100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 27, 1948 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-04-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, APRI 2f7, 1948

rTIlE MICHIGAN DAILY

U ~

'Daily' Questionnaire:
SL Candidates Polled on Campus Issues

OPEN LETTER:
Cites Election Importance

Answers to six questions on con-
troversial campus issues given by
74 of the 79 Student Legislature
candidates in a Daily-conducted
survey appear here.
The questions were:
1. If elected to the Student Leg-
islature, would you work toward
making it a more active member
of the Michigan Committee for
Academic Freedom?
2. If elected to the Legislature,
would you work toward SL action
on the tennis court fees?
3. If elected, would you work
toward SL action on lifting the
Regents' ban on political speak-
ers?
4. If elected, would you work on
the SL p- gram to serve beer in
the TT" A?
5. If elected, would you work to-
ward SL action to establish stud-
ent cooperatives such as the book
exchange or a student cameteria?
6. If elected, would you work to-
ward SL action to have MYDA re-
nstated as a campus organization.
Candidates' names and their
answers follow:
Bernard Aidinoff-1. yes; 2. yes;
3. yes; 4. no opinion; 5. yes; 6. no.
Richard Allen-1. no opinion;
2. yes; 3. no; 4. no opinion; 5. yes;
6. no.
Hugh Benedict-1. no; 2. yes;
3. no opinion; 4. yes; 5. yes; 6. no.
Harry Berg-i. yes; 2. no opin-
ion; 3. yes; 4. yes; 5. yes; 6. yes.
Donald Calhoun-1. no opinion;
2, yes; 3, no opinion; 4, yes; 5, yes;
r 6, no.
Russell B. Clanahan-1. yes;
2. yes; 3. yes; 4. no opinion; 5. yes;
6. no.
Richard Cook-1. yes; 2. yes;
3. yes. 4. yes; 5. yes; 6. no.
Names Added
To NSA List
Names of 52 more foreign stu-
dents interested in corresponding
with Americans have been receiv-
ed by the National Students As-
This adds to the list of poten-
tial letter writers which NSA has
been compiling from Germany,
Russia, Poland, England, and,
other European countries.
University students indicated
an interest in corresponding
with foreign students about two
months ago when many of them
signed up for the project. Since
that time, NSA has contac ed
students in European universities
and colleges who have rapidly
responded to the project.
Names and addresses of for-
eign students, as well as further
information on this project can
be obtained by calling Dick Cort-
wright at 2-4591.

Hugh Cooper-1. no; 2. yes;
3. no; 4. no; 5. yes; 6. no.
Mary Davidson-1. yes; 2. yes;
3. yes; 4. yes; 5. yes; 6. no opinion.
Marty DeLano-1. yes; 2. yes;
3. yes; 4. yes; :. yes; 6. no.
"Buzz" Durant-1. no opinion;
2. no opinion; 3. no opinion; 4.
yes; 5. yes; 6. no opinion.
Hubert Elkins-i. yes; 2. yes;
3. yes; 4. no; 5. yes; 6. yes.
Harold E. Evans--i. yes; 2. yes;
3. yes; 4. no opinion; 5. yes; 6. no.
Harry D. Evans-1. no opinoin;
2. yes; 3. yes; 4. yes; 5. yes; 6. no
opinion.
Harriett Ewing-1. yes; 2. yes;
3. yes; 4. no; 5. yes; 6. no opinion.
Jean Fagan-1. yes; 2. yes; 3.
yes: 4. yes; 5. yes; 6. yes.
Robert Freed-1. yes; 2. yes;
3. yes; 4. yes; 5. yes; 6. yes.
Courtland Geib-1. yes; 2. yes;
3. no; 4. no; 5. yes; 6. no.
Marian Grant-i. yes; 2. no; 3.
no opinion; 4. yes; 5. yes; 6. no.
Hugh Greenberg-1. yes; 2. yes;
3. yes; 4. yes; 5. yes; 6. yes.
Richard Hall-1. no opinion; 2.
yes; 3. yes; 4. no opinion; 5. yes;
6. no opinion.
Walter Hansen-1. yes; 2. yes;
3. yes; 4. yes; 5. yes; 6. yes.
Al Harris-1. no opinion; 2. yes;
3. yes; 4. yes; 5. no opinion; 6. no.
Mary Ann Harris- 1. yes; 2.
yes; 3. yes; 4. yes; 5. yes; 6. no.
William Haydon-i. yes; 2. yes;
3. yes; 4. yes; 5. yes; 6. no.
Dick Hirn-i. yes; 2. yes; 3. no;
4. yes; 5. yes; 6. yes.
. Pres Holmes-1. yes; 2. yes; 3.
yes; 4. no opinion; 5. yes; 6. yes.
Marilyn Holmquist--i. no op-
inion; 2. yes; 3. yes; 4. no opinion;
5. yes; 6. no.
Charles Hooker-1. no opinion;
2. yes; 3. yes; 4. yes; 5. yes; 6. no
opinion.
Knight Houghton-1. yes; 2.
yes; 3. yes; 4. yes; 5. yes; 6. no
opinion.
Cathy Houston-1. yes; 2. yes;
3. yes; 4. yes; 5. yes; 6. no opin-
ion.
Harold Jacobson-1. no opin-
ion; 2. yes; 3. no; 4. no; 5. yes;
6. no.
Pat James-1. yes; 2. yes; 3. yes;
4. yes; 5. yes; 6. yes.
James Jans-1. yes; 2. yes; 3.
yes; 4. yes; 5. yes; 6. yes.
Le Roy Jimerson-1. yes; 2. yes;
3. yes; 4. yes; 5. yes; 6. yes.
Jeannie Johnson-1. yes; 2. yes;
3. yes; 4. yes; 5. no opinion; 6. no.
Tom Kelsey-i. no; 2. yes; 3.
yes; 4. yes; 5. no opinion; 6. yes.
"Andy" Klingbeil-i. no opin-
ion; 2. yes; 3. no opinion; 4. no;
5. yes; 6. no.
Dulie Krasnick-1. yes; 2. yes;
3. yes; 4. no opinion; 5. yes; 6. yes.
Edwin Lewinson-1. yes; 2. yes;
3. yes; 4. no; 5. yes; 6. yes.
Marcia Lipsett-i. yes; 2. yes;
3. yes; 4. no; 5. yes; 6. yes.

Larry Maisl-1. yes; 2. yes; 3.
no; 4. yes; 5. yes; 6. yes.
Stanley May-1. yes; 2. yes; 3.
yes; 4. yes; 5. yes; 6. yes.
Paul McCracken-i. yes; 2. yes;
3. no; 4. yes; 5. yes; 6. no.
Arch McGregor-1. yes; 2. yes;
3. yes; 4. no; 5. yes; 6. no.
James Mcllhenny-1. yes; 2,
yes; 3. no opinion; 4. no; 5. yes;
6. no opinion.
Don McNeil- 1. yes; 2. yes; 3.
yes; 4. yes; 5. yes; 6. yes.
James Miller-1. no opinion; 2.
yes; 3. no opinion; 4. yes; 5. yes;
6. no.
Allan Neef-i. yes; 2. yes; 3.
yes; 4. no opinion; 5. yes; 6. yes.
Duane Nuechterlein-1. yes; 2.
yes; 3. no; 4. yes; 5. yes; 6. no.
Delores Olsen-1. yes; 2. yes; 3.
yes; 4. no opinion; 5. yes; 6. yes.
Phil Parmenter-1. yes; 2. yes;
3. yes; 4. yes; 5. yes; 6. no.
yes; 3. yes; 4. yes; 5. yes; 6. no
Dorothy Priestley-i. yes; 2.
yes; 3. yes; 4. yes; 5. yes; 6. no
opinion.
Shirley Ann Richardson-1. yes;
2. yes; 3. yes; 4. yes; 5. yes; 6. no.
"Doie" Rink-1. yes 2. yes; 3.
yes; 4. no; 5. yes; 6. yes.
John Ryder-1. yes; 2. yes; 3.
yes; 4. no opinion; 5. yes; 6. no.
Doug Sands-1. yes; 2. yes; 3.'
yes; 4. yes; 5. yes; 6. no opinion.
Sam Schaefer-1. no; 2. yes; 3.
no opinion; 4. yes; 5. no opinion;
6. no.
Rose Marie Schoetz-1. yes; 2.
yes; 3. yes; 4. no; 5. yes; 6. no.
Dick Slocum-1. yes; 2. yes; 3.
yes; 4. no; 5. yes; 6. no.
Ralph Sosin-1. no opinion; 2.
yes; 3. yes; 4. yes; 5. yes; 6. yes.
Norman Steere-1. no opinion;
2. yes; 3. yes; 4. yes; 5. yes; 6. no.
Jan Taylor--i . yes;2. yes; 3.
yes; 4. yes; 5. yes; 6. no.
Marian Trapp-1. yes; 2. yes; 3.
no opinion; 4. yes; 5. yes; 6. no.
L. L. Van Volkenburgh-1. no
opinion; 2, yes; 3, yes; 4, yes; 5,
yes; 6, no opinion.
Lucille Waldorf-1, yes; 2. yes;
3, yes; 4, yes; 5, yes; 6, no.
Herbert Weingarten-1. yes; 2.
yes; 3. yes; 4. no; 5. yes; 6. no
opinion.
Curt White-1. yes; 2. yes; 3.
yes; 4. yes; 5. yes; 6. yes.
Stan Wiggin-1. yes; 2. yes; 3.
yes; 4. yes; 5. yes; 6. no.
Thelma Williams-1. yes; 2. yes;
3. yes; 4. no opinion; 5. yes; 6. no
opinion.
Kay Woodruff-1. yes; 2. yes; 3.
yes; 4. no; 5. yes; 6. no.
Mary Carolyn Wright-1. no
opinion; 2. yes; 3. nonopinion; 4.
no opinion; 5. yes; 6. no opinion.
Candidates The Daily was un-
able to contact were Martin
Gluckstein, Val Johnson, Jeanne
Lange, John Montrose and Rich-
ard Schultz.

TORChLIGhT PARADE-Org;nizing football parades and rallies are one of the functions of the
Student Legislature. This picture was taken during the football season last semester before one of
the home games. Leading the paraders are former Student Legislature members LeRoy Daggs,
Chuck Lewis, Bob Tisch and Walt Klee.
SL toraiVoting Re ulations
All students voting in the Student Legislature and presi-
dentialpreference elections today will be subject to the following
----- - 1rules and voting instructions.
Conllttee systemis 1. Students may not campaign or electioneer within 50
BIasis for I rogrral's feet of the polling booths. Booths will be set up on the diag-
I"_onal, in the Angell Hall lobby, in front of Alumni Memorial
Plans to institute a training Hall, at the Engine Arch, at the Willow Run bus stop and
course for students interested in in front of University Hospital.
student government will be set I *
into motion by the Student Legis- 2. Ballots for the Student Legislature Election will be
lature next semester. comted under the Hare System of Proportional Representation.
Designed to eliminate the usual Students should number their choices in the order of their pref-
lature elections, the plan would crences. Voters may number as many choices as they desire
place students who think they but should vote for at least 12 candidates to give their ballot
might run for the Legislature on full weight.
one of the six standing commit-
tees, although they were not ac- 3. Ballots for the Daily sponsored presidential preference
tually Legislative members. Prev- poll will contain a list of 11 presidential possibilities. Students
iously, interested students have and faculty members will be asked to mark in the spaces
worked with the committees, but provided the candidate they would most like to see as next
the bulk of the work and planning
has rested with the Legislature president and the candidate they feel is most likely to become
members. next president. Space for write-in candidates is provided. Fac-
Present standing committees ulty and students will be provided with different colored ballots.
are Campus Action, Cultural and Faculty ballots will be yellow, student ballots blue.
Educational, National Student As- * *
sociation, Social, Varsity and 4. No student will be able to vote in either election without
Public Relations. Sub-commit tees an identification card, which will be punched by an election
on elections, discrimination. fund i
drives and specific events have official on duty.
been formed, with others made up
as the need arises. 5. Ballot box stuffing will be punishable by disqualifica-
Students interested in the lro- tion from the election, and appropriate action taken by the
gram may contact Dave Duv'1,(r, Men's Judiciary Council.
Legislature president.
Use Your Vote Today .. .

(EDITOR'S NOTE: The following
is an open letter to . the student
body from Dave Mutcher, LegisL-
ture president, concerning the im-
portance of today's elections.)
To the Student Body:
( )UR STUDENT Legislature de-
rives its basic authority from
you, the individuals comprising
the student body. Both you and
the University Administration
judge our organization by the ex-
tent to which we actually repre-
sent your opinions and by the de-
gree of success we achieve in
carrying through projects which
result from these opinions. How-
ever, as in baseball, we"cannot
reach second base without touch-
ing first. Before tackling these
projects we should first be fully
qualified to speak as your repre-
sentatives; this means that the
vote on election day must be a
great deal larger than 5,300. For
example, we are now approaching
the Administration with a more
equitable solution to the political
speaker problem. If we could speak
for the majority rather than a
minority of the student body, our
chances of success here as in
many of our 40-odd projects
would be much greater.
To "express student opinion"
is one of our three basic con-
stitutional objectives. Recently
we cooperated with other cam-
pus groups in the setting up of
a student opinion research
body, the results of which will
enable us to reflect accurately
your opinion on vital issues. To
"coordinate student activities"
we are sponsoring a new plan
whereby officers of each stu-
dent organization will meet
monthly to exchange mutual
ideas for the bettermen of our
campus community. To "dele-
gate representatives to all joint
faculty-student committees" is
our third objective. We repre-
sent you on the important Stu-
dent Affairs and Student Con-
duct Committees.
All campus-wide, student-spon-
sored events are calendered by
Legislature before these requests
go before Student Affairs Com-
mittee for final approval. This
spring, we are scheduling dances
to be held next year at the Intra-
mural Building in order' to pre-
vent last minute date conflicts.
The major step we have taken
this yast year in broadening our
operations is to affiliated with
the United States National Stu-
dent Association. N.S.A., as one
of our six standing committees,
has became the International
Letter Exchange headquarters for
the national organization and has
taken definite steps to combat
racial discrimination on our cam-
pus.
The fifty legislators who rep-
resent you have at least one
project apiece to which they

devote their efforts. These in-
clude the sponsoring of Pep
Rallies and send-offs for our
top-notch athletic teams, the
investigating of the possibilities
of low-priced football programs,
and the obtaining of definite
action from the local theaters
in getting better movies. We
are planning an ideology debate
and are sponsoring student gov-
ernment studies through Fresh-
man themes and Speech De-
partment activity.
This report on our progress is
not intended to be merely an an-
swer to those who wonder "what
we do." Above this, it should make
clear to you the importance of
voting on Tuesday, voting for
those who are capable and are
willing to "find time" to do justice
to their position as a Legislator.
Legislature responsibilities and
functions, are constantly growing.
But the foundation for this struc-
ture lies in the voting student
body. If you feel that a single one
of these activities is worthwhile,
it should be worth your time Tues-
day to stop at the ballot box and
choose your Legislature.
Hare System
To Be Used in
ElectionToday
The Hare system of propor-
tional representation, highly con-
troversial vote counting method,
will be used in today's Student
Legislature election.
One of the biggest thorns in the
sides of freshmen political science
students, the Hare system is
"complicatedibut efficient" ac-
cording to Dick Hait, Legislature
member in charge of ballot count-
ing.
Under the system students must
number their choices in the or-
der of their preference. As the
votes are counted, first place votes
are distributed. The candidate
with the fewest votes is elminated
and his ballots re-distributed ac-
cording to the second place
choices. To be elected, a candi-
date must attain a quota of bal-
lots which is approximately the
total number of ballots cast, di-
vided by the number of positions
to be filled.
After each count, the ballots of
the candidate with the fewest
votes are distributed according to
the next choice, that candidate
being eliminated. Therefore, Hait
emphasized, each ballot should list
at least 12 choices to insure :its ef-
fectiveness.
Candidates who fail to poll at
least 25 first place votes will also
be eliminated, Hait said.

. ........ .....

RAIN
OR

in

the

tud e7

gISlatu re

aid'I TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY

Presider a

Shaw

Vote

THE SUCCESS OF THE LEGISLATURE DEPENDS ON
AN INTELLIGENT AN) NTERESTED STUDENT BODY

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan