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March 10, 1948 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1948-03-10

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4

""" saTHE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, MARRCH 10, 1949

GHOSTS TO EVACUATE:
Parking Lot Will Replace Movie
ByFRANIVICRand 4? * *
JAKEHIJRWITZ
The ghosts of Rudolph Valen-
tino and Theda Bara will soon be
evicted from their favorite Ann
Arbor haunt when the old walls .
of the once proud Majestic Thea-
tre settle in the dust of a new city
parking lot.
The Maj of today keeps all
knowledge of its former self
locked in the memories of alumni
and reminiscent townspeople, of
whom only a few will remember

House

that the Maj made its debut as a
roller-skating rink next door to
Granger's Dance Academy, cur-
rently a funeral home.
Roller Skates to Grease Paint
Roller-skates gave way to
grease-paint on Dec. 19, 1907,
when the Majestic Theatre opened
with the musical "Girl of the
Golden West." For several years
following this burgeoning, the
Maj was considered the finest
theatre in the city.
In keeping with its reputation,
the Maj sported the largest elec-
tric sign in Ann Arbor, which peo-
ple came from Ypsi and Chelsea to
gaze upon.
Today, merely a shell of the re-
splendant movie house which
played host to 35 years of the na-
tion's best films, countless vaude-
ville acts and stage plays, the
Maj is slowly crumbling apart.
Fallen plaster litters all sur-
faces in the building where the
Fred Waring Orchestra had its
first theatre engagement. The
carpeting which many students
tread to see Cary Grant perform
as a stilt-walker is now merely
food for healthy growths of fungi.
Hand-Organ Era
Down in the orchestra pit, the
gilt hand-organ is now tarnished
and harshly out-of-tune. The
curtain that has spelled an eve-
ning's entertainment to thousands
hangs limp over the stage, pro-
claiming "Asbestos Fire Curtain"
through its many holes.
Even after movies stole the show
in 1919, stage shows were some-

Daily-Mecready.
PARKING LOT-The old Majestic Theatre, soon to be abandoned
by the ghosts of Tom Mix and Marguerite Clark, steeps in mold
while waiting for the demolition crew to clear its site on Maynard
St. for a future parking lot. Originally a roller-skating rink, the
Maj hit its peak as a popular movie theatre in the 20's.
times booked at the theatre. In one .ad a unique way of showing their

AIM's Drive
For Members
In 2nd Week
Most of Rlesidence
H-lalls Now Affiliated
'The Association o Independ-
ent Men's 10th anniversary meni-
bership drive moved into its sec-
ond week Monday as Norris Do-
mangue,npresident, announced
that a concerted effort. is being
made to bring representatives of
co-op and rooming houses into the
organization.
Among the University residence
halls, 13 of the 19 houses have al-
ready affiliated with the recent-
ly reorganized independent group
which had its beginning on cam-
pus in March, 1938.
Congress Formed
At that time an organization
known as the congress was formed
in the interests of independent
men. The campus was divided into
wards, each ward sending one rep-
resentative to the congress.
This body flourished until May,
1942 when the drain on manpower
forced it into inactivity. During
its existence it established a num-
ber of activities for independent
men, most of which were taken
over by various campus organi-
zations in 1942.
AIM was organized last semes-
ter to perpetuate some of the de-
funct congress. It received offi-
cial University recognition in Jan-
uary and is now affiliated with
the National Independent Stu-
dents Association.
Coordinate Independents
Specifically, AIM will attempt to
"coordinate all . . activities among
independent men, make available
residence hall facilities . ..,
give adequate representation in
campus affairs to all independent
men and crystallize .. . the opin-
ions of all independent men into
an effective voice on campus is-
sues."
AIM's membership drive will
continue through March. Inter-
ested parties are urged to attend
the next meeting, to be held at
7:30 p.m. Monday in the Union or
to contact Domangue, 319 Lloyd
House, West Quad..
Monte Carlo'
Party Planned
The International Students As-
sociation will sponsor a Monte
Carlo Party from 8 p.m. to mid-
night Saturday in the Rackham
Assembly Hall.
According to Fred Ray, ISA
president, the party will feature a
continental atmosphere. The pro-
gram includes dancing and a num-
ber of special games for which a
grand prize will be awarded. Re-
freshments will include caviar
canapes and punch, "vintage
1948."
Tickets can be purchased for 50
cents at the International Center.
Ray announced that all students
may attend.

of these were the Australian
Waits, who devoted their free time
one afternoon to teaching Benny
Oosterbaan the are of throwing a
boomerang.
Burton Holmes was "ogueing"
his travels back in those days, too.
His shorts appeared with pictures
starring Mary Pickfprd, William S.
Hart, Marguerite Clark, Charlie
Chaplin and Wallace Reid, the
Great's of silent films.
The thousands of students who
attended the theatre in its prime

I

DALE RI EPE

PHILOSOPHY TUTOR

approbation or disproval. When an
attractive girl was on the stage,
they would laugh uproariously at
each word she said, cheering lus-
tily at her every gesture. When the
male member of the team came to
the fore, the entire male audience
would start reading their news-
papers.
During this period of present-
ing both vaudeville and silent
films, the "Freshman Bible" con-
tained an injunction to new stu-
dents against sitting in the first
six rows of the Maj, on threat of
ejection. Legend has it that our
academic ancestors would not tol-
erate hamstringing of their spoon-
ing by the neophytes.
Along this familiar vein, the
Maj advertised itself as the "cozy
playhouse" or the "pretty little
family theatre" and at other times
as the "rah-rah theatre." How-
ever, its entertainment was "polite,
high-classed and advanced."
End of the Road
The day came, however, when
the cozy playhouse became too
homey to satisfy city building reg-
ulations, and the Maj had to cease
operation. In its place, the State
Theatre was opened March 18,
1942, the day after the final cur-
tain came down at the Majestic
Theatre.
Though there was hope at the
time that the Maj would be re-
paired, no work was done, and the
building was fnally sold to the
city. Today, as the'Maj sits steep-
ing in memories of its former
greatness, F. C. Creal, City Coun-
cil president, sits waiting for local
contractors to return their esti-
mates on demolition of the thea-
tre.

Calendar
Cultural and Educational Com-
mittee-Studenit Legislature, 5
p.m. Union.
NSA u Cminittie--Student Leg-
islature 4:30 p n., Union.
Engineering Council-Elect ion,
7:30 p.m.. 111. 24:1 Wes Fni-
neering.
Expetant Mothers' Lecture -
"Hygiene of Pregnancy," 2:30 and
7:30 p.m., Child Health Bldg.
Medical Lecture-Dr. Jonas Ml-
ler of Calif. State Department of
Health in regular meeting of As-
sociation of Interns and Medical
Students, 8 p.m.. Rm. 305, Union.
Junior Girls' Play - Make-up
Committee, 4 p.m., League.
Radio-"Today's World and Lo-
cal Problems," Prof. Robert S.
Ford, 5:45 p.m., WPAG
Michigan Theatre - "Captain
from Castile," 1, 3:31, 6:09 and
8:45 p.m.
State Theatre-"Ride the Pink
Horse," 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 p.m.
Signal Corps
Issues Call for
Trained Men
A shortage of technically qual-
ified officers to fill Signal Corps
requirements has made it neces-
sary to authorize the Chief of
Signal Corps to recall a limited
number of company grade officers
to active duty.
The most urgent need at pres-
ent, according to Major Howard
E. Porter, assistant professor of
military science and tactics, Sig-
nal Corps, is for officers qualified
in the following specialties; Sig-
nal Center operation, photog-
raphy, telephone, radar, radio,
signal supply, and repair and
maintenance.
The shortage exists in both the
engineering and operating fields,
and includes a need for well-qual-
ified instructors to serve with RO-
TC, National Guard and ORC
units.
Current Signal Corps policies
affecting officers recalled to ac-
tive duty is to assign overseas
those credited with less than 27
months overseas service. Others
are assigned in accordance with
their expressed desires insofar as
is possible.
Any Signal Corps officer who
is qualified in one of the listed
specialties and is interested in be-
ing recalled to active duty should
notify Major Porter at ROTC
Headquarters, 512 S. State.
'Marine Class
Closes Today
Men interested in the Marine
Corps' Platoon Leaders Class will
have their last opportunity to con-
tact Captain Raymond L. Val-
ente today, since the current
phyical is being given for the last
time.
Connected with the reserve of-
ficers program, the class is open
to all qualified veteran and non-
veteran freshmen and sophomores,
and veteran juniors.
The class operates only during
the summer and gives students a
chance to receive reservescommis-
sions in the United States Marine
Corps without sacrificing any of
their college education. !

Hopwood Wimners
To Be Interviewed
Winners of this year's freshmen
Hopwood awards will be inter-
viewed today by E. G. Burrows of
the University Broadcasting Serv-
ice on "The Hopwood Room," at
2:30 p.m. today over WKAR.
Dan Waldron, who stood first in
both fiction and poetry, will tell
how he came to write his group of
three stories, "The Man Who
Couldn't Resist People," "The
Capitulation," and "The Misbegot-
ten."
Dale Boesky, winner in the es-
say division, and Mary Kay Wank,
winner of the third award in fic-
tion, will also be interviewed.
Scholarship Wonl
A scholarship of $1,866 has
been awarded to Geraldine Skin-
ner, '40SN, former assistant di-
rector of the 'U' Hospital nursing
staff, by the National Founda-
tion of Infantile Paralysis for
study in orthopedics at Boston
University.
b. A

By DOLORES PAL.ANKER
So you think man controls the
course of civilization. Well, you're
wrong!
At least, this is the belief of
Prof. Leslie A. White, chairman of
the anthropology department and
consultant in ethnology in the
Museum of Anthropology.
Prof. White has expounded his
theory at last in a magazine arti-
cle. "Man's Control Over Culture
-An Anthropocentric Illusion,"
which appears in the March issue
of Scientific Monthly.
"Man must be there to make the
existence of the culture process
possible," Prof. White says in his
article, "but the nature and be-
havior of the process itself is self-
determined.
Culture Self-Determined
"They," -Prof. White refers to
the forces of culture-"will be to-
morrow what their trend of devel-
opment in the past dictates. We
can only trot along with them,
hoping to keep up," he continues.
Prof. White believes that the
statement that education of man-
kind is the only means of attain-
ing a lasting peace is erroneous.
"Strictly speaking," he declares
education . . .. is what culture is
doing to people, namely, equipping
them with ideas, beliefs, codes of
conduct, tools and machines.
Culture Unconscious
"Culture has been evolving as
an unconscious, blind, bloody, bru-
tal, tropismatic process so far,"
continues the articles"; . . . it has
not yet reached a point where in-
telligence, self-consciousness and
understanding are very conspicu-
ous."
Prof. White concludes that a sci-
ence of culture will not enable us
to control civilization, but will help
us to adjust to it.
The anthropologist has recently
returned after a semester's leave
of absence during which he was
Health Service
Treats 13,040
Total Termed 'Not .
Unusual' for Season
The University Health Service
has treated 13,040 students during
the month of February.
The condition of student health
was reported as not unusual as
judged from past records, Pneu-
monia and appendicitis cases were
doubled, but this is partially at-
tributed to the fact that enroll-
ment has increased in the past
yeair.
Provisions recently made for
chest X-ray examinations of em-
ployees in contact wtih students
in fraternities and sororities met
with little response. Students are
well protected against acquiring
tuberculosis from eath other, but
they are not protected from pos-
sible disease in non-student con-
tacts, a spokesman said.
Delta Chi Officers
The new pledge class of Delta
Chi, recently reactivated campus
social fraternity, has elected offi-
cers for the semester.
They are: Fred Morrow, presi-
dent; Claude Batuk, secretary;
John Gryzbowski, social chair-
man; Nick Oliver, rushing chair-
man; Walt Dobbs, publicity chair-
man; Jay Bunker, athletic chair-
man; and Fred Atiyeh, historian.

lli iCn+~:7L __________________

I

visiting professor at Yale Univer-
sity where he conducted a gradu-
ate seminar in ethnological
theory. He also le tured at Har-
vard and Columbia and addressed
the Philadelphia Anthropologic4l
Society in addition to doing re-
search work for a book which he
hopes will be published within a
year.
Europe To Get
Textbook Aid,
Textbooks - puny, ponderous.
new, dog-eared, fetching, repell-
ing-all are considered valuable
by the Inter-Guild social action
committee, now conducting a
dive to restock the barren book-
shelves of European universities.
Textbooks suffering from isola-
tion and neglect will get a new
lease on life in the hands of Eu-
ropean students, according to
Betty Lou Zwemer, chairman of
the committee. She insists that
almost any textbook between cov-
ers will get a warm reception.
The book drive will center in
the various guilds and will last for
two weeks. Any other campus or-
ganizations desiring to contribute
texts are requested to contact
Miss Zwemer at 2-4561. All books
will be stamped, "Inter-Guild,
University of Michigan" and be
boxed March 20 at the Presby-
terian Church.

NOT THE DRIVER:
Man Unable To Control His
Culture, Prof. White Declares

""

Charge Labor
Law Permits
BiasedHiring
INDIANAPOLIS, Mar. 9--W)-A
witness for the International Ty-
pographical Union testified in
federal court today that he told
Detroit newspaper publishers the
Taft-Hartley Law allows them to
reject a job applicant because of
race, religion, or kind of clothing.
A government lawyer who is
seeking an injunction against the
ITU promptly accused the witness,
Max Burns, of proposing "excuses"
by which publishers could get out
of hiring non-union men.
Burns denied this. He said he
was only making an observation to
show the publishers "the wrong-
ness of the law."
He said Congress prohibited dis-
crimination against non-ur.'n
men when it should have been pro-
hibiting discrimination against
people for racial, or 'religious rea-
sons.
Burns is president of the Detroit
Mailers Union, an ITU local.
The Office of the General Coun-
sel of the National Labor Rela-
tions Board has asked Federal
Judge Luther M. Swygert to order
the ITU not to try to cause news-
paper publishers to discriminate
against non-union men in hiring
workers,
Burns was asked what would
happen if a newspaper hired a
non-union printer.
He replied that if anything oc-
curred through no fault of the
publisher-that is if forced by the
law to hire a non-union man--
"we'd be darned fools to upset the
apple cart."

Phone 2-8461

,.. .nom F.., .

'I

IMPORTED HNDMf4DE IJ
A&gA
0..0
330 Manardsree
U<p<-o:y<-o -o- <-o

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MICHIGAN

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JANE lYRE.
ORSON WELLES JOAN FONTAINE
SUNDAY, March 14 at 3 P.M. and 8:30 P.M.
MONDAY, March 15 at 8:30 P.M.
Admission 50c - Tickets on sale at University Hall
KELLOGG AUDITORIUM (Dental School)

:. Milk

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
STUDENTS: Easy cash. One or more
students ' to buy vending machine
business. No license required. Call
6417 after 5. )14
HELP WANTED
NIGHT HELP WANTED. No Saturday
or Sunday work. Alexander Drug
Store. )25
WANTED TO RENT
WANTED TO RENT: Garage, 2 mos.
Call 2-3225. Susan Tabibian. )12
TIP US OFF on your apartment if you
expect to leave in June. Quiet couple,
both grad students, need furnished
apt. In June. Possible 3 yr. occu-
pancy. Thanks. Write Box 67, Michi-
gan Daily. )6
LAWYER and. wife desire furnished
or unfurnished house or apartment.
Clean, comfortable and convenient
to law school. Two year lease starting
June 15. Phone '25-9423. )85
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING: Theses, term papers, ad-
dresses. Duplicating: notices, form
letters, programs. A2 Typing Serv-
ice, 208 Nickels Arcade, Ph. 9811. )28
DRESSMAKING - Suits and Dresses -
Specializing with Vogue -- Altera-
tions -- Call for appointment. Mrs.
L. Ringinen, 2-2604. )91
THINK OF HILDEGARDE'S when you
think of spring. Let us give your last
year's wardrobe that new look. Alter-
ations a specialty with prompt serv-
ice. Custom clothes and re-styling.
Hildegarde Shop, 109 East Washing-
ton, Telephone 2-4669. )87
WANTED
FRATERNITY is looking for annex on
school year basis if possible. Can

TRANSPORTATION
WANTED: 2 passengers to vicinity of
Sioux Falls, South Dakota, driving
afternoon April 2 return April 11. Call
2-7438. )20
WANTED: Riders to vicinity of Tuc-
son, Ariz., one way only in '47 Hud-
son. Leave April 2 or 3. Share ex-
penses. Call Whitmore Lake 4332 or
visit 4060 N.S. )27
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Quad Student. Pair grey suede
gloves between Ann Arbor and Tele-
graph Road. Reward. Call 2-7569. )24
LOST: Kappa Sigma fraternity pin.
Reward. Please call 8612. )19
REWARD for return of knife, chain
and key to Room One, University Hall.
)30
LOST: Prescription dark glasses on
State Street about 2 P.M. Monday.
If found call 6454. Reward. )31
FOR SALE
FOR SALE - Radio. Brewster Table
Model. 5-Tube. Practically new. $22.50.
Call 4736 after 6 p.m. )63
FOR SALE: Portable typewriter. New
condition. Corona sterling model.
Cost $90. Sell for $74. Call Pete 6226
after 7 p.m. )16
LOOK SHARP, be sharp, feel sharp
in my Hart, Schaffner Lt. grey flan-
nel suit, 39R, $40. Dale Blocher. Ph.
8574 8-9 p.m. ) 29
FOR SALE: A Royal portable typewrit-
er with French and German accents,
$50. Call 2-0877. )32
ELECTRIC RAZORS, blue suit, macki-
naw, ,ki pants, sport coat 10% shoes,
shirts. Phone 2-0278 after 9 p.m. )7
1938 PLYMOUTH. Clean inside and out.
Call Lee, 124 Greene E.Q. 2-4591. )26
TWO SHEER DRESSES, two coats, suits
and ,ot4)n ilf 1 ()p lrix'c ixr

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OPENING TONIGHT 8 P.M.
The DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH and the SCHOOL OF MUSIC present
A DOUBLE BILL OF OPERA
"DIDO AND AENEAS"
by HENRY PURCELL
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