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March 24, 1948 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-03-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TIE MWCTTWPAN DAHXY

Wfl~r~faTMA"WrCU A15W~

INTERNATIONAL REPORT:
Foreign Students Desribe Comimun st Ru le

Campus
Calen dcir

x
1

TO)NSOR! 11 TUNTVES:
Tob l inAhi Arbr lit
W a bl i A i n Arb or Tonighit

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the third
in a series on what European stu-
dents at the University think of the
international situation.)
By ANDIEE SEEGER
Two University students told the
stories of Communist rule in their
homelands, yesterday.
Robert W. Miller, an American
citizen who spent 16 years in Cze-
choslovakia, blasted the Czech
Communist youth movement,

while Max Rosenstein, Bulgarian
graduate student, exposed alleged
vote-getting methods used by
Communists in his country.
Miller said that, since Czech
universities re-opened in 1945, the
Communists have carried on an
intensive infiltration into the na-
tion-wide Czech Union of Stu-
dents. Entrants into the three
Czech universities automatically
become a member of the Commu-

I.

Extra
Unusual Cartoon
"FLORA"

Next Sunday --
James Stewart
"Call Northside 777"

nist-controlled Revolutionary La-
bor Movement (ROH). The chair-
man of this organization, Zapa-
tocky, was made deputy prime-
minister after the recent coup.
This, according to Miller, led to
a crisis among the students, most
of whom opposed the Communists.
University Purged
Miller said that the students and
professors purged from Charles
University were those people who
fought in the Czech army abroad
during the war. Many of them
broadcast from England. The ac-
tual career Nazi collaborators, he
said, have joined the Communist
Party and found protection there.
Rosenstein said that two gov-
ernments preceded Communist
control of his country. The first
tcok a middle-of-the-road posi-
tion: the second was Socialistic.
When the Communists took over,
they invented charges against the
former government leaders and
had them killed.
According to Rosenstein, the
Communists got votes by a coali-
tion of left-wing parties. They
wouldn't let anyone run for office
who was not a member of the co-
alition. "Something is left now of
the old Agrarian party,'' said Ros-
enstein; "but that group used to
be the strongest party, and one
which worked for a democratic
Bulgaria."
Critics Disappear
He added that critics of the gov-
ernment often disappear.
"It is certain," he said, "that
Russia has some sort of expansion-
ist policy. In some things they are
right; they want things like free-'
dom of access to the Mediterra-
nean through Bosphorus. They
should get such things. But there
is also, beside the economic claims,
the territorial expansion."
Ten Barbour
A-wards Made
Ten women from Oriental coun-
tries have been selected as Bar-
bour Scholars according to an an-
nouncement by the Barbour
Scholarship Committee.
Four of the scholarships, effec-
tive next September, went to
China, represented by Miss Mung-
Chio Chao, Hwei-Ju Chang, Hel-
en Chen, and Rose Hu.
Other awards went to Miss
Toshiko Kabashina of Tokyo, the
first post-war Japanese Barbour
Scholar; Miss Youngscook Chang
of Seoul, Korea, Miss Consuelo
Tan and Miss Jovita Natividad
from the Philippines; Miss Shy-
ama Deodhar and Miss Kapila
Malik from India.
Two alternates were als voted
by the Committee, Miss Rabied
Tantranon of Siam and Miss
Perin Dhondy of India.

Expectant Mothers Classes-
Combined meeting 2:30 p.m..
Public Health Bldg. Adelia
Beeuwkes of Public Health School
will speak on nutrition.
Lecture - Job opportunities, 4
p.m., Natural Science Auditorium.
Speakers are representatives of
Kemper Insurance, Kroger's and
Hudson's.
Michigan Crib - 7:30 p.m..
Kellogg Auditorium. Dean E.
Blythe Stason will speak on "Col-
lege Preparation for the Study of
Law."
ASME - 7:15 p.m., Rm. 229.
West Engineering Bldg. Discus-
sion of "Development of Sheet
Metal Working," and "Diesel En-
gines in India."
AIEE-IRE-7:30 p.m., 348 West
Engineering Bldg. Winning papers
in student papers contest will be
given. Movies, "Story of FM" and
"Quality Motors in the Making."
Radio-2:30 p.m. WKAR, Hop-
wood Room. Interview with Sid-
ney Corman. 10 p.m., WJR, re-
port on the nation's educational
crisis.
La Sociedad Hispanica-8 p.m.,
Union. Mexican Movies will be
shown.
Michigan Theatre-"You Were
Meant for Me," 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9,
p.m.
State Theatre-"Relentless," 1,
3, 5, 7, and 9 p.m.
Veterans Checks Held
Checks being held for the fol-
lowing veterans at the Ann Arbor
Post Office will be returned to
Columbus on March 30; Robert W.
Baker, James Clark Coffman, Ells-
worth K. Dodman, Gerald Gurin,
Kenneth N. Sippy, Ralph C. Smith
and Wilbert A. Yoki.

J.1 M ( %I4 'II S(7N
The llu t Tthn;,iattHSSA,
will sing their :ay into Ann Ar-
bor tonight.
"The Society for the Preserva-
tion and Encouragement of Bar-
bershop Quar tet Singing in Amer-
ica, Inc.," is thie name, and ten
of their best Michigan foursomes
will sing at 8 p.m. in the Masonic
Temple.
Tickets are on sale at the Lib-
erty Music Shop and the offices
of all fraternal organiza tions.
Add Tonsorial 'Tones
Locally. "The Sunshine Four"
and "The Miscues" will add their
tonsorial tones to 'The Accousti-
cal Persecuting Four" and "The
Tonsil Benders" both from Jack-
son, plus Dearborn's "Family
Fcur" of three brothers and a
brother-in-law. Among the enter-
tainers are Michigan's Champion
ship top three: "The Antlers,"
"The Cliff Dwellers" and "The
Songmasters."
Historically, barber shop quar-
tets were just the harmonizing
N
Continuous from 1 P.M.
Now Playing

._.,_.

"SOLD OUT STANDING ROOM ONLY"

I

Be Prepared ... Get Your Reservation Now
DANCE Friday, Saturday, Sunday Nite
to the music of Tom McNaII's Orchestra

liabitues of the ancient Gay Nine- berg Trials," a short subject. will POINTS:
ties tonsorial parlors. Their grad- be presented by Art Cinema
ual fade-out is allegea to be the League at 8:30 p.m. Friday, Sat- A60AsEN CLEA-
result of new model swivel bar- urday and Sunday in Kellogg Au- ARTWAY-1946 Packard
ber chairs and the electric shaver. ditorium. J & G BARBER SHOP
Too many tenors were getting The story, with Jean-Louis Bar- E.A.A. SHOPPING
their hair cut and leaving. rault of "Children of Paradise" CENTER
Before Revival fame in the title role. tells of a LAUNDROMAT-
Die-hards finally had to admit: moralist who believes himself ded- E. Williams
barbers were getting too efficient icated to the cause of erasing im- House Pick-Up:
-and the boys didn't even have mortality in all form. Six Shirts or more
time for a chorus of 'She is More Tickets will be on sale from 10 Just call '7775
to Be Pitied Than Censured." be- a.m. to 4 p.m. today in Univer- Plant -2025 Packard
fore the proprietor called, "Next." sity Hall.
- - -- -

DONT TAKE
!! CHANCES!!I
Sam has just the thing
to safeguard your
r possessions.
It has an inside tray
plus lock and key.
What is it?

I

RADIO
TROUBLE?
Dependable 24-Hour Service
at
Reasonable Rates
WARD'S RECORD SHOP
1209 S. Univ. Phone 6330

I

ii
O wit WILLARD PARKER
AKIM TAMIROFF
- I ~

Also- Dance to the Music of Our Own Disk Jockey

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an

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FOR

ARMY-STYLE
FOOT LOCKER

$199

ALLEN EL'S

EASTER
MENU:

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122 E. Washington St.

---Also
Tennis Town
Midnight Snack
World News
Coming Sunday
LARRY PARKS
"THE SWORDSMAN"

FIFRIDAY! I

- ---~-----I------------

A Shape of Things To Come

Announcing
the publication of
PRELIMINARY
DRAFT
of a
WORLD
CONSTITUTION
as proposed for discussion
and signed by:
ROBERT M. HUTCHINS
G. A. BORGESE
MORTIMER J. ADLER
STRINGFELLOW BARR
ALBERT GUERARD
HAROLD A. INNIS
ERICH KAHLER
WILBER G. KATZ
CHARLES H. MCILWAIN
ROBERT REDFIELD
REXFORD GUY TUGWELL
With Supplementary Material
in the March issue of
COMMON CAUSE
A Monthly Repo-,t
of the Committee To Frame
A World Constitution

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