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April 30, 1948 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-04-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

six

THE AlICHIGAN DAILY

FRTDtAY. itPRL 30, I-M

- -- --- ._.......... . . ... .

. .

'U' TAKES TO THE AIR:
Armchair Listeners Hear
Events by Remote Control

By MARY STEIN
The University is getting wired
for sound.
Campus radio listeners can now
hear lectures, musical programs
and other events from Hill Aud-
itorium, L y d i a K,endelssohn
Theatre, Burton Tower, Univer-
sity Hall, the I-M Building, the
stadium, and Harris Hall without
budging from their armchairs.
Portholes at Hill'
Remote control set-ups are also
being planned by the Broadcast-
ing Service for Natural Science
Auditorium, Kellogg Auditorium
a n d Rackham Lecture a n d
Assembly Halls. There's hardly a
campus nook or cranny that can't.
be reached by radio, at least by a
walkie-talkie.
Fund Drive
Meeting Set
Campus organizations who
sponsor drives on campus have
been requested to attend a drives
calendar meeting by Jean Gringle,
member of the Student Legisla-
ture Cabinet.
The fund drive calendar for
next year will be set up at the
meeting, to be held at 3 p.m. Wed-
nesday at League, and plans to
institute a campus fund chest will
be discussed.
Organizations who plan to con-
duct drives during the summer
session are also asked tor petition
at this time, Miss Gringle said.

Symphony audiences have pro-
bably been startled to see faces
peering down at them out of two
of the light "portholes" in Hill
Auditorium's ceiling. The faces
belong to the Broadcasting Ser-
vice's announcer and engineer,
perched beside their equipment
on a wooden platform behind the
stage.
Microphones are extended from
the top of the auditorium's round-
ed ceiling by nimble electricians
who crawl, with their wiring ap-
paratus, through the dome's maze
of plaster and wire before each
broadcast.
Swing Symphony
The Hill control room is now
being finished, with a steel plat-
form planned to replace the pre-
sent wooden one.
A swing symphony broadcast
will be heard from Hill Auditor-
ium May 9, and the equipment
will also be in demand for sum-
mer musical activities.
A second control room is at
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre. The
"royal" box at the theatre, long
unused by a democratic Univer-
sity students-who also prefer
better vantage points-is now
crowned with an amplifier and
other apparatus.
Every Friday at 2:30 p.m. on-
the-spot programs from admin-
istrative offices in University Hall
are broadcast. Wires are strung
from the windows of the Broad-
casting Service on Angell Hall's
fourth floor down into the ad-
joining building.

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1

HARRY T. MONTGOMERY
......speaks here today
* * *

BEER.
DEPOT
CONVENIENT DRIVE-THRU SERVICE
BEER MIXERS WINE
CHAMPAGNE & SNACKS
Daily: 10A.M.-l0 P.M. Sunday: Noon-7 P.M.
NO PARKING PROBLEMS
114 East Williams Call 7191
...............
. 1

Montgomery, j
AP Business
Editor, To Talk
Harry T. Montgomery, business1
editor of the Associated Press, will
give two lectures in journalism
today, under sponsorship of the1
journalism department.
"The Press and Business" will1
be the subject of a talk at 8 p.m.t
in the Rackham amphitheatre. 1
Montgomery will talk to jour-
nalism students on "The Import-1
ance of Economics in Today'sI
News" at 3 p.m., Rm. E, Haven
Hall.
A former Nieman fellow at Har-
vard studying economic history
and theory, he has also studiedI
at King's College, London, Colum-
bia University, and the University
of Michigan.1
For seven years, until 1937, he
was a night editor with Inter-
national News Service and from
then until the outbreak of the
war he was an assistant night edi-
tor and cable editor for the As-
sociated Press.
During World War I, Mont-
gomery was editor of foreign re-
ports for morning newspapers.
From 1945 to 1947 he was Chief
of the Ottawa Bureau and at that,
time became Business editor, his
present position.
Lawyers...
(Continued from Page 1)
cameras ecompany, turned pale
when she saw the blue uniform
and summons. "I told my. hus-
band to pay that traffic ticket,"
she said.
Once the initial shock had worn
off, coeds gave Sgt. Huigenza an
enthusiastic welcome. He was
taken right into the dining room
of several sororities to serve his
subpoenas, and one group hon-
ored him with three choruses of
"the Birmingham Jail."
A lawyer's wife in Pittsfield Vil-
lage was the most relieved that
the summons was only an invita-
tion to a dance. "I thought for
sure that four year old son of mine
had broken something again," she
sighed with relief.
Lawyer with Padded Shoulders
In spite of his nine years on the
police force, one coed refused to
believe Sgt. Huizenga was a real
officer and not a lawyer with
padded shoulders. "He smiled so
sweetly I didn't think he was a
cop," she said.
All indications were that no
lawyed would be stood up tonight.
"Not one of the women tried to
dodge the summons," Huizena
said.

Goal of $5,000
Set for Fresh
Air Camnp nd
Tag Day Collections<
Scheduled Wednesday
With a goal of $5,000 as their
objective in this year's Fresh Air
Camp drive, students will be out.
with tags and buckets at every
conspicuious spot on campus next1
Wednesday.
Tag Day, an annual student
fund-raisingdcampaign to help
"send the kids to camp" will'
represent the cmbined efforts of'
several campus organizations-
Assembly, AIM, Pan-Hel, IFC, the-
League and the Union.
Formerly just an Assembly pro-
ject, the Tag Day Drive has been
expanded to an all-campus affair
to assure maximum student sup-
port and interest in its objectives.
Some of the money collected on
Tag Day will go toward the pur-
chase of camping equipment and
craft materials for the camp,
which is located on Patterson
Lake, 24 miles northwest of Ann
Arbor.
Student contributions will also
be used to help defray the camp's
operating expenses, and provide
personnel for its medical services,
transportation, dietitians a n d
laundry services.
Members of the Fresh Air Camp
Executive Committee are Norris
Domangue and Eugene Lamb of
AIM, Kathleen Watson of Pan-
Hel, Jim McCobb of IFC, Mary
Quiatt and Irma Eichhorn of
Assembly, Janet Cork of the Lea-
gue, and Bob Holland of the
Union.
Walter Dean is in charge of the
publicity for the Fresh Air Camp
Drive. The faculty members spon-
soring the project are Miss Ethel
McCormick and Peter Ostafin.
Campus
Calendar
United World Federalists: Ex-
ecutive Council Meeting, 4 p.m.,
Michigan Union, 3rd floor.
International Center Instruc-
tion classes in American Ball
Room Dancing will resume, Room
302, Union.
YPCM: Executive Committee
meeting, 5 p.m., Union.
German Coffee Hour: 3-4:30
p.m., League Coke Bar. Students
and faculty members invited.
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
Friday Evening Services from 7 to
7:30 p.m. to accommodate those
who wish to attend the May Fes-
tival.
Wesleyan Guild: Open house, 8
p.m., Wesley Foundation. Col-
ored slides of the West will be
shown.
Roger Williams Guild: Open
house after the May Festival Con-
cert.

DIRTY HANDS:
Fir ig Lin' Work Precedes
I whte Collar Studis Told

> -

"You're going to get your hands
dirty," Thomas A. Beaver, Ford
director o saiaried personnel,
warned 100 business and engin eer,-
ing students yesterday, at. a lun-
cheon in Dearborn Inn, Detroit.
Beaver discussed "Opportunities
in the F'rd Motor Company" and
outlined the company's two-year
"post graduate" training pro-
gram. One hundred college grad-
uates from all over the nation are
accepted each year and spend one
Garg Editor
Red-Faced
After Attack
By M. F. CALLAUAN, JR..
A near-tragedy was averted to-
day when local gendarmes res-
cued Thom Strope, managing edi-
tor of the Gargoyle, from the
maddened clutches of a shapeless
female who gave her name as An-
astasia Bogolomets.
Strope had been walking toward
Angell Hall, when he was set upon
by this women, who belabored him
about the head and elbows with a
large bronze hammer and sickle.
Miss Bogolomets was wearing a
large mauve and green "Shaeffer
for President" button, which sub-
sequently lodged in Strope's
trachea.
Resuscitated, Strope expressed
an ignorance as to the reason for
the affair, and also revealed that
he had been shot at from a pass-
ing automobile late last evening.
The vehicle, pure white save for
the legend 'Cal is your Pal-So
Spill It!", bore a Lansing license
plate. It has not been seen in Ann
Arbor since.
Miss Bogolomets gave what may
be a clue to the whole affair, when
she mentioned a few words about
"that awful rag!" It devbloped, al-
though her suit was showing the
effect of proletarian orgies, she
was referring to the Gargoyle,
which is slated to rock the campus
Monday with its blushing Commu-
nist issue. As Miss Bogolomets
foams at the mouth at such times,
no further information could be
gained.
Strope was no help either. He
has gone to see the State Capitol.
Life membership cards for
Union members will be ready
May 3 and may be picked up
in the business office of the
Michigan Union, located in the
basement. Men students who
have spent eight semesters at
the University are eligible.

year working "on the firing line"
in the manufacturing processes
and then move up to white-collar
work, he said.
Many Openings
"The job opportunities for busi-
ness administration and engineer-
ing students are not as great as in
normal times, although there are
still many openings. We have
been reorganizing in the past
three years and making many per-
sonnel changes involving men al-
ready in the auto industry," Beav-
er explained.
"But once your foot is in the
door. merit and ability to assume
responsibility will determine how
far you go," Beaver commented.
Need Experience
Students need a background of
experience, besides college train-
ing, because there is much to
learn about the auto industry, he
said. "That is the reason for the
apprenticeship program."
The group, which was sponsor-
ed by Delta Sigma Pi, business ad-
ministration fraternity, took an
"off the beaten track" tour of
the River Rouge plant and in-
spected the motor assembly and
glass manufacturing plants.
Plant "B" where Ford is tool-
ing up for a "revolutionary" 1949
car was officially closed to the
group, but two wide-eyed mem-
bers of the party reported a
glimpse of the new Ford. Accord-
ing to their hazy accounts, the
vehicle incorporates all the best
features of the Tucker, Cadillac
and Studebaker.
Professors Leave
Five University political science
professors left today for the Sixth
Conference of Midwest Political
Scientists, to be held today,to-
morrow, and Sunday at Indiana-
polis.
Prof. James K. Pollock, chair-
man of the political science de-
partment, will participate in a
discussion on "Political Trends in
Europe," and Prof. Harold M.
Dorr will be one of a group dis-
cussing "Recent Developments in
American Constitutional Law."
Also attending the meeting are
Prof. Joseph Kallenbach, Prof.
Russell H. Fifield, and Prof. C. F.
Norton.

For Sale at
SWIFTS DRUG STORE
340 South State Street
The Rexall Store on the Campus
Ft I

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... custom tailored
at this low price
Values up to $9.85
E PLEATS and

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ii

11

tH E
PHILADELPHIA
O RCH ESTRA
eugene
URMANDY, conductor
for your permanent enjoyment on
Colum bia aRecords

FORDHAM UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF LAW
NEW YORK
Three-Year Day Course
Four-year Evening course
CO-EDUCATIONAL
Member Assn. of Amer. Law Schools
Accredited College Degree Required
for Admission
Veterans of World War II who have
completed two years of college work
toward accredited degree may matri-
culate within one year of honorable
discharge.
Full transcript of record required in
every case.
FIRST YEAR CLASS BEGINS
September 27, 1948
For further information address
REGISTRAR FORDHAM UNIV.
SCHOOL OF LAW
302 Broadway, New York 7, N.Y.

v

BEETHOVEN: Seventh Symphony
MM 557 ................................. $7.25
BEETHOVEN: Ninth Symphony
with Westminster Choir and Soloists
M M 591 .................................$10.85
BRAHMS: Third Symphony
M M 642 ..................................$6.00
BRAHMS :Fourth Symphony
MVM 567 ................................ $7.25

PROKOFIEV: Classical Symphony
MX 287 ...........................
RESPIGHI: Pines of Rome
MM 616..........................

....$3.50
.$4.75

RESPIGHI: Feste Romane
MM 707...............................$4.75
STRAUSS: Death and Transfiguration
MM 613 ................................. $4.75
TCHAIKOVSKY: Fourth Symphony
M M 736 ................................. $7.25
WEBER: Der Freischutz Overture
12665D...... ........................$1.25
These are but a few suggestions from the long list of
Philadelphia Orchestra recordings on Columbia Master-
works. Hear this superb orchestra at the May Festival
and enjoy their music in your own home on Columbia
Records.

The
Philadelphia Orchestra
EueeOrmandy, geeconductor
Transcontinental Tour sponsored by
Columbia Records inc.
NOW APPEARING
IN THE
MAY FESTIVAL
for your permanent enjoyment on
Columbia wRecords
BEETHOVEN: Symphony No. 9 in D Minor, Op. 125
"Choral" with Stella Roman, soprano; Enid Szantho,
Contralto; Frederic Jagel, tenor: Nicola Moscona,
basso; and The Westminster Choir. Set MM-591
GERSHWIN: Rhapsody in Blue
with Oscar Levant, Piano Set MX-251
HANDEL: Water Music Suite.
Set MX-279

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