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April 13, 1948 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-04-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

EIGHT

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY. APRIL 13, 1548

4

TORKS, ET AL:
Two Emergency Calls
Give Deputy a Busy Day

By CRAIG WILSON
Life is just one little thing
after another for Deputy Kenneth
W. Dilloway, who pilots the
Washtenaw County Sheriff's Of-
fice ambulance.
Dilloway normally handles rou-
tine desk work in the Sheriff's
office but yesterday he played the
starring role in a "beat the stork"
chase to St. Joseph's Mercy Hos-
pital, and another emergency
SRA To Hold
Discrimiination
Discussions
Discrimination - its sources,
components and remedies - will
be discussed by four widely-
known speakers and a number of
University professors at an In-
stitute on Cultural Conflict to be
held Friday and Saturday in
Lane Hall.
Under the sponsorship of the
Inter-Cultural Education Depart-
ment of the Student Religious As-
sociation, the two-day program
will attack the discrimination
problem from all angles in meet-
ings open to the public.
Featured speakers at the In-
stitute will be Prof. Allison Davis
of the University of Chicago ed-
ucation school; Frank Loescher
of the American Friends Service
Committee; Dr. Herbert Seamans,
of the National Council of Chris-
tians and Jews; and Prof. Leon
Festinger, of the Institute for
Group Dynamics at the Massa-
chusetts Institute of Technology.
Several University professors
will join the speakers in round
table discussions Friday and Sat-
urday. Several topics will be con-
sidered.
Bar Appointment
The Junior Bar Conference of.
the American Bar Association an-
nounces the appointment of Char-
les W. Joiner, assistant professor
of Law, as Consultant to the Mem-
bership Committee of the Jun-
ior Bar Conference.

dash, when the cbuy's regular am-
bulance was out on call.
Stik handicap
His first summons came at 7:25
a.m. from Mrs. Alvin Rheimold,
who lives at 38 Burton Ave. three
miles outside Ann Arbor near U.S.
12. After chasing out at top speed.
Dilloway had to "take it easy"
coming back over the rough roads.
"I got her to St. Joseph's just
in time-as things really began
popping," he reported after the
trip. But hospital officials say the
sweat was all for naught.. Mrs.
Reimold's son officially arrived
at 10:40 a.m.-three hours later.
Both are doing quite well.
No Rest for the Weary
But as soon as our tired am-
bulance driver is settling back
in an office chair, comes another
call. Mrs. Grace Sherman, 322
E. Williams St., was in a coma,
according to her doctor, and
needed immediate transportation
to St. Joseph's Hospital. Off goes
Deputy Dilloway in the 1942 Ford
ambulance, which he describes as
being "for emergency use only."
Mrs. Sherman is "not doing so
well," hospital officials said, al-
though they could not reveal the
nature of her affliction.
"Just a little excitement in an
ordinary day," Dilloway, who has

No Aiaoiiatie
Rent Hike Seen
For AnnI Arbor
Ar eaIirector Ilaines
Exlains New Law
No automatic rent changes are
in the offing for Ann Arborites
although the new compromise
Federal Housing and Rent Act of
1948 has gone into effect, William
C. Haines, area rent director of
the Detroit Rent Expediter's of-,
fice, announced.j
Here are the alterations as far
as the local scene is concerned:
Fifteen per cent rent increases
can be effected if landlord and
tenant enter into a voluntary
agreement.,
Changes in rent levels can be
made when the local rent office
issues an individual adjustment
order.
Further changes can be made
if the housing expediter approves
a general increase in the rent
level in a rent area in response
to a recommendation of a local
rent advisory board.
Motor courts, new constructions
or conversions in the past two
years and unrented before June
30, 1947, and non-housekeeping
furnished rooms in private homes
where there dre no more than
two paying guests, were decon-
trolled by the new law.
the 30-day veterans preference
,c rent or purenase newly con-
structed housing units was con-
inued through April 1. 194:.
Hold Your Bonds

NEW FOOD CENTER-Replacing the former storage unit in the University Hospital, the new Food
Service Building at Glen and Ann Streets will store and process most food served by University
eating places.

LONDON, April 12--P)-Mrs.
Eleanor Roosevelt today unveil-
ed a bronze statute of her late
husband in Grosvenor Square.
King George VI and Winston
Churchill were among the thou-
sands who watched as she tugged
a red, white and blue bunting
Caimpus
Cailenda r
EVENTS TODAY
Lecture-Abbe Arthur Maheux,
of Laval University, Quebec, will
speak on "Canada-United States
Relations." 8 p.m.. Kellogg Audi-
torium.
Quarterdeck Society-7 :30 p.m..
West Engineering. Prof. E. T. Vin-
cent will speak on "Gas Tur-
bines."
Crusade for Children-George
Burke will discuss the plight of
children in war-devastated areas,
2 p.m., County Courthouse, before
Washtenaw County Board of Su-
pervisors.
At the Michigan-"Cass Tim-
berlane."
At the State-"The Exile."
EVENTS TOlrORROW
Expectant Mothers' Class-2:30
p.m. and 7:30 p.m., Child Health
Building. "The Early Develop-
ment of Your Baby and His Place
in the Family."
Sigma Xi Lecture-8 p.m.,
Rackham Amphitheatre. Prof.
Donald L. Katz of the chemical
engineering department, "High
Pressure Oil and Gas Fields."

THOUSANDSIWATCH
Mrs. FDR Unveils Bronze
Statue of Husband in London

from Britain's memorial to the
formerAmericain President on the
third anniversary of his death.
Statue 10 Feet High
The statue is 10 feet high. Be-
neath it is the simple inscription:
"-Franklin Delano Roosevelt."
During the afternoon thousands
of Britons filed slowly past the
statue. Some dropped bouquets
of daffodils at the base as they
passed.
In a message read at the din-
ner, President Truman expressed
his countrymen's deep apprecia-
tion "of the honor which the peo-
ple of Great Britain have today
bestowed upon the memory of a
great American."
Truman's Message
'In the future," he said, "when
Americans come to Grosvenor
Square to witness the honor you
have paid us by erecting a statue
to Franklin D. Roosevelt, they will
come remembering the gallantry
of your men, women and children
in Britain's darkest hour."
Prime Minister Attlee propos-
ed a toast "to the memory of
Franklin D. Roosevelt," and Brit-
ain's war-time prime minister,
Winston Churchill, said:
"I am glad that here in Lon-
don we have now added to the
memorials of Washington and
Lincoln a statue to this great
president, whose services to the
cause of freedom were given in an
even wider sphere than those of
his eminent predecessors."
Princess Elizabeth and Prince
Philip, and the Duke and Duchess
of Gloucester, represented the
royal family at the dinner,

.;

* * *
Food Service Building Opens
As Storage, Processing Center
4.'

been with the force only
months, commented.

eight

Will You Buke25 .
What is the mystic symbolism
of the number 253?
Whatever it is, the 253rd person
to cross the Michigan seal on the
Diagonal after 1 p.m. Friday, Ap-
ril 16, will automatically become
one of the four judges for the
Michigras Parade, Ann McGrew,
co-chairman of the parade an-
nounced.
The other three judges have
not been chosen yet, but Miss Mc-
Grew said that they would be
prominent campus, city and state
figures.
The Michigras Parade will be-
gin at 3:30 p.m. April 23. Anyone
still wishing to enter the parade
may contact Dick Slocum at 4141.

-

ow To Save on
FILMBIL
Just any scene won't do! A camera can't think, but it
performs well when you hink for it. Now! A book that
takes the guesswork out of photography. You'll know-
not imagine-what settings to use. Gives information
about all phases of camera work including color photo-
graphy. Buy it today and save I by making every shot
count.
KODAK REFERENCE HANDBOOK . .. $3.50
Calkins-Fleteler Drug Company
The Dependable Stores
324 South State 818 South State

The new $1,250,000 Food Serv-
ice Building went into full opera-
tion for the first time yesterday.
Located on the corner of Glen
and Ann streets', the new struc-
ture will serve as a centralized
storage depot and processing
point for most of the food served
in University eating places. It re-
places the storage unit that was
formerly located in the University
Hospital.
The food center occupies 70,000
square feet of space. In addition
to storage facilities, it houses a
kitchen for testing recipes and
foods, a bakery, a meat process-
ing shop and an ice cream man-
ufacturing departmet.
Co1ombian .. .
(Continued from Page 1)
spite the fact that the USSR con-
ducts no business with Colombia.
Citing Panama City broadcasts,
they revealed that while workers
have been called back from a gen-
eral strike throughout the coun-
try, sniping and fighting still con-
tinue.
The Pan-American Conference,
they said, is nevertheless going on
in the Hondurian embassy, where
the delegates are discussing the
problem of Communism: Ms.
Saenz stated that Colombia has
only about 8,000 Communist Par-
ty members, thugh they are very
active.
All of the people interviewed
stressed the fact that Colombia is
proud of Sher fifty-year record of
peace and universal civil liberties.
They also felt that the majority
of Colombians were against revo-
lution, as both the Conservative
and Liberal parties have united in
tihe last few days in a coalition;
government to stop the disorder.
They felt that the American press
had magnified the affair, and
that the American press had mag-
nified the affair, and that the
Pan-American Conference would
continue.
But they were sticking close to
their radios.
Morse Calls for
IN AACPStatement
WASHINGTON, April 12-()-
Senator Morse (Rep., Ore.) today
called on the National Association
for the Advancement of Colored
People to make an "unequivocal
rejection" of a Negro leader's po-
sition on service of Negroes in
the armed forces.
The NAACP had not imme-
diately replied.
Morse was referring to a state-
ment by A. Philip Randolph, pres-
ident of the Brotherhood of Sleep-
ing Car Porters (AFL), that many
Negroes would refuse to bear
arms, if drafted, unless the Army
abandoned its segregation policy.
Morse told the Senate he had
received a telegram from Walter
White, head of the NAACP, which
did not make it clear whether
White was definitely against the
course outlined by Randolph.
"I would like to have an un-
equivocal rejection of Mr. Ran-
dolph's program in all of its as-
pects from Mr. White," Morse
said.
The senator said he is a director
of NAACP, but added he would
resign immediately if the organ-
ization identified itself "in any
degree whatsoever" with Ran-
dolph's plan.
current
rat

University residence halls, the
Michigan League and the Uni-
versity hospital will all draw on
its services.
Herbert P. Wagner, business
manager of the hospital, has been
appointed business manager of
the Food Service Building and
Bruce K. Lemon, Detroit bus-
inessman, has been named gen-
eral manager of Food Service.
Wagner is a University graduate.

BEATER'S

G

S

L

BARGAINS IN STATIONERY AND BOOKS

U' Acquires
Golf Course
The University has expanded
to the extent of 155 acres with
the purchase of the Stadium Hills
Golf Course.
Present plans call for the use
of the property for a self- liquid-
ating housing project for faculty
members, according to Robert P.
Briggs, University vice-president.
The property may be leased as
a golf course until construction
of the housing project is begun.

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BALL

41

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ANNETTE MUNN
of Martha Cook
models a luscious black
formal of net over
flesh-colored
marquisette in antici-
pation of Heart Bid,
the Assembly Ball
to be held
Saturday, April 17

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YESTERDAY

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Coeds with flowers. . .

we showered

SATURDAY at Assembly Ball it's
up to you men to uphold the
gallantry-BUT at
LOWEST PRICES!!!

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YOU CAN'T BEAT THEM!

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Rose Corsage
Gardenia Corsac
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. . . . . . . 2.25
ge. . . . . .2.50
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