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April 28, 1948 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-04-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1
WNDESDlAy, &?fLfM 1948

PAGE RYI

i'HE MICUICGAN' DA LY

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'U' POSTAL SYSTEM:
Campus Mail Headquarters
Housed in U' Hall Basement

The
City Beat

ENGINE TROUBLE:
Geometric Problems Rack
Brains of Harassed Pledges

By KEN LOWE
The focal point of the Univer-
sity's bustling mail system is a
small, decrepit office that is
AP Business
Editor To Talk
Montgomery Speech
Scheduled for Friday
Harry T. Montgomery, general
business editor of the Associated
Press will speak on "The Press
and Business" at 8 p.m., Friday
in the in the Rackham Ampi-
theatre.
A former night editor with the
International News Service and
an assistant city editor for the
Associated, Press since 1937,
Montgomery was made editor in
charge of Foreign Report for
morning n e w s pa p e r s during
World War II. From 1945 to 1947,
he was Chief of the AP Bureau in
Ottawa, Canada.
Montgomery has studied at
Hairvard University on a Nie-
man Scholarship, specializing in
economic history and economic
theory, at King's College, Lon-
don England, and Columbia Uni-
versity. He also has studied one
year at Michigan.
In addition to his evening talk,
Montgomery will address stud-
ents of journalism on "The im-
portance of Economics in, To-
day's News" at 3 p. M., in Mm.
E, Haven Hall.
Both lectures are under the
auspices of the Journalism de-
partment and are part of a
University Lecture series in the
field of journalism.

tucked away in the basement of
University Hall.
Manned by three full-time em-
ployees and one part-time worker,
the office is responsible for the
collection and delivery of all of-
ficial mail on campus. It handles
all out-going and incoming ordi-
nary, or "government," mail as
well as all local interdepartment-
al campus mail.
Every Building Covered
Two routes stem from the mail
room to service every building on
campus. One carrier is assigned tc
each route and he makes two de-
liveries a day. Lach department
has its own pick-up and delivery
box, which means that several
stops are made in most buildings.
Exact mileage of the routes. is
not known, but Edward Vanda-
warker, supervisor of the mail
room, said that he was sure the
total was quite a bit more than 14
miles.
"Itmeasured it once with a ped-
ometer and it was 14 miles," he
said. "But that was 20 years ago
and the campus has expanded a
lot since then." Vanawarker has
been a carrier and general over-
seer of the campus mail system
for 36 years.
No records have been kept of
the amount of mail handled from
day to day but the quantity has
increased sharply in the last few
years.
New Headquarters
The mail room'staff is looking
forward to the day when it ex-
changes its cramped office for
quarters in the new General Serv-
ice Building.
"We intend to reorganize the
mail system then," Patten Rob-
erts, mail room employee, said.
".For one thing, we intend to cen-
tralize the distributionpointscand
reduce the number of stops to
one per building."

A total maximum of 17 years in
prison terms were handed down
by Judge James R. Breakey, Jr.,
in the Washtenaw County Circuitt
Court yesterday.,
Kenneth Callander, 19, 4111 ,
Detroit St., Flint, was given 1 '2
to 2 years in Southern Michigan1
Prison on a charge of passing a
bad check.-
Franklyn Coleman, 20, 223 N.
River St., Ypsilanti, received a 3-
15 year sentence for armed rob-
bery. In both cases, the minimum
sentence was recommended.
More than 20,000 Ann Arbor
area natural gas users will re-
ceive an average of $9.44 in re-
bates sometime in June or July.
A check for $165,347 to cover
the refunds was sent to the Ann
Arbor Bank yesterday. The re-
bates resulted from a FPC direc-
tive ordering the supplier of Mich-
igan Consolidated Gas to adjust
its rate for the period to October
1942 to September 1945.
Hoover Ball & Bearing Com-
pany's "final offer" will be voted
upon by the 400 members of the
CIO-UAW local 38 today in a
special meeting.
The conditions of the offer were
not revealed.
* * *
Sheriff's officers are holding
Bernice Loken, 44, 12%/ S. Wash-
ington St., Ypsilanti, in connec-
tion with the stabbing of her hus-
band Selmer, 47, in a Michigan
Ave., tavern yesterday.
IRA Meeting Advanced
The Inter-Racial Meeting,
originally scheduled for Thursday,
has been changed to 7:30 p.m. to-
day in the Union.
The proposed constitution will
be discussed and voted upon.

i

By LEON JAROFF1
"Those crazy engineers," mut-
tered an early morning stroller
last Sunday, as he came upon a
neat, geometric pattern laid out
with stakes and canvas on the
lawn just inside the Engine Arch.
But little did he know that the
apparently meaningless pattern
Campus
Calendar
Young Democrats - Meeting
7:30 p.m., Rm. 302 Union.
Student Recital - Jacqueline
Kagen Rosenblatt, pianist, 8:30
p.m, Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Radio-"Hopwood Room," 2:30
p.m., WKAR.
Expectant Mothers Classes -
Meeting 7:30 p.m., Child Health
Building.
Physiology Lecture--Dr. August
Krogh, "The Work of Frisch on
the Language of Bees, 8 p.m.
Rackham Amphitheatre.
State - "Killer McCoy," 1, 3, 5,
7 and 9 p.m.
Michigan - "Tycoon," 1, 3, 5,
7 and 9 p.m.
Union Opera--7:15 p.m. Jour-
nalism Newsroom, Haven Hall,
meeting for all interested in writ-
ing songs, lyrics or arrange-
ments.
IRA-Constitutional meeting
:30 p.m. Union.
Lecture - R. C. Sollenberger,
Executive Secretary of Conveyor
Equipment Manufacturers; 7:30
p.m., Natural Science Auditorium.
Delta Sigma Phi - Russell
Stilwell, traveling secretary - at
the Union until this afternoon to
see members or interested stu-
dents.

'

before him represented 13 hours
of gruelling work by the pledge
group of Tau Beta Pi, national en-
gineering honor society.
It all started when the pledge
group met at 1 p.m. Saturday in
the East Engineering building to
begin the "problem session," the
last and most nerve-wracking as-
signment in their initiation activ-
ities.
Grinning sadistically, active
members handed out sheets on
which were printed problems that
would have very easily stopped
Albert Einstein in his tracks.
Pledges Dismayed
Dismay was obvious on the face
of every pledge as the session
started and soon a blanket of sil-
ence had fallen over the East En-
gineering Building.
Now and then, a group of
pledges would sally forth and pro-
ceed to the top of the IM build-
ing, a local bar, or other far-
away places to gather data neces-
sary for the solution of the prob-
lems.
Finally, near the magic hour of
midnight, one of the pledges per-
formed the mystic work that was
necessary to complete the last
problem.
Headlights Point Way
Hope began to gleam 6om the
pledges' eyes. Armed with sur-
veying instruments, they invaded
the vicinity of the Engine Arch.
By the glare of headlights, the
surveyors soon located the point
they were looking for, and the
construction of the symbol began.
At 2 p.m. the last stakes were
driven and the still of the night
was shattered by a tremendous
cry of victory as the slide rule-
brandishing pledges realized that
their monumental task was done.

"I

RELIEF OPERATIONS-Prof. William Haber (right) looks on while his brother Sam explains the
relief operations of the American Joint Distribution Committee in the American Zone of Germany.
Prof. Haber is on a leave of absence from the University to serve as adviser on Displaced Persons
to Lt. Gen. Lucius Clay. The relief activities of the Joint Distribution Committee are carried on

with funds subscriped through
Preference. .
(Continued from Page 1)
marked in comedians such as Bob
Hope and Jimmy Durante, campus
celebrities like "Buck Dawson, and
"Bump" Elliott.
"Joe" Stalin even managed to be
scrawled in by one student, while
others stuck to presidential hope-
fuls of former elections such as
Paul V. McNutt and Sen. Harry F.
Byrd. One funster evidently de-
cided to make up a Gerhart Eisler
by indicating his name for a presi-
dential choice.
Ballots invalidated for improper
marking or those lacking any pref-
erence totalled 59. An additional
71 ballots were marked in the
"most likely to succeed" column,
which omitted indicating a presi-
dential choice.
Elections
(Continued from Page 1)
Charges of fraud, which have
always been levelled after previ-
ous campus elections; were con-
spicuously absent so far, according
to election officials. IFC executive
members who checked polling
booths after each change of per-
sonnel yesterday may have been
partially responsible for this
"clean" record.
While volunteer ballot counters
distributed and redistributed the
ballots under the direction of Leg-
islature election officials, candi-
dates strained to watch the totals
from behind a ,rope barrier. The
complicated Hare system of pro-
portional representation, used in
all Legislature elections, was fol-
lowed.
Candidates eliminated at the
time The Daily went to press in-
clude: Aidinoff, Parmenter, M. A.
Harris, Krasnick, Miller, Elkins,
Johnson, Allen, Geib, Van Volken-
burgh, Holmquist, Taylor, Kling-
beil, Olsen, Steere, Waldorf, Da-
vidson, and Wright.
Others are: Benedict, Maisel,
Hansen, Evans, Sands, White,
Williams, Hooker, Neef, May,
Rink, Richardson, Shaefer, Ewing,
Berg, and Freed.

Natural education suffered a
setback last week when a small
gray swallow sat in on a German
31 class.
Reversing the usual procedure
of learning about nature outdoors,
Church Group
Plans Meeting
Students interested in register-
ing for the Michigan Student
Christian Convocation in East
Lansing Saturday have been re-
quested to contact Lane Hall as
soon as possible.
Approximately 1,200 students
from campuses throughout the
state will gather to investigate
the theme "The Christian Con-
cept of the University," at the all-
day conference.
Basic problems confronting the,
Christian student will be studied
by the inter - denominational
group. Christian responsibility'
will be related to occupational
choices in discussion groups de-
voted to law, education] -politics
and engineering, among others.

the bird decided to test the merits
of formal education first-hand.
So he flew breezily through the
wide open window of the U Hall
classroom, and preched comfort-
ably on one of the empty desks.
The swallow soon found that a
knowledge of German was not
quite what he wanted from col-
lege, but when he decided to leave,
couldn't find the way out again.
Helpful class members opened
all the windows in an attempt to
relieve the sufferings of the mig-
guided swallow, but their move-
ments only frightened him all the
more and he sought safety near
the high ceiling.
They closed all the windows but
one and drew the shades, hoping
he would be less confused. But
their reasoning was lost on the
swallow. He promptly flew to a
closed window and fluttered mis-
erably between the shade and the
window pane.
Finally the bird timidly emerg-
ed from his hiding place. Faster
and faster he flew around the
room, and then, with a final burst
of courage, propelled himself out
the window.

r
L
t
t

Put Yourself in This Picture!
You can be a Stewardess if you have a sparkling personality
and attractive appearance, are single, between 21 and 28,
5' 2" to 5' 6", under 125 lbs., in good physical condition and
don't need glasses. Graduates preferred.
Four-week training program at company expense. Starting
salary after training, $175 with periodic increases. Expenses'
paid while away from home base.
Write AMERICAN AIRLINES Personnel Manager at one of
these offices for interview: NEW YORK - 100 East 42 Street;
CHICAGO - 52-45 West 55 Street, Chicago Municipal Airport;
FORT WORTH - Meacham Field; LOS ANGELES - 5910 Avion
Drive, Los Angeles Municipal Airport.
AMERICAN AIRLINES

the United Jewish Appeal.
1
Swallow Finds College Life
Presents Multiple Problems

by
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