100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 17, 1948 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-04-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

U

WAGES SX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

,

SATURDAY, APRIL 17, 1948

INTERNATIONAL WEEK:
Annual Students of World Get-Together

International week"- A cam-
paign to improve understanding
and relationships between Ameri-
cans and their foreign visitors-
.aere will take place this week
through concerted action of both
city and University groups.
The annual celebration, co-
sponsored by several organiza-
tions, will start late Sunday af-
ternoon, as church guilds and
Greek letter houses welcome Uni-
versity foreign students at tea.
At 6:30 p.m. radio station WPAG
will present "World Trade for
World Peace," a dramatic skit
first given last year by NBC on its
United Nations Series. University
students make up the cast of the
program.
The International Students As-
sociation will present the first big
event of the week, a Turkish din-
ner, at 7 p.m. in the Women's Ath-
letic Building. The meal, prepared

by the students, will feature typi-
cal Turkish dishes such as bak-
lava, kahve and pilav, with a show
and entertainment afterwards by
the Turkish students.
Turk Cagers
Medals will be presented to the
Turkish basketball team for hav-
ing won the International basket-
ball tournament. Tickets are $1.50
and can be obtained at the Inter-
national Center.
Students looking for exotic en-
tertainment will find it at 8 p.m.
Monday night in Pattengill Audi-
torium, when the International
Center presents foreign students
in a round-the-world pageant.
Spectators will be treated to an
Hawaiian May-Day celebration, a
Chinese opera, an Arab wedding, a
candle dance of India, an Italian
operatic aria, a Roumanian folk-
dance, and a Latin-American car-
nival. Tickets can be bought at the

Variety Spices
Radio Roster
This Week-end
Michigras History
Will BeHighlighted
The story of the annual Mich-

U.S. NEEDS LAWYERS:
Barkdull Calls Communism,
War Our Greatest Problems

Buy an 'Ensian,.. .

Buy at 'Ensian.. 0

i

...m....

"WHAT'S NEW

Hats! Special! Straws and
felts in black, brown, and
pastels. . . $54.Q Others,
$2.00 and up. ROBERT'S
MiLLINERY, 604 E. Liberty.
5* 7
. Y .

ABOUT
TOWN"

door or at the International Cen-
ter.
Phone Poll
At the same time Monday night,
several Ann Arbor women's clubs
will join in conducting a telephone
poll on the question of world
trade. They expect to contact one
out of every five families listed in
Ann Arbor.
The week's activities will con-
tinue at 8 p.m. Tuesday in the
Rackham auditorium, with Hick-
manrPrice,aJr. speaking on "Ann
Arbor's Stake in World Trade."
Price, who has just returned from
Europe, is the vice president in
charge of exports of the Kaiser-
Frazer Corporation. His speech is
sponsored by the League of Wom-
en Voters.
Rackham Auditorium will be in
use again at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday
when the Student Legislature
stages a Model UN Assembly. Here
the foreign students will represent
their own countries, with assist-
ance from other campus groups.
Consuls will come out from De-
troit to sit with their "delega-
tions."
Meet Each Other
The International Center will
present a tea from 4:30 to 6 p.m.
Thursday, to give the public a
chance to meet foreign students,
and vice-versa. The Junior Cham-
ber of Commerce, chief sponsor of
International Week, will honor
townspeople and students with an
invitational International Ban-
quet at 7 p.m. in the Union.
Climax of the week is Friday,
when the United World Federal-
ists register for their week-end
convention and the ISA gives its
celebrated International Ball.
Tickets for the Ball, held from 9
p.m. to 1 a.m. in the Union, can
be purchased for $3.60 at the Un-
iversity Hall ticket booth or at
the International Center.
The week will end with UWF's
World Government College Forum
and radio broadcast at 6:30 p.m.
Sunday over WPAG.
UWF Outlines
World Forum
Two-Day Bill
Delegates of United World Fed-'
eralist chapters fromvirtually
Ievery section of the midwest will
convene at the University from
April 23 to 25 for a World Gov-
ernment College Forum led by
prominent United States educa-
tors.
The weekend will open with a
debate on World Government by
teams from the University of Chi-
cago and Michigan State College.
Wallace Thorsen of the United
Nations World magazine will
speak on the "United Nations-
Past, Present, and Future," fol-
lowed by Dr. Edward Teller noted
nuclear physicist of the University
of Chicago, on "Atomic Energy
and World Government."
The second session of the For-
um will hear an address on
"World Government-Dream or
Duty" by Dr. Frederick L. Schu-
man, eminent analyst of interna-
tional relations and holder of the
Woodrow Wilson chair of Gov-
ernment at Williams College.
Panel discussions will follow each
of the sessions.
I.

i
b
G
v
,p
i
c
<<
IG
t
Q
1

FLYING DAUGHTER OF FLYING GOVERNOR-Madeline Sig-
ler, daughter of Michigan's flying governor Kim Sigler is pictured
at the controls of a plane at Lodwick Airfield, Lakeland, Fla.
Miss Sigler, vacationing at Lakeland with her mother, has 73
solo hours in the air.
CONCRETE VS. ABSTRACT:
Surrealism Is Symptom
Of Modern Man's Malaise

igras, from its country fair daysc
back in the early 1900's, up to
this year's bespangled extrava-
ganza, will be told over "Campus
Quarter" at 9:45 a.m. today over
WPAG.
Jack Leonard of the MichigrasI
publicity committee will also be{
interviewed on the program,
which is on a well-filled roster
of campus programs, including
"Journal of the Air," at 6:15 p.m.
and "Michigan Profiles" at 10
p.m. today over WHRV.
The script for today's "Quar-
ter" program was written by
James Epstein, Barbara Barnes
and Marge Zaller.
Journal of the Air
An exclusive Selective Service
story from Washington will be
featured on "Journal of the Air"
at 6:15 p.m. today over WHRV.
"Spotlight on the "Ballot Box" in
Italy, Nebraska and Wisconsin
will also be heard on the speech
student-produced show as well as
features on the "Newspaper in the
Past" and Supersonic air travel.
The program was written by
Dick Maloy, Edd Miller, Art Shef
and Robert LaPlante, and was di-
rected by Dorothy Gutekunst.
"Michigan Profile," a Broad-
casting Service program,.at 10
p.m. today over WHRV will fea-
ture a Men's Glee Club quartette
and a faculty biographical sketch.
Arabian Fantasy
An imaginative postscript to
the Arabian nights will be pre-
sented at 10:45 p.m. tomorrow
over WHRV. It's the "Thousand
and Second Night," an original
fantasy by Raymond Kurtzman.
The show is directed by John
Rich, and the cast includes Au-
drey Lawrence, Don Kleckner and
Norma Jean Auer.

r
v
e
c

The containment of Commu-
nism and prevention of another
world war were labeled the great-
est problems of our day, yester-
day, by Howard L. Barkdull,
chairman of the House of Dele-
gates of the American Bar Asso-
ciation.
Speaking at the Founder's Day
dinner of the Lawyer's Club, Bark-
dull called for the training. of
young lawyers for public service."
to aid in settling these difficult
issues confronting the United
States in international affairs."
"Greater emphasis can be
placed upon public law and the
training of lawyers for public life,

particularly in the realm of inter-
national relations," he said.
"There must be greater incen-
tive for able men to enter public
service," he added. "rather than
having the cream of the crop serv-
ing private enterprise."
"A government of law means in
the final analysis a government by
lawyers," Burkdull said, adding
that the legal profession is not
contributing all that it is capable
of.
"It is time that the legal pro-
fession resumed the position of
leadership which it held in the
early days of this nation."

L 11 7

I

I

I

I

Eyes on ties!

a
f'

That's the

feminine trend. To lure her
lovely lashes, we suggest that
you grab a rackful of these
sweethearts today at SAF-
FELL and BUSH.

v

I

2und

Spectators! All kinds! High,
medium, or baby doll heels,
slings or closed. They come
in brown 'n white, blue 'n
white, or black 'n white.
From $8.95 to $12.95. At
JACOBSON'S shoe salon.

White Beach Robes. Forthe
summer sun! Short robes
are $7.95, long robes, $10.95.
"They launder nicely!" At
the SMARTEST HOSIERY
SHOP, 539 E. Liberty.

By ART HIGBEE
Such present-day philosophies
as surrealism and existentialism
are attempts to find, in the dream-
image world of infants and primi-
tive men, something superior to
abstract analysis, Dr. E. A. Have-t
lock said yesterday.
Dr. Havelock, associate profes-
sor of classics at Harvard, said that
the tense self-consciousness of
modern man can be explained by
his struggle to relate this .dream-
image world of concrete experi-
ence to abstract anaylsis.
He said that man thirsts to re-
solve this struggle but is "baffled
by the thought involved."
Too Much Work
The result is that men "reject
thought because they tire of the
NROTC Un it
Off icerList,
Is Ann ounced
Battalion unit student officers
have been posted for the Naval
ROTC unit on campus, according
to an announcement by Capt. H.
B. Wheeler, USN, commanding
officer.
Officers are Douglas D. Swift,
'48E., Ann Arbor, Battalion Com-
mander; James Urquhart, '48Lit.,
Highland Park, Battalion Sub-1
Commander; Lawrence W. Het-
rick, '48E., Oak Harbor, 0., Bat-
talion Adjutant; and Richard F.
Ladd, '48E., Tulsa Okla., Battal-
ion Lieutenant.
Also appointed were Dennis E.
Youngblood, '48Lit., Alger, Com-
pany Commander, First Comn-
pany; William G. Crocker, '48Lit.,
Burlington, Ia., Company Com-
mander, Second Company; Ken-
neth E. Thorp, '49E., Mt. Clemens,
Executive Officer, First Company;
Orlie G. Baird, '48Lit., Ypsilanti,
Executive Officer, Second Com-
pany.
Platoon Commanders are Nor-
man L. Pollard, '49E., Lansing;
Jack E. Harlan, '48Lit., San Ma-
teo, Calif.; Donald D. Sagaser,
'48E., Appleton City, Mo.; Wil-
lard C. Smith, Jr., '48 Lit., Aurora,
Ill.; and Edwin W. Hakala, '48Lit.,
Ann Arbor.

effort of thinking," he remarked.
Their next step, Dr. Havelock
said, is to try to avoid the issue by
attempting to boil things down to
a personal philosophy.
But the issue remains, and so
does the tension, he said.
This, then, is the trouble with
our civilization-the ever-increas-
ing compulsion to think abstract-
ly versus the yearning for con-
crete, dynamic simplicity, Dr.
Havelock continued.
Pity the Poor Artist
Chief victim of this struggle, he
said, is the artist, who is at once
attracted by two opposing forces:
subjective experience and abstract
thought.
This struggle is nothing new;
however. The Greeks started it
more than 2,000 years ago, when
out of concrete experience they
first developed abstract thought.
And thus the Greeks were the first
moderns, Dr. Havelock remarked.
He said that they were the first
to differentiate emotion from
logic, sense from reason, the con-
ventional from the moral and the
expedient from the ideal.
Vanderbilt To
G1iveLectures
Arthur T. Vanderbilt, newly ap-
pointed Chief Justice of the New
Jersey Supreme Court, will deliver
the fourth annual series of Wil-
liam W. Cook Lectures, entitled
"Men and Measures in the Law" in
five talks beginning Monday.
The lectures are the result of
the founding of the William W.
Cook Foundation for Lectures on
American Institutions, by the
Michigan alumnus.
Last year's lecturer was John
Maurice Clark, professor of eco-
nomics at Columbia University on
the topic "Alternative to Serf-
dom."

Spring . is . here! Everyone
wants to get around a little
more. How? It's simple-
just rent a bicycle from the
CAMPUS BIKE SHOP.

w
.. {
3
.:-
( , ,
,,
.--==
,, ' , i

Herkimer Hoedagger bought
'Ensian.

an

/"- ,
l'. }
'' .
-

I

GOOD
Listening
on

Think that this can't hap-
pen here? It can and does
when you wear one of those
fine solid color oxford cloth
shirts featured at VAN BO-
VEN'S.

11

Lilee to listen? The MUSIC
CENTER, (just west of Hill
Auditorium) has everything
on wax from be-bop to Dad's*
old favorites including old
standbys and new sensa-
tions.

? .. ..

1600
KI LOCYCLES

. :.ems s ,
. ,
w "
*
*;
5 +
A

Just in! Richard Hudnut Sa-
lon Home Permanent (Creme

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

rinse). More fluids

more

curlers- takes only half the
time! Only $2.75 at CAL-
KINS-FLETChER DRUGS.

Get a large supply of fresh
Carmel Corn for the spring
baseball games! The CAR-
MEL CORN SHOP is lo-
cated at 621 E. Liberty.

.e
a :.

(Continued from Page 4)
day and Wednesday, April 20 and
21. All people interested should
sign up as soon as possible on the
ASME bulletin board, outside the
Heat Engine Lab. in W. Engineer-
ing.
Michigan sailing Club: Work
parties Saturday and Sunday at
Whitmore Lake. Meet at 9 a.m.,
Sunday, Michigan Union for ride.'
U. of M. Hot Record Society:
Mr. Phil Diamond will present a
program 8 p.m., Sun., April 18,
Grand Rapids Room, Michigan
League. Everyone welcome.
Sociedad Hispanica: conversa-
tional group, April 19, 3 p.m., In-
ternational Center.
I.Z.F.A.: Picnic - Seminar on
"Resolved: Zionism is a Liberal
Movement," Meet at Hillel Foun-
dation, Sun., April 18, 2 p.m. Sign
list at Hillel for reservations. Re-
freshments (small fee).
Russian Circle: Meeting Mon.,
April 19. 8 p.m.,, International
Center. Russian stage program

Make Your Own SK I RTS 0
JUST ARRIVED
NEW CHINTZES and HANDWOVEN 4
GUATAMALA PRINTS
INDIR 1RT SHOP
330 //aynard Stret

i
i
i

Stamps May
Bring Food
Foreign postal stamps will be
turned into food for Europe
through a stunt originated by the
Student Religious Association
Public Affairs Committee.
The stamps will be auctioned
off on April 28 and the proceeds
used to fill food requests from
Europe, Committee Chairman Lew
Towler announced. The commit-
tee needs more stamps and is ap-
pealing to students to donate any
that they have received from
abroad.
All stamp donations may be left
at Lane Hall, Towler said. To
date the committee has responded
to personal overseas requests by
sending approximately 130 pounds
of food and clothing.

Behind the eight-ball? There
is a variety of solutions to
your gift problems at the
CHESTER ROBERTS SHOP.
They have gifts and cards
for any occasion.

Here's our footwear favorite,
the moccasin oxford. Smart
and sturdy, the TOWN and
CAMPUS SHOP has them

4

I" 4
o w

---" """"""""

I

for all uptown,
and out-of-town

downtown,
occasions,

I t's

as easy

as P ie

to use

CA41 TO
" b. 1' 4

Personalized Matchbooks!
Ideal for sororities and fra-
ternities. "Your name and
affiliation emblem." Clay-
coats are only 50 for $2.00;
Metallics, 50 for $2.50. Re-
duction on large orders!
THE CRAFT PRESS, 330
Maynard.

Do your shirts get the horse-
laugh? Don't stand for it!
Rush your wash to the VAR-
SITY LAUNDRY for a really
snappy finish.

/l
v' )
I,# ,

(a upAscito

I1 II

I

I

I I I II

ii

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan