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May 04, 1948 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-05-04

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11alui

War Crin
DREW PEARSON reports in his column of
April 30, 1948, that Secretary of the
Army Kenneth Royall testified that "the
prime objective we have in Germany is to
build up a strong Germany both politically
and industrially," and that the stopping of
War Crimes trials would not be "terribly
serious."
Now, if Drew Pearson quotes Royall
correctly, and the Congressional Record
should show that, the first thought that
comes to our mind is that Royall cannot
wait to see another war.-Because such
an attitude is just about the surest way
to prepare the groundwork for another
war. It is the surest way of alienating all
democratic elements of Europe and of
attracting militarists and nationalists who
see their salvation in a Fourth Reich and
a renewed conquest of Europe.
It is also helping the Communists, as
millions of politically moderate Europeans
can think of nothing worse than Fascism
and the terrors of a German occupation. A
politically strong Germany would force them
to unite under the banner of hated Com-
munism, which would still be preferable to
a military Fascism. Western Europe has
never had Communist governments, but
those countries have not yet recovered from
the years of Nazi power, and Communism
to many is the lesser evil of the two.
Secretary Royall testified that he was in
favor of stopping all War Crimes trials
Editorials published in The Michigan Daily
Ore written by members of The Daily staff
and represent the Views of the writers only.
NIGHT EDITOR: ARTHUR HIGBEE

ies irial
as early as last August, but that Gen.
Clay persuaded him to let the cases that
were already being tried continue.
Up to now, the War Crimes trials in Ger-
many and Japan have been our only con-
crete accomplishments in the direction of
world peace. They have showed that inter-
national criminals can be held responsible
for their misdeeds and brought to trial like
ordinary murderers, and convicted by fair
and dispassionate methods. Future aggres-
sors may well think twice before attacking
if they know that diplomatic immunity or
the myth of "acting under orders" won't
save them from the gallows.
The prosecution of War criminals was
agreed on by Roosevelt, Churchill and Stalin
and should be carried on as long as one war
criminal remains untried. Most of the major
criminals have been tried, and it is too much
to hope that some of the "respectable" in-
dustrialists whose dirty work was done by
the their underlings will be convicted, but
our policy must not be repudiated, in the
interest of justice and future peace.
It is folly to let Germany become polit-
ically strong in the near future. Incidents
show that anti-democratic forces there are
becoming more powerful. German officials
trying to rebuild a democratic Germany are
considered collaborators and traitors by
their compatriots, and it is anybody's guess
whether and when such aftermaths of World
War I as the Freikorps and the waves of
political murders will reappear. How can
we expect to make Germany politically
strong (which would force Military Govern-
ment out of the picture and pave the way
for a reactionary regime) before we make
Democracy strong in the three Western
Zones?

-John Neufeld.
Children's Revolution

ARISE ye members of the lower age group,
the time of resistance has come! Long
enough have we been subject to the merci-
less persecution of the upper and middle
age groups. Too long have we tolerated
the totalitarian abuse of our innocence. The
UN Knowhow
MANY PEOPLE are disappointed in the
lack of success of the United Nations.
Somehow, they vaguely feel that the ma-
chinery wasn't set up properly or that some-
body put sand on its bearings rather than
oil. Their reasons for dismissing the United
Nations are as weak. as that.
It is for students who do not understand
the workings of the UN and those who
want to know more about our current hope
for peace, that a "Model" United Nations
is being organized tonight on campus.
The new group will form a government
organization just like the real UN at Lake
Success-Security Council, General Assem-
bly and committees. Students will partici-
pate by taking the positions of delegates
from each of UN nations. The problems of
setting up and operating a UN organization
will be attacked vitally. The viewpoints of
all nations will be represented fairly and
adequately, just as it was done in a success-
ful "Model" General Assembly conducted in
the Rackham Amphitheatre April 21.
The official organization meeting will be
held at 7:30 p.m. today, in the International
Center.
-Craig H. Wilson.

time has come for us to combat the forces
of our oppression.
Since the time of man, the younger mem-
bers of the group - from the weak, de-
fenseless five year old, to the innocent four-
teen year old adolescent - have been pum-
melled from pillar to post. We have been
brow beaten, and behind beaten. And now,
the last hairbrush has fallen.
This May Day, the Superintendent of the
Detroit schools, Mr. Arthur Dondineau, an-
nounced that the teacher can now slap de-
fenseless little children around. The adult
class has banded together and ended twen-
ty-five years of peace in the classroom. The
principal, and the State superintendent, Dr.
Detroit superintendent will reinforce the
princpal, and the State superintendent, Dr.
Eugene B. Elliot, has agreed to the action.
Who is to decide when it is necessary to
apply "corporal punishment" to the pupil-
child? Why, the adult teacher, of course.
It is a veritable conspiracy!
An example of the judgment of the adult
is shown in the situation which caused this
catastrophe. What started the whole thing?
A little, innocent, ten year old boy pulled a
girl's hair. Now we all know that little girls
are fully capable of taking care of them-
selves. The report doesn't even mention
any complaint from the little girl. Yet the
teacher hit the boy. This is a clear-cut case
of adult interference in child relations. This
is persecution.
Let the children of the world unite. "Jun-
ior" for President, and Red Skelton for Post-
master General!
-Phoebe Feldman

I'D RATHER BE RIGHT:
Capricious Policy
BY SAMUEL GRAFTON
SOMETIMES I get the feeling that domi-
nant American opinnion (and you can
picture it as either in government or out)
is being rather capricious as regards for-
eign policy. Sometimes, in fact, I even have
the outrageous thought that it doesn't quite
know what it wants.
You take the U.N.; in certain moods Amer-
ican opinion would like to see the U.N. vast-
ly strengthened as an instrument of control
against aggression, meaning aggression by
you know who. Talks are continually des-
cribed as going forward with this end in
view; the United States is pictured as on the
verge of demanding the reform of U.N.,
with the veto power removed, so that it can
act, don't you see, act
But much the same segment of Ameri-
can opinion also cherishes Arab friendship
ship and perhaps Arab oil, and on this
question it seems to desire a UN which will
roar you as gently as any suckling dove,
as 'twere any nightingal
We are throwing away U.N. prestige and
power by double handfuls on the Palestine
question, and we are demanding that both
be built up vastly on the Russian question.
We want the strongest, weakest U.N. you
ever saw; we want to be able to proceed
against Russia, even in the face of its
veto, and we don't seem at all to want to
proceed against Arab disruption, even when
we have a majority and when nobody has
vetoed anything.
To jump to what may seem an unrelated
subject, but isn't, we show some of the same
ambiguity with regard to strengthening
Western Europe. As on the question of
strengthening U.N., here, too, a note which
can only be described as capricious creeps
in.
On the one hand we would like to see
Western Europe vastly strengthened, and
we have evolved a costly Marshall Plan to
do same; the idea is not to set up a mere
breadline, but to give Western Europe the
tools it needs to make its living, and to
stand as an independent force against Rus-
sia. But on the other hand, there is feeling
against sending too much of our machinery
to Western Europe, and there are reports
of pressure on the State Department to re-
vise its machinery exports downward, and
its food exports upward.
A row seems to be starting in the House
over a proposal to send $122,100,000 of ag-
ricultural machinery abroad, and another
row threatens over a possible newsprint
shipment. If this pattern of protest be-
comes established, we are likely to see Mr.
Paul G. Hoffman, head of European aid,
called before a Congressional committee
whenever he plans to ship anything abroad
that some in America, might want to
use. That would be enough to make a
man jumpy.
At bottom, it all seems to be a question
of doubt, doubt as to whether we ought
really to trust in other agencies, from U.N.
to Western Europe, to keep us secure, or
whether we just ought to gather up Arab
oil and keep our machinery, and go it more
or less alone. We dramatize these doubts,
in constantly shifting trends and tenden'-
cies, and the result is a certain overall
confusion, not to say dismay.
It seems to me that, in this setting, the
man who feels that the way out lies in a
simple, direct search for peace and agree-
ment shows up as a secure, precise and prac-
tical sort of fellow. He, at least, is saved
from some of the dreadful dichotomies of
our times.
(Copyright, 1948, New York Post Corporation)
Current Moviesj

At the Michigan...
"TO THE ENDS OF THE EARTH," with
Dick Powell, Signe Hasso and Maylia.
This film is so good it might almost be
classed as a documentary on the activities
of the federal narcotics bureau in tracking
down dope smugglers. The plot is drawn
from the bureau files with the permission
of the treasury department, and deals with
the attempts of opium smugglers to get
drugs into the United States.
Dick Powell plays the role of the federal
agent who goes all over the world following
the trail of five million dollars worth of
opium. The story is done in part by narra-
tion, part by diagrams, and includes some
fine photography, excellent character por-
trayals and no heart throbs. Should be seen
only from the beginning. Buggs Bunny fin-
ally gets into a situation no screenwriter
could get hm out of.
-T. A. Hunter
At the State .. .
MAGIC TOWN, James Stewart, Jane Wy-
man.
JIMMY STEWART shines in this film,
which is typical of the nation-jarring
type of plot invariably assigned him. Wear-
ing the familiar drab suit and black hat, he
displays the subtle, rich humor which has
become personalized as his own.
The story concerns a young veteran who
has big ideas about how public opinion
polls should be taken. He finds the "mathe-
matical miracle"-a town which is com-
pletely typical of the entire country. It goes
smoothly at first, but then the conflicts

SECOND SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
COLLEGE OFLITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND Till, AICTS
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF FORESTRY AND CONSERVATION
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
MAY 29-JUNE 10, 1948
Note: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the time
of exercise is the time of the first lecture period of the week;
for courses having quizzes only, the time of the exercise is the
time of the first quiz. Certain courses will be examined
at special periods as noted below the regular schedule. 12 o'clock
classes, 4 o'clock classes, 5 o'clock classes, and other "irregular"
classes may use any examination period provided there is no
conflict (or one with conflicts if the conflicts are arranged for
by the "irregular" class). In the College of Literature, Science.
and the Arts, instructors of "irregular" classes with 20 students
or less, most of whom are seniors (or graduating graduates),
may use,the regular hours of the last week of classes for final
examinations if they wish. A final period on June 10 is available
for "irregular" classes which are unable to utilize an earlier
period.
All examinations of those expecting to receive a degree in
June must be completed not later than Saturday, June 5. It is
the responsibility of the instructor to arrange special examina-
tions, if necessary, for those students. In the College of Litera-
ture, Science, and the Arts, the times for special examinations
for those graduating in June for certain courses are indicated
below.
Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination. In the College of
Literature, Science, and the Arts, no date of examination may
be changed without the consent of the Committee on Examina-
tions. The graduating student should also check to see that
his examinations are to be completed by June 5.

TIME OF EXERCISE

TIME OF EXAMINATION

Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday

at
at
at
at

8......
9..
10......
11. .. .. .

Monday at 1..... .
Monday at 2..... .
Monday at 3......

.F.. . ri.,
..Mon.,
.......Sat.,
..Tues.,
..Thurs.,
..Wed.,
.. Sat.,
..Mon.,
.. Sat.,
..Tues.,
.. Wed.,
.. Fri.,
..Thurs.,
.- Sat..

June
May
May
June

Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday'

4,
31,
29,
1,

at
at
at
at
at
at
at

8......
9......
10......
11......
1.
2.....,
3......

June 3,
June 2,
June 5,
May 31,
May 29,
June 1,
June 2,
June 4,
June 3,
June 5,

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
9-12

Evening Classes, Seminars, and
Chem 21 ............................N
Irregular ..............................T
SPECIAL PERIODS
Ec. 51, 52, 53, 54, 102 ....................T
English 1, 2 ...........................:.F
Soc. 51, 54, 90 ..........................
Bot. 1, Zool. 1 ..........................N
Chem. 1, 3, 4, Psych 31 ................I..N
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 31, 32, 61, 62,
91, 92; Speech 31, 32 ..................T
German 1, 2, 31 ........................T
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32.. .. .. . ............V.
Pol. Sci. 1, 2 ..........................V

Letters to the Editor...

The Daily accords its readers the
privilege of submitting letters for
publication Iill this column. Subject
to space limitations, the general pol-
icy is to publish in the order in which
t heyare received allletters bearing
the writer's signature and address.
Letters exceeding :0o words, repeti-
tio", letters and letters of a &fama-
tory character or such letters which
for any other reason are not in good
taste will not be puilshed. The
editors reserve the privilege of cor-
lensing letters.

To the Editor:

Mon., May 31, 7 p.m.
Thurs., June 10, 9-12

Thurs., June

Fri.,
Sat.,
Mon.,
Mon.,
Tues.,
Tues.,
Wed.,
Wed.,

June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June

3,
4,
5,
7,
7,
8,
8,
9,'
9,

2- 5
2- 5
9-12
9-12
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
9-12
2- 5

AS AN ALTERNATE delegate to
the Democratic state conven-
tion and a member of the Demo-
crats for Douglas movement. I
should like to correct the totally
misleading impression presented
by a headline and story in Sun-
day's Daily.
The headline read: "Truman
Gains State Support - Local
Douglas Group Fails to Win Back-
ing."
The record shows that the con-
vention is sending an uninstruct-
ed delegation to Philadelphia.
That is exactly what the Douglas
supporters went down to secure.
The Douglas movement is only
two weeks old. To have expected
the convention to commit itself to
Douglas at this time would have
been premature. The chips how-
ever are falling our way. Many of
the delegates chosen Saturday are
already for Douglas. With the
delegation uninstructed we have
two months to make the state
conscious of Douglas and sell him
to the remaining delegates.
May I predict that Michigan
will be for Douglas on the first
ballot..
-Tom Walsh.
Palest(inP Iolie)i
To the Editor:
OUR POLICY concerning Pales-
tine- draws in blackhoutline
the intention of those who con-
trol our foreign policy. In Greece
we condemn before the United
Nations the armed bands and de-
mand an end to their activities.
In Palestine months after the
Arab states had publicly declared
their aggressive plans we plea for
a truce, the perennial cure-all, ig-
noring the invasion that has oc-
curred. The difference is that in
Greece we have bestowed our
friendship on the government re-
sisting the aggressors in Pales-
tine we have thrown our lot with
the invaders, the armed bands.
What a laughing mockery of the
United Nations! "The world's last,
best hope for peace."
The situation would not be so
tragic, nor so deplorable if our
Palestine action served and pro-
tected our national interest. The
United Nations is not valuable as
a thing in itself, but only in so
far as it renders service, promotes
peace. If we are to obtain a long
range benefit through action con-
trary to the concept of the world
organization, let us by all means
do so. But the only permanent
gain stemming from our Pales-
tine action is a large blot for
history.'s record. Furthermore,
the most permanent thing is
peace.
To the men who control our
foreign policy, peace is secondary.
They are mostly concerned with
the projection of our national
power into the international scene
as an end in itself. These men are
intelligent, capable, they know
where they are going. I think they
are dangerous. Unless new blood
is introduced into their chambers
as a 'result of either the conven-
tions of the two parties or the
election in November, we could
easily lose our basic freedoms and
our individual way of life through
regimentation for a war in which
we would lose our civilization.
-Roger Shaw.
Wallace's Support
To the Editor:
"SURE, I'm going to vote for
Wallace - but only because

have better 'utilized their efforts
within one of the major parties--
the Democrats are ripe for change
-where they might have avoided
the disproportionate influence of
their more Communistically in -
clined adherents.
It is a sad commentary that
liberalism here could not estab-
lish itself more soundly, but mnut
confine itself to weeping in a cor-
ner just to let people know that
they do weep.
-Robert Leopold
Conservation Officers
To the Editor:
j DID NOT THINK that such
grossly misinformed for unin-
formed people as Mr. Bob Dil-
worth existed on the campus. Per-
haps he does not realize, judging
by his recent editorial, thatethe
flora and fauna of the state of
Michigan are attractive enough
to make the tourist and outdoor
recreation industry second in
monetary value only to the auto-
mobile industry.
That section of the law referring
to seasonal, temporary dwellings
refers in particular to ice-fishing
shanties, in which much illegal
spearing has occurred in the past.
I should like to know if Mr. Dil-
worth has ever met a conserva-
tion officer. They are not, con--
trary to his beliefs, police officers
trying to check "shooting sparrows
out of season." (Incidentally, he
may shoot all the English spar-
rows he pleases - they're not pro-
tected.) They are, rather, the
friend of every hunter and fish-
erman in the field, protecting his
enjoyment from the depradations
of a few game hogs who have no
respect for others.
So far as I can see, only those
who have too many trout in their
creel, or an extra deer in the
trunk of the car, would object to
a brief search of their property.
Perha-ps Mr. Dilworth might find
this objectionable, though on what
grounds I don't know.
Might I suggest that he take
Course No. 194 - Conservation of
Natural Resources, in the School
of Forestry and Conservation.
This might help enlighten him as
to the sad state of many of our
natural resources .. .
-Arthur D. Doll
AS DISCUSSIONS concerning
the character and scope of
the European Recovery Program
unfolded in the United States and
Europe, it becomes increasingly
evident that sooner or later the
productive forces of the region
east of Germany will have to be
tapped for the long-term recon-
struction of the Western nations
included in the Marshall Plan-
unless Europe either becomes per-
manently dependent on American
resources for certain essential
foods and raw materials, with the
resulting necessity of greatly in-
creasing American appropriations
for the ERP, or else finds new al-
ternative sources of supplies, pos-
sibly in Africa.
While the countries of Western
Europe have been weighing the
possibility of obtaining increased
quantities of food, coal, oil and
timber from the countries of
Eastern Europe, the latter have
been examining with even greater
concern the prospects of purchas-
ing in the West machinery, tools,
and technical equipment ...
-Foreign Policy Reports.
t ~it

Fifty-Eighth Year

v

A

-4

,,

+ MUSIC

SPECIAL PERIODS FOR THOSE GRADUATING IN JUNE
Botany 1; Zoology 1; Psych 31...........Sat., May 29, 7 p.m.
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 31, 32, 61, 62, 91, 92
German 1, 2, 31
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32 ...................Tues., June 1, 7 p.m.
Speech 31, 32 .......................... Wed., June 2, 7 p.m.
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADVHNISTRATION
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any neces-
sary changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
SCHOOL OF FORESTRY AND CONSERVATION
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any neces-
sary changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual Instruction in Applied Music.
Individual examinations by appointment will be given for
all applied music courses (individual instruction) elected for
credit in any unit of the University. For time and place of exam-
inations, see bulletin board of the School of Music.
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any neces-
sary changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
MAY 29 TO JUNE 10, 1948
NOTE: For courses having both lecture and quizzes, the
time of exercise is the time of the first lecture period of the
week; for courses having quizzes only, the time of exercise is
the time of the first quiz period.
Drawing and laboratory work may be continued through
the examination period in amount equal to that normally de-
voted to such work during one week.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted
below the regular schedule. All cases of conflicts between as-
signed examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See bulletin board outside of Room 3036 East Engineering Build-
ing between May 12 and May 19 for instructions.
Seniors and graduates who expect to receive a degree this.
June and whose examination occurs after June 5, should also
report to Room 3036 E.E. between May 12 and May 19.
To avoid misunderstandings and errors each student should
receive notification of the time and place of his appearance in
each course during the period May 29 to June 10.
No date of examination may be changed without the consent

4

W ITH A FIRST RATE CONCERT in all
respects, Eugene Ormandy, the Phila-
delphia Orchestra and contralto Cloe Elmo
provided a most pleasant coda to the 1948
May Festival series.
Orchestrally, the concert ranged from the
quietly whimsical Haydn Clock Symphony
to Respighi's thoroughly satiric and any-
thing but quiet "Feste Romane." Nor was
the change in mood made by the orchestra
less than a complete change in character.
The Haydn appropriately emphasized the
magnificent string section and the very
able woodwinds, producing a highly en-
joyable work.
Conversely, but with no loss in effect,
the brasses and percussions, including two
tambourines, were employed in the Respig-
hi suite. Particularly interesting trombone
effects were produced, and much to audi-
ence enjoyment, a guitar materialized in the
string section.
John Minsker, English horn soloist, pre-
sented a more than satisfactory perform-
ance in the Sibelius "Swan of Tuonela" with
orchestra work of equally high quality.
High point of the concert, though, was the
Italian contralto Cloe Elmo. With a voice as
powerful as it was true, she also showed
great feeling and understanding in her se-
lections. Probably the best received of all
was her last number - one of Azucena's
arias from Il Trovatore - which she sang
with fire and polish as well as an obvious
deep sympathy for the personality of the
tragic character.
Altogether, the May Festival final con-
cert was a successful climax to the week-

SPARKED by the fine musicianship in the
latter part of the concert, the fifth of
the May Festival series - an all Rach--
maninoff program - ended on a much less
disappointing note than it began.
The Choral Union, although showing
some results of good technical training, lack-
ed greatly in expression throughout the
choral symphony "The Bells." The soloists
too, seemed to sidestep true understanding
of the music and sang their parts with good
tonal quality and fine timing, but little
apparent feeling.
The final portion of the symphony -
"Mournful Iron Bells" - seemed to suffer
particularly. The music is intensely dra-
matic, but much of the intended effect was
lost through a seemingly disinterested per-
formance.
The orchestra, itself, under the direction
of Thor Johnson, was surprisingly medi-
ocre, due perhaps to the fact that healthy
portions of the string and woodwind sections
were absent. Whatever the reason, the gen-
eral apathy of the performers throughout
the symphony was not lightened by the
orchestral interpretation.
The young pianist Leon Fleisher provid-
ed by far the brightest portion of the after-
noon. His performance of the second Piano
Concerto showed deep expression and suc-
cessfully, at least for the moment, erased
memories of juke-box variations of the last
movement.
-Naomi Stern
T HE AMERICA of 1948, the most pow-
erful nation in the world, is caught in
a paroxysm of fear. For more than a decade,

:,

of the Classification Committee.
TIME OF EXERCISE
Monday (at 8......
Monday (at 9.........
Monday (at 10.........
Monday (at 11.........
Monday (at 1.........
Monday (at 2.........
Monday(at '3.......

TIME OF EXAMINATION

..........Fri.,
..........M on.,
..........Sat.,
..........Tues.,
.. Thurs.,
.. . .. . Wed..
.......... S at.,.

June
May
May
June
June
June
June
May
May
June
June
June
June
June

4,
31,
29,
1,
3,
2,
5,
31,
29,,
1,
2,
4,
3,
5,

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
9-12

I'm certain he can't be elected."
Have you ever heard that one? It
is certainly a common remark, but
apparently the Progressives here
on campus and elsewhere do not
realize its import.
Of cournse many Americans re-
sent 'our unguided or misguided
Democratic Administration and
the smug Republican Congress
which makes little effort to cor -
rect the Administration's blu-
ders. The real progressive (small
"p") is disconcerted by develop-
ments in our foreign policy, by
failures in attacking inflation and
housing problems and by an in-
finity of related questions. But
do all the discontented voters be-
lieve that Henry Wallace has the
answer? Can they believe that it
is Russian policy which is always
right, our always wrong; that ev-
ery question of policy which is
not "Progressive" (capital "P") is
the result of evil pressures of big
business?
These people recognize the evils
and distortions among them, but

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