100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 16, 1948 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-03-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

__________TIM, MI( IIIG, AI AILYthu
...- . . .........

I 9*6

GRACIAS, SENOR:
Latin Americans Offer
Educational Opportunities

-
To Consider
Appropriation
(Continued from Page 1)

I#
Psychlology Service Receives
Machine to Help Blind to Read

I1

<.

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the third
in a series of articles on going to
school abroad)

By DOLORES PALANKER
Many students would rather see
this side of the world first, and
for this reason many universities
in North and South America have
planned courses to fit their re-
quirements.
Practically all schools in Latin
America offering courses for for-
eigners require two years of col-
lege Spanish. The University of
Chile, Santiago de Chile, Casilla
L egislature .. .
(Continued from Page 1)
faculty rating system and spon-
sored the events connected with
Homecoming.

Members feel, however, that
with active campus support, the
Legislature could better fulfill its
functions, and with this in mind,
plans are underway to make it
possible for all students to work
with the Legislature on the vari-
ous projects.
Descriptions of the individual
committees and their projects will
appear in subsequent issues of
The Daily, and students interest.
ed may contact the individual
committee chairmen.
Czechs ...
(Continued from Page 1)
ister Neville Chamberlain felt this
"shock to confidence all the more
regrettable since confidence was
beginning to revive."
Chamberlain explained that in
taking over Bohemia and Moravia,
Hitler was occupying non-German
areas for the first time.
Lord Halifax felt the same
"shock to confidence," while a
spokesman for the British Labor
Party charged appeasement with
the responsibility for British "hu-
miliation and shame."
Premier Edouard Daladier lost
little time in asking for sweeping
executive powers to enable France
to act as rapidly as the dictator-
ruled nations.
It was a time for decision.
TYPEWRITERS
Office and Portable Models
of'all makes
Sold,
Bouch ,
Rented,
Repaired
STATIONERY & SUPPLIES
0*,1 IDOIRILL
314 South State St.
G. I. Requisitions Accepted
:.PHtO h E for
your FOOD...
e delivert
your door...-
HOT HAMBURGERS
FRENCH PRIES
MALTED MILKS
HOME-MADE CHILI
MILK-COFFEE-COKES
Special
HOT FISH& CHIPS 70c
CA LL
4585
Carry-Burger Service

i
^_f
s l,,
ti
1
2
e

3
3
1
1
1
F
r
s

10-D) will present courses in edu-
cation, literature, philosophy, arts,
folklore and Chilean culture.
To Be Offered
Latin American language and
culture, art and archaeology will
be offered at the National Uni-
versity of Colombia, Borgota, Co-
lombia and at the University of
San Carlos, Guatemala, Central
America, courses in intensive lan-
guage training, Spanish history
and literature, Guatemalan and
Mayan specialties are listed. (In-
formation about the latter may be
obtained from Thoms Irving, San
Carlos Summer School, Guate-
mala, C. A., or Virginia H. Irving,
2299 Sacramento St., San Fran-
cisco, Cal.)
Summer schools in Mexico will
be at: National University of Mex-
ico, San Cosme 71, Mexico D. F.,
language, literature, arts and
crafts; Mexico City College, San
Luis Potosi 154, Mexico D. F.,
Spanish language and literature,
liberal arts; State University of
Michoacan, Morelia Michoacan,
Mexico, Spanish and Latin Ameri-
can history and civilization; and
University of Guadalajara, School
of Fine Arts, Guadalapara Mexi-
co.
Application Blanks
Application blanks may be ob-
tained from Stirling Dickinson,
Associate Director, 1500 Lake
Shore Drive, Chicago, Illinois, for
Escuela Universitaria de Bellas
Artes, Guanajuato, Mexico which
will conduct courses in painting,
sculpture, carving, weaving and
Mexican culture.
Mr. Donald M. Custer, Box 413,
Salida, ColoradIo, has application
blanks to Escuela Interamedicana
de Verano, Satillo, Mexico, which
lists courses in Spanish language
and literature, shorthand and
folklore.
University of San Marcos, Lima,
Peru, offers to 100 students above
junior grade courses in Peruvian
culture, government, science and
business, and Spanish language.
Field trips and excursion to Inca
and Pre-Inca ruins, museums and
libraries will be included in all
courses.
In North
In the North, the following
Canadian universities have opened
their doors to American students:
Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, arts,
sciences, education; British Co-
lumbia. Vancouver, B.C., an-
P.Q., languages, philosophy; Mc-
Gill, Montreal, Quebec, geography,
and French language, literature
and civilization requiring a knowl-
edge of French; McMaster, Dept.
of Extension, Hamilton, Ontario,
literature, history of art, mental
hygiene, psychology, dramatics.
The list of universities contin-
ues with: Manitoba, Winnipeg,
Manitoba, liberal arts; sciences,
home economics, agriculture;
Montreal, Montreal, P.Q., French
language and literature; New
Brunswick, Frederiton, N.B., lib-
eral arts; Queen's Kingston, On-
tario, liberal arts, music, drama,
art, radio; Toronto, Ontario, psy-
chology, philosophy, English,
French, economics, sociology, his-
tory, mathematics, geography,
clemistry, Latin, German, educa-
tion.
Students Debate
A student discussion of Uni-
versity methods of instruction will
be held at 3 p.m. tomorrow in the
Rackhamn Lecture Hall as the sec-
ond speech assembly of the semes-
ter.
"Resolved: That the existing
educational policies in American
colleges and universities are 11,1
satisfactory," will be debated in
the cross-examination style.

Upholding the University will
be Dorothy Gutekunst, Grad., and
Donald Mitchell, '48. Deborah Ra-
binowitz, '49, and Duane 'Sunder-
man, '49, will criticize present ed-
ucational methods.
The debate is open to the pub-
lic.

In the $7,057,000 request for ad-
ditional building, the University
is asking funds to construct an ad-
dition to Angell Hall, an addition
to the general library, a motor
service shopand a fire station.
Building Age
Niehuss pointed out that the
age of the lit school buildings
ranges from 24 (Angell Hall) to
107 (Mason Hall). "An addition
to Angell Hall would replace three
buildings which were declared un-
fit for use 25 years ago," he de-
clared.
Citing a need for library expan-
sion, Niehuss said the last remod-
eling was done in 1915. "At pres-
ent the library has three times as
many students using it as then,
and houses four times as many
volumes of books."
Motor Service Shop
Niehuss declared a motor service
shop is badly needed to service the
150 motor units the University
now operates and which must at
present be repaired outdoors.
The fire station would be built
in cooperation with the city at a
spot near campus. "We're very
lucky we have had no serious fires
in these condemned buildings but
we need more than luck, we need
concrete fire protection," Niehuss
said.

-1

It's New!

It's Novel!

SENATORS TALK AFTER FOREIGN AID BILL PASSAGE-Members of the Senate Foreign Rela-
tions Committee talk after midnight in the office of the president of the Senate after members
passed the European aid program. Left to right: Tom Connally (Dem., Tex.); Arthur Vanden-
berg (Rep., Mich.), chairman, and Senate president pro tem, Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. (Rep.,
Mass.), and Alexander Wiley (Rep., Wis.). Vandenberg and Connally introduced the bill.

Convocation to Honor Students
The 13th annual Convocation of Lecture Hall of the Rackham
the University of Michigan's Building.
School of Education will be held I 350 prospective teachers will be
at 2:10 p.m. next Friday in the ( honored.
DAILYOFIILBLEN

Automatic enlargement and cm-
bossing of printed or wvrit ten ma-
terial so that the blind may read
by touch is the work of a new
machine recently assigned to the
Bureau of Psychological Services.
The machine is the Faximile
Visagraph, developed by Radio In-
ventions, Inc., of New York, under
the sponsorship of the National
Research Council's Committee on
Sensory Devices. It is one of a
number of mechanical aids for
the blind produced under this
committee's direction and the sec-
ond to be assigned to the Univer-

sity for psychologicl evaluation,
i first was the electronic pen-
cil.
Two cylind rs and a photoelec-
tric cell are iajor components of
the Visagraph. On one cylinder is
placed the printed page or map
or diagram which is to be repro-
duced.
A beaim of light scans the page
as the cylinder revolves, and by
means of a photoelectric cell ac-
tivates an embossing device which
operates as the second cylinder
turns. This second cylinder is cov-
ered with a sheet of aluminum foil.

Detroit Personnel Mar
To Meet Job Seekers
Dr. George H. Baker, personnel
director of the Detroit Board of
Education will meet informally at
4 p.m. Thursday with teacher can-
didates for assignments in the De-
troit school system.
The place of the meeting will
be announced shortly.

The Wde DEN
A really bright, spot for DIN ING & I)ANCING
to the lest music the campus offers.
Open Soon - Watch for the Opening Date!

W H0?

WHEN?

WHERE?

Read the Daily tomorrow!

(Continued from Page 4)
and "General Election;" auspices
of the Audio-Visual Education
Center.
The Journalism Society will pre-
sent two movies "Spotlight on the
Balkans," and "People of the
USSR. 7:30 p.m., Newsroom, Hav-
en Hall. All concentrates invited.
Coffee hour.
Student Branch, Society of Au-
tomotive Engineers: Rm. 304,
Michigan Union. Speaker: Mr.
Harold Welch, Assistant Supervi-
sor of Chrysler Engine Develop-
ment Laboratory. Open meeting.
Sigma Rho Tau, Engineering
Stump Speakers' Society: Michi-
gan Union, 7:15 p.m. Circle train-
ing and general meeting.
The Deutscher Verein: 8 p.m.,
Rm. 318-320, Michigan Union.
Ushers for Hillelzapoppin: Meet-
ing for those interested in ushering
for HILLELZAPOPPIN (Mar. 20)
4:15 p.m., today at Hillel Founda-
tion. Men are needed for ticket-
takers, girls for ushering. If un-
able to attend meeting, call De-
borah Wolson, 4685.
Christian Science Organization:
7:30 p.m., Upper Room, Lane Hall.
Polonia Club: 7:30 p.m., Inter-
national Center. Discussion of se-
mester plans, refreshments and
entertaiment.
Americans for Democratic Ac-
tion: General membership meet-
ing, 7:30 p.m., Rm. 321, Michigan
Union. Bob Greene, Region Politi-
cal Director, will report on "ADA
Viewpoints on Current Issues."
Discussion. New members and in-
terested people invited.
IZFA: 8 p.m., Dramatic skit "On
Top of the World." Song and
dance group 7:30. All welcome.
Michigan Dames Handicraft
Group meetsat 8 p.m. at the home
or Mrs. Btreram Fulton, 845
Brookwood, East Ann Arbor.
Coming Events
Research Club: 8 p.m., March 17,
Rackham Amphitheatre. Papers:
Prof. Hans Kurath, "Speech Areas.
Settlement Areas, and Trade Areas
in the Eastern States," Prof. Wil-
liam H. Burt, "Effects of Volcanic
Activity on Animal Life."
Michigan Chapter AAUP:
Thurs., March 18, 6 p.m., Masonic
Temple Cafeteria. Note change of
place. Mr. Samuel Jacobs of the
Education- Dept., U.A.W.-C.LO.
will speak on "Labor looks at adult
education."
Delta Sigma Pi, Professional

Business Fraternity. Pledge and
business meeting, 7:30 p.m., Wed.,
March 17, Michigan Union.,

Phi Lambda
luncheon, Wed.,
p.m., Anderson
Union.

Upsilon: March
March 17, 12:15
Room, Michigan

Faculty Women's Club: Tea, 3
to 5 p.m., Wed., March 17, at the
home of Mrs. A. G. Ruthven.
American Society of Mechanical
Engineers: Open meeting, Wed.,
March 17, 7:30 p.m., in Rm. 321,
Michigan Union. Mr. M. R. Fox of
Vickers Inc., will speak on "Appli-
cations of Hydraulics and Hy-
draulic Machinery in Industry."
National Lawyers Guild, Student
Chapter: Wed., March 17, Michi-
gan Union. Business meeting,
election of officers for the coming
term, and discussion of plans for
facture lectures. All members urged
to attend.
U. of M. Radio Club: Thurs.,
March 18. 7:30 p.m., Rm. 1084, E.
Engineering Bldg. Nomination of
officers, and conducted tour of the
Radio Labs.
G agovl Sle Irr mutimm S tarrf
tryout meeting: Students with
ideas, ambition, and talent for
promotional work are invited to
attend the tryout meeting, Wed.,
March 17, 4 p.m., Student Publi-
cations Bldg., or contact Gene
Hicks, Sales Promotion Manager,
East Quadrangle.
Rabbi herschel Lymon will hold
his weekly class on "The Outlines
cf Jewish History," 4 p.m., Wed.,
Hillel Foundation. All students in-
vited.
current0
rate
O N S AVN G S
.insured to $5000,
Any amount opens
your account at
ANN ARBOR
Savings and Loan Assn
116 N, Fourth Avenue
Springtime
Ski- limel
4 4
OLORADO
i ra e (n S ( '1' t ch 21, Nla y 1
ihrmma oom eA ki sho 4
11,tll- lY N_ I ii US al = ll )1

1'

CHAMPION N. Y. YANKEE'S
JOE DiMAGGIO
VOTED MOST VALUABLE PLAYER
IN THE AMERICAN LEAGUE

4

GAP1ElT

I

"YERS TOilAC c Co ,

t?, s ,mot;" ,,
. }{~
. r } 1
,,zr .
' Mk .r <
,
. ¢' ,.v
*.
. ti, r . > s,.
4s it
mot'. .' (;
T 1
4

Wen yo&mchf n e to £ 14er eW.
THE FIRST THING YOU WIL
NOTICE IS THEIR ILDNESS
ad h ecatme aftlwirll rlm 6 inr&,
LWAYS MILDER
t . f. .. :. ETTER TASTINIG
..*OOLER SMOKING

Il b l1

BIDS will now be accepted for a
PHOTOGRAPHER'S booth spon-
sored by The Michigan Daily at
MICHIGRAS.
If you wish to submit a bid
contact' Bill Ta tterso l 123-23-6 or

:. A:::
_:",

BOSTON BRAVE'S
BOB ELLIOTT
VOTED MOST VALUABLE PLAYER
IN THE NATIONAL LEAGUE

No experience or capitil required. \e
train you and furish everything c

11!11 H 1 11 14 11

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan