French comedy.
The meeting will conclude with
a French quartet and trio, group
singing and refreshments.

business of the reunion. President
Alexander G. Ruthven welcomed
the assemblage and Prof. George
G. Brown presided at the meet-
ing.
Dr. Willard H. Dow, '19E, presi-
dent of Dow Chemical Co. spoke
on "Chemical Engineering's Di-
mensions." According to Dr. Dow,
who received his doctorate at the
University in 1941, 50 years ago
a career in chemical engineering
was considered a little more fan-
tastic than interplanetary travel
is thought today.
Prof. George G. Brown told of
new philosophies used in teach-
ing engineering, especially in the'
senior year. He said that one of
the main difficulties encountered
by engineers just out of college
is their lack of adjustment to in-
dustrial working conditions.
Campus
CIalenda r
EVENTS TODAY
Gallery Talk - "Twenty - five
Water Color Paintings of John
Marin," Prof. Jean Paul Slusser,
3:30 p.m., University Museum.
Religion Talk-Lecture by Rev.
John McCaw on "Crusade for a
Christian World," 11 a.m., Me-
morial Christian Church.
Carillon Recital-Seventh pro-
gram of current series by Percival
Price, University Carilloneur, 2:15
p.m.
State Theatre-"A Double Life,"
1, 3, 5, 7, 9 p.m.
Michigan Theatre - "State of
the Union," 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 p.m.
EVENTS TOMORROW
Civil Liberties Meeting-Stu-
dent meeting to discuss Mundt
Bill, 4:15 p.m., Union (third
floor.)

F ILMS
and f
PHOTO-FINISHING
We carry film that will fit your camera. Have your
pictures developed and printed at our shop.
BOYCE PHOTOCOu.4
723 North Universitya
""""><""":>0< )> <""> r"" > <c ) )2"">c- r) 0

in an
many
held

informal
of these
in regular

atmosphere since
schools are not
school buildings.

I.

"..."..--

1-

The Ship
Is In!
+.M.S. PINAFORE
May 13-14-15

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mommmommom

I

MOTHER

"s DAY

Sign up today with

F

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TT' S

STATE STREET AT NORTH UNIVERSITY

/I

IDIININER
(CHoICE or ONE)
Chicken Mulligatawney Soup
Chilled Tomato Juice or Grapefruit Juice
Fresh Shrimp Cocktail
Relishes
Three Dollars
BROILED SPECIAL SIRLOIN STEAK
Two Dollars, Fifty Cents
BROILED FILET MIGNON
WHOLE BROILED LIVE LOBSTER-DRAWN BUTTER
JUMBO FROG LEGS - MAITRE d'HOTEL
ROAST TURKEY-DRESSING-CRANBERRY SAUCE
BAKED HAM - FRUIT SAUCE
ROAST PRIME RIBS O FBEEF - ,AU JUS
ROAST CHICKEN - CELERY DRESSING
Mashed or Julienne Potatoes
Fresh Buttered Baby Lima Beans
and
Spring Co-mbination Salad

11

Q FINAL CLEARANCE
on New Spring Merchandise
Spring Dresses .......Values to $50 Now $5 and $10
Spring Coats ........ Values to $60 ...... Now $40
Blouses .............Values to $15 .......Now $3
Pajamas (Jersey and Cotton)
. .. . . . ...........Values to $9 .. Now$Zand$3
Pure Silk Wire Bras (Strap and
Strapless).......Values to $8 ........ Now $3
Taffeta Petticoats . .. . Values to $7 ........ Now $5
Handbags........... Values to $50 .. Now $5to $20
O Spring Hats .........Values to $25 .. Now$2 to $10

U-ITH

13

1hE BEAUTIfUL FIT
and iWTbte 0
t O*
Look, Oh look at our prlYnwiseth
oh lookvery 194$,
simmerVines,he ya en
tigher, nine fornow ad
- e new look of spring.
al,summer ong

+.

I

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Pineapple Upsidedown Cake
Sweetheart Pie

Fresh Stra
Butterscotch

zxberry Sundae or
or Chocolate Sundae
Angel Sandwich
Home-Made Pie
Tea

Parfait
or Parfait
Milk

Coffee

Blue
and Wnte

...... ..... . ..

ASSORTED FRUITS, NUTS AND MINTS

F

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II 1

xl

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