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March 18, 1948 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-03-18

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY. RAH 19- UNA

_________________t+__________________L:119___!_R A l i 'f ! 11
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I

Truman Asks for UMT
To Preserve World Peace

(Continued from Page 1)
Doctrine" came in two install-
ments. He addressed a hushed
joint session of Congress at 11:30
p.m., CST, and then flew to New
York to speak at a St. Patrick's
Day dinner.
He recommended to Congress
three "most urgent steps toward
securing the peace and prevent-
ing war":
Campus
Calendar
Inter-Guild Chapel-Short med-
itation service, 7:30 a.m. League
chapel.
Westminster Guild - Coffee
Hour, 3:30 p.m., Russell Parlor.
Young Democrats-election of
officers-7:30 p.m., Union.
Hiawatha Club-7:30 p.m., Hus-
sey Room, League.
Motion Pictures - Paraguay,
Venezuela and Uruguay, 8 p.m.,
small auditorium, Ann Arbor High
School.
Zoology Department Speech -
W. A. Haag, 7:30 p.m., Rackham
Amphitheatre.
Mock UN Cbmmittee-4:15 p.m.,
Rm. 319, Union.
American Association of Univer-
sity Professors-meeting, 6 p.m.,
Masonic Temple Cafeteria.
Michigras central Committee-
4:30 p.m., Union.
Michigan Theatre-"Love from
a Stranger," 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 p.m.
State Theatre-"Red Stallion,"
1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 p.m.
ASHNVE-'7:30 p.m., Rm. 229,
West Engineering.
IRA Meeting, speech by Jerry
Mc~roskey, plans for Ingram
rally, 7:15, Union.
University 111
Years Old Today
The University of Michigan is
111 years old today.
And across the country there
will be birthday parties.
Although the University was of-
ficially founded in Detroit in 1817,1
it was not until the legislature
formed the Board of Regents on
March 18, 1837, that the institu-
tion actually got under way.
Another act two days later des-
ignated the thriving village of Ann
Arbor (population, 2,000) as the;
school's new home.
today has been marked as Uni-
versity of Michigan Day by The
Alumni Association, and clubs
across the nation have been hold-
ing meetings throughout the week
to commemorate the occasion.

1. Quick adoption of the $5,300,-
000,000 European Recovery Pro-
gram. Congress stepped up action
in that right away.
2. Universal Military Training
-for all young men. Congress was
divided on that, although there
was some strong support for it in
the Senate especially.
Selective Service
3. Selective Service-to give the
armed forces the men they need.
presumably non-veterans up to
the age of 26 or so, until UMT
gets rolling.
Many members of Congress had
their doubts. They asked for fur-
ther proof that it is necessary.
In his New York speech, pre-
pared for the Friendly Sons of
St. Patrick, Mr. Truman declared
that the issue confronting the
world today "is as old as recorded
history."
"It is tyranny versus freedom,"
he said.
And by tyranny, the President
said, he meant Communism-
which he assailed as a denial of
God and of man's right to govern
himself.
Secretary of State Marshall
backed the President's. words by
telling the Senate Armed Serv-
ices Committee later in the day:
Military Strength
Draft... )
(Continued froip Page 1)

SailmIn Pacific
This Summer
Students To Enibark
Oil First Tri inl Juiie
The gangplanks will go up June
26 as 105 Naval ROTC students
embark on the first phase of three
summer training cruises, accord-
ing to Captain H. B. Wheeler,
USN, Professor of Naval Science.
These summer cruises are de-
signed to supplement the NROTC
training program's class work.
Submarine, gunnery and amphib-
ious training will be stressed, in
addition to standing watch and
other shipboard duties in which
the students will engage. Junior
NROTC students will also receive
aviation indoctrination while
aboard aircraft carriers.
Senior-Sophomore
The Senior-Sophomore Cruise of
eight weeks on the battleship USS
Iowa and cruisers USS Spring-
field, USS Pasadena and USS As-
toria will include 52 students.
The first phase of this cruise
will depart from San Francisco,
and stop at Seattle and Long
Beach. Later, the cruise will in-
clude submarine training at Pearl
Harbor and gunnery and amphib-
ious training following a stop in
San Diego.
The Junior Cruise, composed of
43 juniors on another eight-week
cruise, will include the aircraft
carriers USS Valley Forge and
USS Boxer. Pearl Harbor, San
Diego and San Francisco will be
visited and a program similar to
the first cruise will be carried out
aboard ship.
Contact Cruise
Contract Cruise
weeks will be embarked upon by
10 senior contract students, who
will be on board the cruiser USS
Duluth. They will arrive in Vic-
toria, B.C. June 30 and also visit
Long Beach, California. Gunnery
training will be given on this
cruise.
Dorm-Mew
To See Light

(ASIT THArT jyST sUNTAN:
Bureau Can Supply H
-7

4

!I
i

By .10 MTISN[alb
Spring, and the young man's
fancy lightly turns to thoughts
of - summer employment, of
course.
Young men and young women
both, in tracking down summer
jobs, will do well to take the trail
to 201 Mason Mall. There, in the
offices of the University Bureau
of Appointments, Mr. Roy E. Som-
merfeld is in charge of the sum-
mer employment division.
Last year the Bureau registered
1,100 students for summer jobs.
The number who actually accepted
jobs is difficult to estimate, ac-
cording to Mr. Sonmmerfeld, since
the Bureaa acts mainly as a "go-
between" for students and em-
ployers.
Summer Camps
The Bureau cent mts organiza-
tions which employ sumnmer wor%-
ers and tries to locate vacancies
for University students nployers
usually send job applications to
the Bureau or request interested
students to write individual let-
ters of application. After the Bur-
eau makes the initial contacts, it
is up to the student to follow
through in clinching the job.

ot-Weather Jobs

t

About half the calls the Bureau
receives a r from summer camps
inquiring for students and older
persons to fill a variety of i acan-
cies from camp directors and as-
sistants to water-front instructors,
nature study leaders, cooks and
nurses.
Summer resorts employ the next
largest number of students as
waitresses, busboys, bellhops, kit-
chen help, lifeguards, handymen.
desk clerks, nd occasionally as
hostesses or social directors. Most
of these resorts are in the East
or in the Middle West.
Variety of Calls
A variety of calls have come in
for this summer which will chal-
lenge the ingenuity of University
students.
A wealthy "philanthropist" is
looking for a student to act as
companion and recreation super-
visor for teen-agers in the neigh-
borhood. Recreational facilities in-
clude a private swimming pool, a
sailboat and a conveniently locat-
ed country club which offers ten-
nis and golf. The object of his
"philanthrophy" is to prevent the
young innocents from throwing

4

stones through his greenhouse as
they did last summer.
Married students who are hav-
ing housing difficulties may be
interested in living on a farm lo-
cated about 30 minutes from cam-
pus. The owners are looking for a
general handyman and a woman
with a flair for interior decorat-
ing.
Dude ranches will give some
students an opportunity to display
their talents as entertainers in
the romantic West.
Beer Too
Other calls include one from
a brewery in Cleveland for stu-
dents to work in the bottling di-
vision; one for students to work
on blister-rust control in the Na-
tional Forests; and a few for co-
eds on the college boards of de-
partment stores.
Mr. Sommerfeld advised stu-
dents to start now to make ar-
rangements for summer jobs. Stu-
dents who apply early will have
a greater variety of jobs to choose
from, and a better opportunity to
find jobs in an ideal location.

4
4

FIRST FLIGHT FROM CARRIER-Navy jet propelled fighter
plane takes off from an aircraft carrier. Before now, jet planes
have been unable to fly from the flight decks of the navy carriers.

SCHOOL SYSTEM ATTACKED:
Speech Assembly Debates
Education Policies in Colleges

r

_.,.e.

permit the drafting of 800,000 to
1,000,000 men it would have to
pass legislation raising the au-
thorized strength of the armed
forces.
The nation now has 1,392,000
persons in uniform. This is 340,000
short of the full authorized
strength of 1,732,000. (In May,
1945, the total was 11,119,000.)
Some of the questions asked to-
day were: What is the difference
between a draft and universal
military training? How long would
it take to get the two working?
Who would be affected?
As to the difference:
Under the draft, youths could
be taken directly into the armed
services.
Under military training, youths
18 to 20 would be drafted for
maybe a six-month training pe-
riod in camps or on ships, but
legally they would not be in the
armed forces or have to fight ex-
cept in an emergency.
There is a bill now in Con-
gress to set up a universal mili-
tary training program. But once
passed, it might take a year toI
get the program going in full
swing. Approximately 900,000 aI
year would be trained,
These youths could not be used
for fighting either inside or out-
side of the United States except
in case of a national emergency
and then only by a special act of
Congress. But they would be
trained men.

The tarpaulin will be removed
from Williams House, West Quad-
rangle, and residents will see the
lightibefore the end of the spring
vacation.
Commenting on a Letter to the
Editor of the Daily, Francis C.
Shiel, business manager in charge
of residence halls, said re-roofing
of Williams House is expected to
be completed before the dormi-
tory residents retur' frnm the va-
cation.
Re-roofing v,'.s undertaken laot
semester when the ceiling of one
of the dining rooms was threaten-
ed by the leaking roof. A large
tarpaulin ecvering, erected to pro-
tect the workers, has darkened
northern rooms of Williams
House.
The main roofing of the dormi-
toryis of slate. Since slate is not
practical for flat roofs, quartile
deck roofing was used over the
dining room. This material prov-
ed unsatisfactory and did not
stand up under the constant
freezing, and thawing.
The new roofing consists of
layers of tarpaper covered with
gravel.

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By JO SMITH
Crowded classrooms, assembly
line graduations, and inefficient
teaching were put under fire yes-
terday afternoon in a Speech As-
sembly debate
Arguing the question "Resolved:
That the Existing Educational
Policies in American Colleges and
Universities are Unsatisfactory,"
Deborah Rabinowitz asked, "Is it
the purpose of the University to
turn out an assembly line of grad-
uates not caring what happens to
them while they are in college?"
Overcrowded Conditions
She was answered by Donald
Mitchell who pointed out the con-
struction going on now and being
planned for the future which will
alleviate the overcrowded condi-
tions of classrooms. He also men-
tioned that a large percentage
of college students are veterans
and deserve an education in spite
of the overcrowding.
Duane Sunderman stressed the
fact that the University system
lacks cohesiveness, because
courses contradict each other, of-
ten do not fit into fields of con-
centration, or are not usable. He
suggested integrated courses of
study to be carried through all
four years of college.
Answering this Dorothy Gute-
kunst said, "No course can be
completely isolated. There is a
natural cohesiveness in any col-
lege course." She used the "Theory
Coiieii t r a ioli
Talks Con tilie
Concentration discussions will
continue today with talks for those
interested in Area Language Sel-
ies, Astronomy, Physics, and the
Degree Program in Science and
Mathematics.
The Area Language discussions
will be held at 4:15 p.m. fcdaly.
Rm. 231 Angell Hall.
Prof. J. Yamagiwa will speak on
"Concentration in Oriental Lan-
guages and Literature"; Prof. A.
Lobanov-Rostovsky on "Aims and
Purposes of the Russian Studies";
Prof. Lila Pargment on "Some
Reasons for Studying the Russian
Language"; andProf. D. D. Brand
on "Latin-American Studies as a
Field of Concentration."
The talks on Astronomy, Phy-
ics, and the Degree Program in
Science and Mathematics will be
held at 4:15 p.m., today, Rm. 25
Angell Hall.
Prof. F. D. Miller will speak on
"Astronomy as a Field of Concen-
tration"; Prof. H. R. Crane on
"Physics as a Field of Concentra-
tion"; and Prof. D. L. Rich on
"Science and Mathematics as a
Field of Concentration."
Future speech concentrates will
meet at 4:15 p.m., tomorrow, Rm.
25 Angell Hall. Mathematics con-
centration talks will be held at
4:15 p.m., tomorrow, Rm. 231 An-
gell Hall.
Flaclty Smo~ker
Residents of the West Quadra -
gle will act as hosts at a Faculty
Smoker to be -held from 7:30 to
9:30 p.m., Sunday at the dormi-
tory.
You Should Know that
the
Wolverine

Miss Your Dinner (if you have to)

Miss Your Date (if you must)
TH E ESTOHII E H
T HE N EW EST, MOST T HR IL L ING T A LE NTH U NT I N A ME RICA

(.

many phases of education.
Able Teachers?
In rebuttal of Miss Rabino-
witz's question "Do we have an
exceptionally able staff of teach-
ers or is the able teacher the
exception?" Mrs. Gutekunst said
that we can not have a monopoly
on all the good professors and
that in comparison we have a very
high degree of able teachers. "Uni-
versity professors are hired on the
basis of scholarship and teaching
ability," Mrs. Gutekunst stated.
Sunderman stated his belief
that the University does not pre-
pare us for life. "Too many
courses are included in the cur-
riculum which have no place in
this preparation," he maintained
APPLICATION
PHOTOS
24-Hour Service
IVORY PHOTO
1030 E. University
Tel. 8413

of Knowledge" course as an ex-
ample of an integrated study of

- If you don't like TIlS Music
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N EW! "Pops" and a Be-Bop
That Ain't Right . ..... .. . ................... Frankie Laine
Laroo Laroo Lilli Bolero ......... .... . Frankie Carle
I Want a Big Butter and Egg Man ...... Mary Ann McCall
M atinee ................................ Gordon Mae Rae
i ~Haunted Heart .................. Buddy Clark
Little WhiteaLies .... Dinah Shore
Red Wing ....... . . .... Sam Donahue
Shauny O'Shea .... ... .. . Jack Smith
For Every Man There's a Woman . . .. . Tony Martin
Round 'Bout Midnight .......... Thelonious Monk Quintet
ALIBUMS '
Eddy Howard Al Jolson
Art Tatum (on Decca) New Sounds in Modern
Edith Piaff Music
King Cole, Vol. III Frankie Laine Sings
Saturday Night Swing Errol Garner Piano Solos
Session, Vol. II Keys to Romance with
George Brunis Buddy Cole
Piad'iogfkecolS/top
Phone 3542 . . . . . NORTH END 0 DIAGONAL . . . .. 715 North University

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11th 'U' Birthday
Radio will pay its tribute to the
111th birthday of the University at
8 p.m. today in a student produced
program over WHRV.
Highlighting the program will
be songs by the Glee Club and
band, short talks by President
Alexander G. Ruthven and T.
Hawley Tapping, and Louis Elbel's
piano rendition of the Victor's
March, which he composed.

INCLUDING TOP
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