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April 22, 1948 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-04-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

v

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I

THURSDAY, APIL 22, P

TAKE A LETTER:
University Secretaries
Excel in Efficient Service
By PAT JAMES Mrs. Hdnsen's secrctaial ex-
Being an "ideal secretary" in- M.H
volves having a variety of talents, perience has not been confined to
but judging by the efficient, the University, as she was for-
friendly service provided by Uni- merly private secretary to a com-
versity office employes, it's a title pany vice-president.
that many of them would well de- "Secretarial work for a private
serve. employer means taking care of
One such capable employee is more personal things, such as
Mrs. Evelynne Hansen, secretary checkbooks and family affairs,
to Prof. Marquis of the psychology than is the case with a job at the
department. University," Mrs. Hansen observed.
On the subject of "do's and Work Never Dull
don'ts" for secretaries, Mrs. Han- "Much of my work here in-
sen heartily endorses the taboo on volves meeting the students and
office feuds steering them around," she said.
Private Employer
"Although there are several "Sometimes my job is quite rou-
other secretarial employes besides tine," Mrs. Hansen added, "but
myself in the psychology depart- my work is never dull because stu-
ment," she said, "we are able to dents are always coming in with
work together very smoothly be- different problems and requests."
cause we have learned to coop- Another University employe
erate with one another." who works closely with the stu-

3
a
y
a

Students Will
Discuss World
Government
500 Delegates To
Participate in Foruiui
Sparked off with the good
wishes of Gov. Kim Sigler, Al-'
bert Einstein, Mark Van Duren,
Warren Austin and Sen. Charles
Tobey, the United World Federal-
ist World Government College
Forum will get under way tomor-
row at the University.
Over 500 delegates from vir-
tually every part of the midwest
will convene in numerous sessions
to discuss the problems confront-;
ing the movement for World Gov-
ernment.
Keynote Speaker
The local UWF chapter will
play host to a formidable group
of speakers including Dr. Fred-
erick L. Schuman, Wallace Thor-
sen, Dr. Edward Teller, Dr. Paul
Arthur Schilpp, John Schmidt, Dr.
Robert Holmes Beck, Rev. Leslie
T. Pennington, and Philpps
Ruopp.
Dr. Schuman, keynote speaker
of the Forum will deliver arf ad-
dress on "World Government--
Dream or Duty." With the repu-
tation of having few peers as an
analyst of international affairs,
Dr. Schuman holds the Woodrow
Wilson Chair of Government at
Williams College.
Campus Rally
Dr. Teller, noted nuclear physi-
cist will speak on "Atomic Energy
and World Government." He was
one of the scientists influential in
the atomic bomb project at Los
Alamos.
A campus-wide World Govern-
ment rally will be led by Dr.
Schilpp, who will speak on "World
Government or World Anarchy."

The
City Beat
Washtenaw County's dog quar-
antine reached a new climax of
ft vp- d Aq 4

"WW"-two little letters hat
haunt an already mystery-worn
campus-are another stunt tof

E
l

JUDGES AND WINNER--William A. Hindenlang is shown hold-
ing his individual award presented at a meeting of the Institute
of -Aeronautical Sciences. Pictured from left to right are Ken-
neth R. Herman, Mr. Hindenlang, Robert Insley and B. J. Sim-
mons.
* '* * *
Aeronautical Sciences Institute
Holds Annual Convention Here

Teachrs To Meet
Better teaching and better
schools will be the topic of dis-
cussion at the 82nd meeting of
the Michigan Schoolmasters Club,
which gets underway here today.
Approximately 2,500 teachers
and administrators are expected
to attend the two-day meeting,
which includes the Hongrs Convo-
cation tomorrow morning.

'Ensian Lets Tabby Out of Bag
On Mystery of Letters 'WW'

dent body is Mrs. Ruth Callahan
in the Office of Student Affairs.
"I've always worked with stu-
dents," Mrs. Callahan declared,
and they always give me excellent
cooperation." I'd rather sit be-
hind this desk than anywhere else
on campus."
"My ideas never have a chance
to get stale," she said, "because
students are always coming in
with a fresh viewpoint on some-
thing."

)

b. A

The first annual meeting of
aeronautical student chapters of
the Institute of Aeronautical Sci-
ences was held at the University
on April 12.
The program included a tour of
the University Aeronautical Re-
search Center at Willow Run and
a demonstration of the super-
sonic wind tunnel. Attending were
representatives from the Univer-
sity, Wayne University and the
University of Detroit.
The delegates attended a dinner
at the Union at which Lieut. Col.
Model UN ...
(Continued from Page 1)

J
7
l
1
7
1
1

Campus
Calendar
EVENTS TODAY
British N.U.S. Summer Work
Project - Special meeting for all
students interested in European
Work programs; 7:30 p.m., 231
Angell Hall.
Michigras Central Committee-I
Meeting; 4:30 p.m., Union.
Carillon Recital - Mozart and
Sibelius selections, by Percival
Price, University carilloneur; 7:15
p.m.
Student Recital -- Marguerite
Hazel Hartsook, pianist; 8:30 p.m..
Rackham Assembly Hall.
Radio - Campus News; 5:45
p.m. WPAG.
Wallace Progressives-Meeting;
4:00 p.m., Rm. 308, Union.
Michigan-"This Happy Breed,"
1, 3:10, 5:10, 7:10 and 9:10.
State - "Out of the Blue," 1, 3,
5, 7,and 9.
Education Lecture-"Secondary
Education for All-Britain's Ex-
periment," talk by Harold C.
Dent, of the London Times; 7:30
p.m., Kellogg Auditorium.
EVENTS TOMORROW
Lawyers' Guild-Panel discus-
sion on the Taft-Hartley Act; 4:00
p.m., Rm. 150, Hutchins Hall.
Crib Club To Give
Law Aptitude Test
A legal aptitude test for anyone
interested will be given at 3:30
p.m. today Rm. 120 Hutchins Hall,
sponsored by the Michigan Crib
Club with the cooperation of the
Law School.
The test is given as a service
to the students, especially those
considering entering Law School.
The Law School will not keep a
record of the results of the test.
Before and after the 2-hour test
a member of the Michigan Crib
Club will be present to take mem-
berships. The Crib Club hopes
that as many pre-law students as
s- possible will join.

Sponsored by the
University of Michigan Hot Record Society
AT HILL AUDITORIUM
May 6, 1948, 8:30 P.M.
(Use this convenient form for ordering Concert Wickets)
Hot Record Society
University of Michigan Only Mail Orders
Room 2 Univ. Hall W il Beacceped
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Enclosed find check or nioney order for $........ for tickeis to the
Stan NvjixKntconcert, Thursday, May 6, 8:30 r.M. Number and section
as indicated below:
Main Floor, $1.80 .......... Approximate Preferred Seat
ist Balcony, $[89 .......... - ..--.'.-..'-.--.......' ' '
snd Balcony, $1.219 x............................. ...........
(pricecs tax inc.).........
Mail 'tickets to-
N A M E .......................,............ ..... .......... , ...........
ADDRES.............................................................
C IT Y .... . . . . . , . . . . . . . ... . . ... - - - - . --. - -.. . ..
(if the choice oftitcket~s as indicated is niot available whena this order is
received the order will be returned to the sender promptly to allow for
re-submission.)
Enclose a self-addressed, stamped envelope.
Your preference will be followed as closely as possible,
All Seats Reserved

The UN must be built upon andt
strengthened, Irwin Tobinson,
United States delegate, told the1
Assembly.1
Thundering in typical Gromy-
kian terms, Ukrainian representa-
tive Richard Underhill, 'blasted
the "unscrupulous use of satellite
nations by the imperialist powerst
to pursue their own dispicable
ends!"a
The final lineup of votes fa-
voring the amendment: Australia,
Belgium, China, Columbia, Haiti,
India; United Kingdom, United1
States, Handuras, Philippine Re-1
public and Turkey.
Against the measure were: Ar-
gentina, Chile, Denmark, Czecho-
slovakia, France, Iraq, Lebanon,
Mexico, Pakistan, Poland, Syria,i
Ukraine, Russia, Yugoslavia and]
Iran.
French Club
To Give Play
"Les Corbeaux," the first natur-
alistic French play produced, will
be presented by Le Cercle Fran-
cais, 8 p.m. Tuesday at Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
Henry Becque, author of "Les
Corbegux," exerted a profound
influence over Continental and
American dramatists with his new
school of naturalism. First pre-
sented in 1882, the social drama
deals with the trials of a well-to-
do bourgeois family after it loses
its money.
The cast is composed entirely of
members of Le Cercle Francais
under the direction of Prof. Koella
of the French department. "Les
Corbeaux" is the 42nd consecutive
annual French play presented un-
der the auspices of Le Cercle
Francais.
Tickets will be on sale at the
Mendelssohn box-office from 2
p.m. to 5 p.m. April 24 and 26,
and from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. April 27.
Members of Le Cercle Francais
will be given free tickets upon pre-
sentation of their membership
cards.
Merchants Exhibit
Foreign Displays
International Week displays
can now be seen in the windows of
several local stores.
University students from the
Philippines have an array of goods
made in their native islands on
exhibit in a State Street depart-
ment store. The display includes
clothes, household goods, carvings,
and other objects of interest.
At the same time, a State Street
bookstore is showing a selection
of art pieces from India, chiefly
enameled metalware and wood
and ivory carvings.

W. H. Pote, assistant chief of the
photographic laboratory at Wright
Field, spoke on "Aerial Photog-
raphy."
Student technical papers were
presented by delegates from the
three universities. William A.
Hindenlang of the University of
Detroit was awarded a trophy forj
outstanding aeionauticalachieve-
ment for his paper on "Air Cargo
-A Study of its Present and Fu-
ture." The University Branch
Award was also given to the Uni-
versity of Detroit.
Other student papers were
"Practical Aspects of the Laminar
Flow Wing," by Howard Birger of
the University, and "Altitude Ef-
fects on Long Range Performance
of Aircraft" by Arthur R. Pearce
of Wayne University.
Guest judges were Kenneth R.
Herman, vice-president and gen-
eral manager of Vickers, tne.,
Robert Insley, vice-president of
Continental Motors Corp., and B.
J. Simons, chief division engineer.
Stinson Aircraft Division, Consoli-
dated Vultee Corp.
Registration Still Open
For Gardening Course
Registration may still be made
for the "Gardening and Care of
Home Grounds" course which be-
gan last week.
Students and townspeople who
wish to enroll may do so at the
class' meeting at 3 p.m. today
in 1020 Angell Hall or at the
Extension Service offices in 107
Haven Hall.

eiie'ti Uviest s E rU ty as '"stimulate sales of the "new, sen-
houis passed without a dog bite sational, and different Michigan-
report and complaints on strays ensian for 1948."
fell to seven for the day.Each "WW" whether it was
The lull followed a wild Monday plastered on a billboard, stuck in
wherein four small children were a store window, or hauled sand-
bitten-one by a rabbit--and law wich-style on the sturdy back of
enforcement officers received a 'Ensian rooters stand for Wolver-
total of 21 complaints within a ine Wonder, the new 'Ensian. Go-
few hours. ing into the home-stretch, Bill
Two little girls, who didn't
know where they lived, were P e tfor Play
brought to the Police station at
11:45 a.m. yesterday after cross- Tonight's performance of the
ing the busy Huron, State St. speech department's production
corner and wandering into a su- of "The Importance of Being Ear-
permarket. nest" will be the last which stu-
Harried father, George Biggs, dents may see at reduced rates.
hustled into the station 45 min- The Oscar Wilde comedy is be-
utes later and told of leaving them lng presented at 8 p.m. daily
in the car in front of St. Joseph's through Saturday at Lydia Men-
Hospital. The girls live in Dex- delssohn Theatre. Tickets will be
ter- on sale from 10 a.m. today.
* * * _
The proprietor of "Tiny's Tav-
ern," William Liefso, was ordered
to pay $50 in fines and close his
establishment for 60 days, start-
ing May 1, by the State Liquor ACLoBUM
Control Commission yesterday.
Minors were served beer in the
tavern, according to Commissionfor your
officers.
* * co e to
The American Legion's Edsel
Ford Post tavern license was re-
voked by the Ypsilanti Township
Board as a result of "repeated Pines of Rome
complaints for disorderliness."
Symphony No. 6.
Ho s. d ! l sI'i[Five Portraits
Symphony No. 9 (chor
HoliMectmg lirHere Concerto for Violin (Sz
Trends in teaching of business Alexander Nevsky
administration will be studied at
the annual meeting of the Amer- Roman Festivals
ican Association of CollegiateCocroN.2frPa
Schools of Business, being held at Concerto No. 2 for Pia
the University for a three day
session beginning today. and 1
Charles F. Kettering, vice-pres-
ident of General Motors Corpora- Concerto for Orchestra
Lion., will be the speafker~ at a'
dinner meeting of the Association Sorcerer's Apprentice
tonight at 7:00 in the Michigan
Union.Hungarian Rhapsody Nt
Union.
Tomorrow night the delegates Polovitsian Dances
will be guests of the University at Der Freischutz Overturt
i dinner where President Alex-
ander G. Ruthven and Provost RussIan and Ludmilla O
James P. Adams will speak.
Most conference sessions will be
devoted to discussions of current
problems and achievements in T E A IO
business education by deans rep-
resenting the various member
schools of the Association. 715 North University

Zerman, 'Ensian prolotion man-
ager announced that only 800
WW's of 6,000 are left to be sold
and soon there will only be 796.
Two WW's will be handed out
at the Michigras, one to the
1,000th and the other to the
4,000th visitor at the Field I-louse
each night.
Hoping to spur sales by sug-
gestion, Zerman reported that al-
ready Senator Vandenberg and
Governor Tom Dewey had ordered
'Ensians. Other campaign head-
quartei-s have not indicate (d
whether they will follow suit.
Bing Crosby was pursuaded to
purchas e a Wolverine Wonder
while playing golf with the ath-
letic Elliott brothers. Zerman ex-
plained that as a family-man
Crosby felt it necessary to buy
before May 15, whentthe price of
the yeairbook jumnps to $6.50.
Books aie on sale from 9-12
a.m. and 1-5 p.m. at the business
office, Student Publications Build-
ing.

S
igeti )
no (Serkir
I GL
in D Maj
o. 2 .
)verture

Respighi
Beethoven
Virgil Thomson
Beethoven
Brahms
Prokofiev
Respighi
)0 Brahms
ES
or Handel
Dukas
Liszt
Borodin
Weber
Glinka

K

l

RECORD SHOP
Phone 2 -0542

"E" Day is May 15.

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What is WW?
IW.otid er

I

INVITrATIONS

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