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March 12, 1948 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-03-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE-MICTILGAN ~DATLYFRY

I I

Foreign Schools Make Plans
For U.S. Summer Students

Avenue, New York 17; Florence.
Italian language and culture; Per-
ugia, Italian University for For-
eigners, Italian language and cul-
ture; Siena, Italian language and
culture, and music at the Acca-
demia Musicale Chigiana; and
Vergilian Society's ClWsical Sum-
mer School of Cumae at Naples-
apply to Mrs. Raiola, 15 Gramercy
Park, New York 3.
Norwegian Culture
Information may be obtained
from Dean Norman Nordstrand,
St. Olaf College, Northfield, Minn.,
about courses in Norwegian cul-
ture at the University of Oslo.
Professor Torgny T. Segerstedt, V.
Agatan 22, Uppsala, Sweden, carn
advise students concerning the
Folk Universitetet Uppsalastud-
enternas Kursverksamhet at Up-
psala which will offer a course
in Aspects of Sweden Today.
The Universities of Santander
and Santiago, Spain, will also
conduct courses for foreigners.
Swiss Schools
Among the Swiss schools offer-
ing courses in French language
and culture are Geneva, Lausan-
ne and Neuchatal.
The American University, Beir-
ut, Lebanon, plans courses in Mid-
dle Eastern culture. Those inter
ested may apply to Lewis Curtis
State Teachers College, Oneonta.
New York.

SURVEY RETURNS-Gov. Thomas E. Dewey (seated) happily
returns from a New Hampshire primary, in Albany, N.Y., which
gave him six of the state's eight seats to the GOP National
Convention. With him is James C. Haggerty, his executive assist-
ant. Dewey said he was "deeply" gratified at "such generous sup-
port" for the presidential nomination.
CACKLING BLONDES:
Post Office Read for Chicks

Recreation in
Small Towns
Receives Boost
Communities Adopt
Organiized Progranls
An increasing number of small
Michigan communities have be-
come interested in planned recre-
ation, Will G. Robinson, a Michi-
gan recreation worker has dis-
covered.
According to his findings, about
125 towns have now formed such
programs.
Adequate Programs
As assistant in community or-
ganization with the University of
Michigan, Robinson has conduct-
ed extensive recreational surveys.
Through them he has concluded
that all small communities of
Michigan are capable of having
adequate recreation programs.
To establish them, it is necessary
for the community to make use
of all the human resources and
physical facilities at hand.
Avoid Imitating
Robinson warns that small com-
munities must avoid imitating cit-
ies for the problems arising out of
the two differ. In urban com-
munities the major problem is one
of obtaining adequate space, wher-
as in rural sections it is the type
and amount of recreational ac-
tivities that matters.
"In almost all small communi-
ties, recreation programs can best
be operated by the schools," the
University man states. He also
believes that volunteer workers
must be used if the program is to
be carried out successfully plus
year around direction. However
the best results can be obtained
through coordination and cooper-
ation of all community efforts.
Keniston in Mexico
Dean Hayward Keniston, of the
literary college, has gone to Mex-
ico City, where he will help with
plans for a proposed new univer-
sity city for the National Univer-
sity, according to The Associated
Press.
Dean Keniston, who has re-
ceived a grant from the U.S. State
Department for expenses, will re-
main in Mexico for about a month.
Bennett in East
Dean Wells I. Bennett, of the
College of Architecture and De-
sign, will attend a meeting of the
Executive Committee of the Com-
mittee on Education for the
American Institute of Architects
in New York City today.

I

Heading a probe of the Michi-
gan prisons is University professor
Arthur E. Wood, of the sociology
department, who will confer with
other members of his advisory
committee Monday. March 15 at
the Jackson prison.
This newly formed prison Ad-

in Lo.f :i sig' v's clean-up of
the State Correj ions Department.
a group will invem-igate anda
me. rocomnlendat ons to Gov-
t'rnog Sialr U> to how he can
. .'e ulic cofidence' in the
state prisn svm4cm.

Prof. Wood Heads NeV Probe
In Sigler's Prison Clean Ufp

visory Council is the itatsstP P i a in in the rcorganiza-
tin is ncw Correjions Commis-
* ' toner ,Jovoli W. Sanford, who
M ichigan r ill act wi Governor Sigler on
lu' recommen(Iat ions of the ad-
Cf heFrm e d 'lV co ncil, v' ,idh includes:
Cl b o m ePro. ood: Pw. Alfred C. Wil-
Il_ _ o Dtoi:KaD07zor, of
The crib isn't for babies any. land. Pail V. Rickets, of Bat-
more-its the Michigan Crib, for tE t k an Fater Cabriel, of
"arristers still in the cradle stage. In a 'iatemn to The Daily
Recently organized, the 'Crib' la ii . Prof. Wood said that
was founded "to further the in- the cun(Il had coni to no con-
terests, ideals and aspirations of clusions upon lho will be ousted
future law students in their chos- froml the rison system. He add-
en profession." ed that Monday's meeting in Jack-
And it will do that if it follows s n will be primarily for discus-
the historic significance of 12th Sin of the i artmental situation.
Century law. Then the 'crib' was
the section of the courtroom from Continuous from 1 P M.
which law students observed court
proceedings.
The newly-sprouting Michigan
Cribs have formulated and adopt- ;
ed a constitution and applied to
the Student Affairs Committee for Toda and Saturday
recognition. The petition is ex- OA
pected to be acted upon by SAC at ;ERR
their next meeting.
Officials of the newly-formed TREVOR
organization are: William G. Reit- I
zer, president; Nathan E. Spring-
er, vice president; Robert McGhee,
corresponding secretary; and Cor-
nel Francu, treasurer. William R.
Leslie, of the history department,
is faculty advisor of the group.

Radio Course
Givel by Club
A short course in amateur radio
theory. law. and practice will be
offered by the West Quad Radio
Club next week.
The first session of the course,
open to alli men living in Univer-
sity residence halis and interested
in joining the club, will be held
at 7 p.m. Tuesday in the Radio
Room of the Williams House tow-
er.
Taught by Bruce Weinert, Al
Swain, Corky Eberwein, and
James Murray, the class will meet.
each Tuesday and Thursday from
7 to 8 p.m. Students may sign up
for the course at the first meet-
ing.
1 , -

GOOD
FOOD
. .. Well Prepared
TEMPLE

4.

4>

1

"Home of 3-Hour
Odorless Dry Cleaning"
630 South Ashley
Phone 4700

' I

The annual chick invasion of
Ann Arbor's Post Office is ex-
nected any moment, Postmaster
Oswald J. Koch, announced yes-
terday.
Thousands of feathery refugees
From an eggshell are expected to
-.ake their yearly crusade through
he mail to farmers and hopeful
hicken-raisers in the city and
urrounding area.
For three or four weeks, Koch
explains, postal clerks will be sav-
ng a warm spot in the center of
he Post
the Post Office giant sorting room
"or 25 flat crates a day, each con-
aining 100 scrambling ballls of
'yellow fluff. How many will pass
hrough postal portals, Koch said

he couldn't estimate, but he was
certain most of them made the
grade.
"A 10 or 15 per cent loss is
normal; but much depends on the
health of the chicks," he said.
After all the chicks are out of
the way, and the deluge of seed
catalogues is pas, the 'letter' men
still are faced with mail order cat-
alogues, each 8x11 and three
inches deep, according to Koch.
"Butsthe mail order companies
warn us in advance. We get half
a truck-load each morning for
several days," Koch said.
The post office is a 24-hour-a-
day, seven-day-week proposition,"
Koch commented.

I

I

MATINEE TOMORROW 2:30 P.M.
A Double Bill of Opera
DIDO AND AENEAS
by HENRY PURCELL
and
THE TELEPHONE
by GIAN CARLO MENOTTI
TONIGHT and Tomorrow 8 P.M. Saturday Matinee 2:30 P.M.
Tickets $1.50 - $1.20 - 90c (tax incl.)

inassi fied Advertising

'U' Library Now
UN Distributor
The University is now official
distributing agency for educa-
tional materials about the United
Nations, Dr. Warner G. Rice, di-
rector of the University Library,
has announced.
Requests for material concern-
ing the UN should be directed to
the Library Extension Service of
the University, rather than to the
United Nations. This work, being
done at the request of the Edu-
cational Liaison Department of
Public Instruction of the UN, is
part of a national plan for making
information about the UN avail-
able to the public.
Unitarian Students Ask
Lifting to fMY1ARan
The Unitarian Student Group
has joined other campus organi-
zations supporting the petition of
MYDA for re-recognition as a stu-
dent group, Marion Burger, sec-
retary, announced.

-~ ----Also___
La zy Lithe Beaver
.4a<; is News
--- Coming Sunday
CLAUDETTE COLBERT
'SLEEP MY LOVE,

J

t

Caea

Masonic Temple Building
327 South Fourth St.
Between Liberty and
Williams

TODAY and Saturday
Continuous from 1:30 P.M.

Special Rate for Students, Saturday Matinee
Box Office Phone 6300
DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH - SCHOOL OF MUSIC
LYDIA MENDELSSOH N THEATER

72c1

POSITION WANTED
VET, 27, with educational, commercial
writing, and murical background,
B.A. 1942. seeks full time job. Write
Box 69, Michigan Daily. )39
FOR RENT
MALE STUDENT wanted for two-room
suite. Excellent rooms and location.
407 E. Liberty. Phone 2-0720. )40
WANTED TO RENT
IP US OFF on your apartment if you
┬░xpect to leave in June. Quiet couple,
both grad students, need furnished
apt. in June. Possible 3 yr. occu-
,ancy. Thanks. Write Box 67, Michi-
gan Daily. )6
AWYER and wife desire furnished
)r unfurnished house or apartment.
Clean, comfortable and convenient
to law school. Two year lease starting
June 15. Phone 25-9423. )85

a

I

car edScetd ox )

WANTED

AT LOW PR.ICES

313 South State
Open 730 A.M.- 12 Midnight

p

t":

A

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!
:;
4
i

FRATERNITY is looking for annex on
School year basis if possible. Can
place 15-20 men if you have room.
We'll guarantee the rent. Call 2-
2205 any evening. )23
'ANTED--Two, three or four-drawer
ling cabinet. Call Donald Pelz days.
.511 exi 589 e-enings and veek-
!id .2-7603. )82
' NTED: High School student or
,ed Will exchange board and room
'or part-time housework Write Box
35 Michigan Daily 164
/'5 mm. or Bantam frosted glass slid-
In- back adapter. 2%-3% camera
'hone 7252 after 5 p.m. )15
LOST AND FOUND
OST: Wedding present from hus-
band. Long single strand individually
knotted pearls night of Michigan-
Iowa game in Field House or on State
or Arch Street. Please contact 2-1828
Reward. )49
.OST: On Monday, a black Parker 51
pencil. Lost between Angell Hall and
Jordan. Sentimental value. Reward.
Call 2-4561-379. )41
LOST: Rimless gold eyeglasses during
exam weeks last semester. Finder
please call 439 Anderson House. )36
LOST: Quad Student. Pair grey suede
gloves between Ann Arbor and Tele-
graph Road. Reward. Call 2-7569. )24
LOST: Lady's Westfield watch between
Olivia St., and Romance Language
Bldg. Initials on back-M.C.P. Call
2-3839. )48
REWARD for return of knife, chain
and key to Room One, University Hail.
)30

HELP WANTED
GIRL TO HELP with housework. Ap-
proximately four hours daily. In-
quire 1467 University Terrace, Apt.
1323. )35
GIRL for counter and fountain work.
Campus location. Prefer student's
wife. Call 5464. )47
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED: Riders to vicinity of Tuc-
son, Ariz., one way only in '47 Hud-
son. Leave April 2 or 3. Share ex-
penses. Call Whitmore Lake 4332 or
visit 4060 N.S. )27
VETERAN, wife, and baby desire ride
to Rochester, N.Y., on or about' April
3. Will share expenses and driving.
Phone 2-8382. )42
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING: Theses, term papers, ad-
dresses. Duplicating: notices, form
letters, programs. A2 Typing Serv-
ice. 208 Nickels Arcade, Ph. 9811. )28
THINK OF HILDEGARDE'S when you
think of spring Let us give your last
year's wardrobe that new look. Alter-
ttions a specialty with prompt serv-
ice Custom clothes and re-styling.
Jildegarde Shop. 109 East Washing-
ion Telephone 2-4669. 187
FOR SALE
CAT-GUT BADMINTON RACQUET in
good condition; wooden press includ-
ed. Call Walter at 6012. )38
FOR SALE-RCA-Victor table model
radio-phonograph combination. Will
accept typewriter in exchange. Phone
Dobberstein. Room 119, Strauss,
2-4591. )37
SACRIFICE SALE! Radios. Spartan
Console, $30. Emerson Table model,
$15. Philco Portable, $12. 422 E.
Washington, Ken Bissell after 7 p.m.
)43
OOK SHARP, be sharp, feel sharp
in my Hart, Schaffner Lt. grey flan-
nel suit, 39R. $40 Dale Blocher. Ph.
8574 8-9 p.m. )29
FOR SALE: A Royal portable typewrit-
er with French and German accents,
$50. Call 2-0877. )32
SPORT COAT, gray green, 39 long.
Tailored by De Pinna, 5th Ave. Worn
3 times; like new .Originally $80;
now $25. Contact Room M-41, Law-
yer's Club. )44
1938 PLYMOUTH. Clean inside and out.
Call Lee, 124 Greene E.Q. 2-4591. )26
FULL DRESS SUIT, size 39 and acces-
sories. Shirt size 1512. Good con-
dition. Phone 2-8402. )45
MIDNIGHT BLUE TAILS, 42 long. Worn
four times, $35. Call 25-9299. )46
CANARIES, parrakeets, bird supplies
and cages also Apex radio and Silver-
tone radio-phonograph. 562 South
Seventh, corner Madison. Ph. 5330. )8

Coming
Sunday!

Ai

a

14th ANNIVERSARY
SALE CONTINUED
OR IENTAL
RUGS r
e 30% to 35% discount
on all our 9x12, 8x11
-4- Throw and Hearth
Rugs, Runners and
Mats. No Luxury Tax.
N. L. Mangou
S334 S. Fourth Ave. -
Phone 6878
r

"WILD HARVEST"
"NORTHWEST OUTPOST"

I
OWN

i

SU T RATE

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I :~-~ ~.-- - - . .1

}; ^ TH E LOVE PRIZE OF TH E DESERT 1
+ . ... .
YVONNE
DE CA RLO
GEORGE
BRYE N "T
Plus! GENE AUTRY "ROBINHOOD OF TEXAS"

N

(

)l

CALL 7i9 1

BsEER
WINE - CHAMPAGNE - MIXERS
CONVENIENT DRIVE-THRU SERVICE

=., MIU

.; .

Michigan Doily
CLASSIFIEDS
are getting more popu-
lar every week . . . be-
cause they give you re-
sults for the little they
cost.
What Do They
DO
They reach 18,000 read-
ers every day, and are
read by the vast major-
ity. YOUR AD...
READ BY THOUS-
ANDS.
What Do They
COST
The average ad costs

. .
;i_
z,
k
a
a'

Shows at 1-3-5-7-9 P.M.
35c until 5 o'clock
WALTER WANGER presents
ROBERT SUSAN
heCUMMINGS HAYWARD
Z... ... - ..m.. U U maa a - a U m

I

Sims
RESTAURANT
New hours

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III III

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