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May 05, 1948 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-05-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WNSDAY, MAY a, 1948

I

liskey Heads Huge 'I-M Set-Up

By PRES HOLMES
A nationwide comic-strip has
been concerned lately with a uni-
que, multi-armed statuette, but
this imaginative being is reduced
to insignificance by a certain
human down at the IM building.
The sedulous individual refer-
red to is Mr. Earl Riskey. Com-
plete charge of setting up and
keeping in operation an efficient,
extensive, and satisfactory pro-
gram of intramural sports is his
task; and to successfully accom-
plish this work takes more than
an average human being.
Tremendous Job!
The Job which falls on his
shoulders is a tremendous one.
For instance: there are twelve
separate and distinct divisions of
Intramurals. Pick one of these,
the fraternity for example, and
one finds that it is subdivided
into 37 different teams which
participate in 21 various sports
throughout the year. Multiply
times twelve and try to stay sane.
The immense size which the
IM program has reached is due,
to a large extent, to the fact
that Michigan possesses a separ-
ate building which is devoted sole-
ly to Intramural sports.
Mihigan Only One
Michigan is the only school in
the country with such a set up.
In most schools the facilities are
shared by varsity sports, and by
the physical education and intra-
mural programs, which does not
give IM athletes the necessary
materials and equipment to make
an IM program successful or bene-
ficial.
Michigan's building was open-
ed in 1928 to provide a place for
IM sports which had existed
rather haphazardly for 14 years
at various places around campus
prior to this time. Mr. Riskey has
been associated with the program
since the opening of the building,
but has been director for only
the last five years.
Nine-Man Staff
A staff of nine men aid Mr.
Riskey in the operation of the IM
program. On his first right hand
he finds the able assistance of
Henry Lasch. Along with his' As-
sistant Director duties Hank also
has charge of the Residence Hall

English Honors.
Programs Bids
Due May_10
Seniors May Apply
For Tutorial Course
There's still one English course
in the curriculum that hasn't been
hit by overcrowding-English 197
and 198, the Honors Course for
seniors.
A limited number of qualified
students are accepted each year
for the course, which offers a
comprehensive study of English
literature from the Renaissance
to the present.
One of the few undergraduate
courses to be conducted on a sem-
inar basis, English 197 also fea-
tures a one-hour weekly confer-
ence between each student and
the special tutor to which he has
been assigned.
Invaluable Stimulus
The Honors Course demand; aI
great deal of time and indepen-I
dent initiative on the student's1
part, but is an invaluable stimulus
to his creative thinking.
Reading assignments are bi-
weekly, each one dealing with a
different literary period or type.
Members of the class are expected
to write a paper every two weeks
on an assigned topic pertaining to
the material which the group is
studying at that time.
competed this year in one or more
of the ten scheduled events.
Cliff Wise, in charge of the fac-
ulty division; Earl Katz, adminis-
trator of the International Center
sports activities; and Bill Nuse,
responsible for the All-Campus
branch; round out the staff of the
Intramural Sports Department.
The faculty division consists of
nine sports, and an undesignated
number of teams. The amount of
interest and enthusiasm deter-
mines the number of participants.
International Center
International Center sports are
comprised solely of students from
foreign countries. An interesting
note about this league is that it
is the only one which fields soccer
teams. This game has never quite
taken hold with the other divi-
sions on campus, but it is stand-
ard equipment in this league.
The All-Campus division con,-
sists of 23 different individual
tournaments which take place at
various times throughout the year.
Competition is limited to under-
graduates only.
The five remaining divisions of
Intramurals are Graduate, Co-
Recreational, Informal, Willow
Village and Instruction.

CAMPUS CAMPAIGN:
Volunteers Start Collection
To Aid UN Chldren's Appeal

The University's part of the In-
ternational Children's Crusade to
aid starving children in war-dev-
asted areas will get underway to-
day when a squad of volunteer
workers from all branches of the
University begin an extensive can-
vass of all personnel.
These local canvassers represent
the United National Appeal for
Children which is supported by
26 cooperating relief agencies;
46 UN Countries are now partici-
pating.
Funds collected will be dis-
tributed by the International
Children's Emergency Fund to
as many of the ragged, starving
children as the funds will cover.
Latest estimates of the world's
needy child population put the
total at nearly 230 million.
George A. Burke, Sr., local at-
torney and former Nuremberg war
crimes trial judge who has seen
European conditions first-hand,
declared, "I saw the children dur-
ing the worst part of winter in
bare feet and rags, standing at the
entrances to PX's and commis-
saries. These boys and girls sel-
dom begged in the actual sense of
the word, but you couldn't mistake
the look in their eyes."
"Ill-clothed, hungry and sick
children create a poor background
Cold Room...
(Continued from Page 1)
The room is also used by the
chemical and mechanical engi-
neering departments to determine
the behavior of machinery at low
temperatures. At present the tem-
perature is kept at zero for special
work with small pieces of ma-
chinery.
Snow Mechanics
The Engineering Research In-
stitute is now considering the pos-
sibility of experimenting in a new
field of investigation and develop-
ment, snow mechanics, Prof. Hou-
sel said.
If the project goes through, the
cold room will come into extensive
use in testing physical properties
of snow under temperature
changes.
April hasn't always been the
fourth month of the year. The
earliest known Roman calendar
had a year ten months long, ac-
cording to the World Book Ency-
clopedia, and placed Aprilis after
Martius, then the first month.

for good citizenship here or
abroad,' Burke emphasized. "The
children need our help."

Principal Says
Pupil Slapping
Not Shocking
Letting teachers spank pupils
is a bad practice, but the furor
raised by newspapers over the re-
cent okay of spanking is surpris-
ing, according to Prof. G. Max
Wingo, principal of the University
Elementary School.
"In the majority of states,
teachers are still allowed to spank
children, in their school-hour sta-
tus as parent," Prof. Wingo said.
"The Detroit school system's de-
cision is nothing spectacular."
In a statement issued Saturday,
a deputy Detroit school superin-
tendent opened the way to spank-
ing unruly pupils, with the warn-
ing, "Don't do it unless you're
right."
Prof. Wingo called bodily pun-
ishment of pupils a crude way
of training children, to which good
teachers don't need to resort.
As a way to avoid scare tactics,
Prof. Wingo said that teachers
should arrange an interesting,
worthwhile program and bring
about good relation among teach-
ers and pupils.
"The best thing for school chil-
dren is a friendly relationship,"
Prof. Wingo said.
Justice Frank Murphy, of the
United States Supreme Court, has
been invited to sit on the bench,
and plans to do so if his Supreme
Court duties will permit a leave
of absence, according to Mike
Hindert, presiding judge of the
Case Club.

I

Symbol of Europe's Needy ...
WVPAG To Broadcast
The first of a new weekly series
of gardening programs will be
heard at 5:45 p.m. (DST) today
over WPAG.
Sponsored by the University
Broadcasting Service, the program
will offer hints on home garden-
ing and care of grounds. Lenore
Thompson Bingley, who teaches
an Extension Service gardening
course, will conduct the broad-
casts.

IM STAFF-Left to right, back row: Cliff Wise, Bill Nuse, Bill Donnelly, and Roy MacMurray.
Front row: Charles Orwick, Earl Riskey, and Frank Wardley.
* * *

This division consists of eight-

' Two more arms are filled by

een teams who try their hand at
twenty sports throughout the year.
These eighteen teams are split
into two leagues of nine teams
each, in effect, the West Quad
versus the East Quad. Fletcher
Hall makes the ninth team in the
West Quad league, and Vaughn
House completes the list in the
East Quad circuit, since there are
only eight houses in each Quad,
Competition in all sports is
conducted separately and then
championships are played off be-
tween the two groups.
Riskey Assistant
Roy MacMurray acts as Mr.
Riskey's first- left-hand man by
assisting him in the administra-
tion and operation of the social

G
t
.
r
i
I

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Charles Orwick and Frank Ward-
ley. Orwick is in charge of the
IM office, and Wardley acts as
field superintendent-securing re-
ferees, fields, and attending to
other details.
Another pair of able assistants
are Bill Donnelly and George Cal-
kins. Donnelly is in charge of the
Independent league, and Calkins
guides the professional fraternity
division along with his position
as one of the two senior managers.
Tom Dodson is the other senior
manager, and Hector Christian-
sen and Donald Kane are the
junior managers. The managers
handle tournaments, notices, re-
cords, and other office duties.
Independent League
The Independent league is at
present comprised of 24 teams
with a schedule of thirteen events.
Any individual may organize a
team in this division which has
been set up to give an opportunity
to non-fraternity men and those
not living in Residence Halls a
chance to copete in team sports.
The professional fraternity di-
vision shows that 18 teams have
Honors students take an oral
final at the end of the first se-
mester's study. The exam at the
end of the second semester in-
cludes an oral and a written com-
prehensive test on the whole year's
work. A term paper is also re-
quired for the course.
Personal Instruction
The reward for ill this effort
are the excelent reading and
thinking habits which the course
develops in the student. It also
helps him to sense the dominant
trends and ideas of the different
Fraternity To
Hold Rushing
Tau Delta Phi, newly reactivat-
ed fraternity will hold an open
house for prospective rushees at
7:30 p. m., today, in Rm. 316, of
the Union,
A national social fraternity
which was founded in 1919, the
campus chapter, Nu, was estab-
lished in 1922, and was deactivat-
ed in 1930.
The new campus chapter was
begun two months ago.
Students interested in rushing
Tau Delta Phi will not need to
register with the Inter-Fraternity
Council since the group is not yet
a member of the IFC.
Officers of the fraternity in-
elude at present, Mert Segel, as
President; Herbert Balin, Secre-
tary; Eugene Paul, Corresponding
Secretary; and Morton Weisman,
Treasurer.

literary periods and types, and is
an invaluable training for grad-
uate study.
According to this year's honor
students, the best thing about the
course is its personal method of
instruction. Close contact with
their teachers is much more stim-
ulating to their . own creative
thinking, they say.
Juniors interested in taking the
Honors Course in the fall should
submit written applications to
Prof. Karl Litzenberg before May
10.
Nurses Study
Public Health
Eight University School of Nurs-
ing students have started a six-
month course in public health
nursing with visiting nurse or-
ganizations in New York and De-
troit.
Upon completion of the train-
ing in October five of the stu-
dents, all seniors, will receive
diplomas in nursing and three
degrees of Bachelor of Science
in Nursing. Students who enter
the School of Nursing directly
from high school earn diplomas,
while those who enter after two
years of college get degrees.
'Triangle Initiates
Junior Engineers
Triangles, junior engineering
honor society, initiated 10 men
last night.
The newly-initiated members,
chosen primarily for their out-
standing participation in extra-
curricular activities and high
scholastic standing, are:
Robert N. Clark, Donald S.
Cleveland, Roger E. DeMeritt,
Peter C. Dendrinos, Harold D.
Evans, Folke G. Lundgard, Don-
ald B. McIntosh, Mack E. Suprun-
owicz, Walter H. Teninga and
William R. Upthegrove.

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