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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 26, 1948 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-02-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

EIGHT

THE MtCHI AN DAILY

THE M.CHGAN DAIL

NOW IS THE HOUR
H0ow To Pay Your Income
Tax in Three Easy Lessons

By CRAIG WIL SON
(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is ie first
i a series of interpretutive artieles
on the mysteries of income tax pay-
ments.)
Students without means of de-
fense are going to be on the spot
when Uncle Sam's revenue men
call March 15, for their annual in-
come tax collection.
But the spot .wll not be very
difficult if they follow the direc-

Union ... 0

(Continued from Page 1)

chance to see the campus from
the Union Tower, when its doors
are opened for the annual affair.
Four bowling teams, two wom-
en's and two men's, will exhibit
some of the form which makes
them among the best bowlers on
campus.
There will be afternoon danc-
ing from 2 to 5 and a specialty
dance with the music of Frank
Tinker's orchestra from 9 to 12.
The Union Open House, spon-t
sored annually by the Union ex-
ecutive counbil, is designed to give
men and women students an op-
portunity to inspect and enjoy the
many facilities offered by the
"hub of the Michigan campus."
Tickets...
(Continued from Page 1)
who kept knocking on his door all{
evening.
Carp finally turned up at 11:25
p.m. last night. He said he had
been "sleeping upstairs all eve-+
ring."
Carp, who claims he has never
been to a basketball game, said
that two tickets had been given
to him during a Sigma Alpha Mu1
rushing party Wednesday evening,1
but that he hadn't seen any other
tickets.
Mark Abend, SAM president,
had long since admitted that Carp
had been present at the SAM
house that night, but flatly denied
knowledge of any bootleg tickets.

,ions given by the office of Wash-
,enaw County's Collect or of In-
ternal Revenue.
Tax Returns
Who files income tax returns?
Anyone whose gross income for
he year 1947 was more than $500!
But have no fear, unless you have
'een involved in property transa'c-
tions, received an inheritance or
are the recipient of a trust fund,
you probably don't need legal
council, according to the Revenue
Office.
If you are unfortunate enough to
fall into the above category, you
can take your poison either of
three ways:
1. File a Withholding State-
nient (form W-2) as your return,
if your income totals less than $5,-
000 and consists of wages shown
7n Withholding Statements and
'iot more than $100 of other wages,
dividends or interest.
Short Form
2. File a Short-Form Return
(form 1040) for incomes of less
than $5,000.
3. File a Long-form Return
(form 1040-all the blanks on it)
for incomes over $5,000 and stu-
dents who can claim deductions
amounting to more than 10 per
cent of their incomes.
The Withholding Statement is
the best, and the short-form is a
close second for convenience, ac-
cording to revenue officials. On
both of these forms, the taxpayer
is automatically given a 10 per
cent deduction for charities, inter-
est, taxes, casualty losses, medi-
cal expenses and miscellaneous
expenses.
Form 1040
Form 1040 may be secured at the
Office of the Collector of Inter-
nal Revenue, 207 First National
Bank Building, Main and Wash-
ington Sts.
Form W-2, decked out in a
blushing pink for 1947, can be ob-
tained from employers who make
withholding deductions.
NEXT: So you paid 20 per'
cent of your income to the gov-
ernment during 1947. Hope to
get any of it back?
King Seeley Starts
Factory Ex pansion
A contract for the construction
of a $500,000 factory west of Ann
Arbor and two miles east of Dex-
ter was signed by King Seeley
Corp., Ann Arbor, yesterday.
Construction on the plant site,
which is located near Huron River
Dr. between the Huron River and
New York Central lines, is expect-
ed to start immediately.
The building as the first unit of
a company expansion program.

Co-Op Store
Prices To Be
Reduced Soon
The projected Motor City Co-
o) at Detroit will reduce co-op
store prices here, members of the
Ann Arbor Cooperative Society
were told at its annual member-
ship meeting this week.
Previously the co-op store has
had its merchandise shipped from
a Chicago warehouse. This will no
longer be necessary with the es-
tablishment of a large co-op en-
terprise nearby.
Various proposals advanced at
the meeting 'dealt with improv-
ing the appearance of the retail
store as well as the introduction
of a greater variety of goods and
services tQ include more consumer
needs.
Dividends, based on the valwi
of their purchases during the past
year, were announced for mem-
bers.
The University's economics de-
partment will sponsor the appear-
ance of Jerry Voorhis, secretary of
the Cooperative League of the
U.S.A., on April 27, it was announ-
red.
Five vacancies on the board of
directors w ere filled by the elec-
tion of Marion Cranmore, Clar-
ence King, Kenneth R. Sisson,
Robert S. Waldrop and Douglas
. H. Williams.
Membership in the Ann Arbor
Cooperative Society is 752 persons
at present, and co-op stores gross-
ed approximately $200,000, mem-
bers were told.
Two Students
Win Awards
English Majors Get
Downs Scholarships
Awards of $150 and $250 have
been made to Barbara Jean Du-
bois and Florence Lindamood,
winners of the annual Lucinda
Goodrich Downs scholarships,
Prof. Roy Cowden of the English
department announced yesterday.
Mrs. Dubois of Newburgh, N.Y.,
is a senior now in the honors
course in English and Miss Linda-
mood of Monroe, Mich., is a fresh-
man planning to specialize in Eng-
lish.
The Lucinda Goodrich Downs
Scholarships are awarded each
year to students concentrating in
English who need financial as-
sistance and at the same time
show promise of developing abil-
ity in the use of English.
The winners were chosen by an
English department committee
consisting of Prof. Cowden, Prof.
Louis Bredvold, and Prof. Charles
C. Fries.

A

Daily-McCready.
'KNIT ONE'-Rosanne Swanger, '49Ed., and Ginnie Brown,
'49Ed., follow instructions as Mrs. Van Akkeren explains an intri-
cate part of sweater knitting to them.
RGYLES UNLIMITED:
Knit Knack Easily Acquired
By Coeds at Campus Shop

Calendar
(EDITOR's NOTE: Any organization
anting mn item listed in this column
phlI. of tI vh,) iypreceding th1wevettn .)
Radio--"On Campus Doorsteps"
Series. Interview with Dean Erich
A. Walter, 2:30 p.m., WKAR.
Hockey, Miehilan vs. Colorado,
7:55 p.m., WPAG-Fl.
Sophomore Engineering Smoker
-7:15 p.m., Union,
Inter Co-op Council-"Cooper-
atives and Private Enterprise,"
discussion by Prof. E. H. Gault and
Prof. Z. C. Dickinson. 8:15 p.m.,
Robert Owens House. 1017 Oak-
land.
B'nai B'rith ilHMO Foundation-
Student panel discussion, UMT.
7:45 p.m.
Leap Year Party-Square danc-
ing, refreshments, Congregation-
al-Disciples Guild, 8:30 p.m.
Lydia Mendelssohn -- "The
Great Glinka," Russian movie,
8:30 p.m.
Michigan Theatre-' "Lured," 1,
3, 5, 7 and 9 p.m.
State Theatre--"The Flame," 1,
3, 5, 7 and 9 p.m.
'En sian on Display
At Lca Iarber's
Sections of the Ensian will be
on display at a local barbershop
as they arrive from the printers.
This week, "football" is on inspec-
tion in grandiose style. Much-
talked-about editor Buck Dawson
invites all students to "take a look
at what we have been raving
about."
Also, there will be "open house"
every day at Ensian headquarters
when staff members will give pre-
views of the book. Dawson chal-
lenges all procrastinators to ex-
pose thenm selves to his sales pres-
sure. -

a
O
'..
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r
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.

4

By RAY COURAGE
Up a flight of stairs, straight
ahead to the end of th'e hall, and
a left turn at a door marked "Knit
Shop" leads you to the inner sanc-
tum from whence come many of
those red-hot ideas which coeds
eventually turn into loud colored
argyle socks for some lucky male.
Every afternoon coed needle-
nudgers can be found wearing out
an old davenport in front of a
fern-bedeckedwindow, raptly lis-
tening to answers for their knit-
ting problems given by Mrs. Van
Akkeren, proprietor of the shop.
Dropped Stitches
Even if it's only a stitch dropped
while paying too much attention
to a history lecture, genial Mrs.
"Van" has all the answers, ac-
quired from a lifetime of knitting,
everything from baby booties to
long underwear.
What, to Mrs. "Van" had al-
ways been a hobby, was finally
changed to a business in 1940 at
the insistence of her family. She
spent all her time knitting any-
way, -according to her daughter.
Thus started what has now
turned into something resembling
an afternoon bull session and
seminar in advanced knitting. As
Mrs. "Van" puts it, "I enjoy hav-
ing the girls around here and it's
a real pleasure to help them."
Vacant Hours
Not only do coeds spend their
vacant hours stringing stitches,
Mrs. "Van" revealed, but there
are also a few veterans who come
around for crocheting instruc-
tions. Crocheting, she explained, is
soothing for the nerves.
One of Mrs. "Van's" not-so-
able students, Beverly Bussey, '49,
confessed that during the summer
she had to make the trip here
from Detroit several times because

of knitting problems which
couldn't solve.

she

Another coed, Ruth Rudin,
'49Ed., working on a left-footed
affair, said that before she came
to Mrs. Van for help it took her
four months to get below thej
ankle on her first sock.I
Build a Monument
Someone should build a mon-
ument for her, says Ginnie Brown,
'49Ed., one of Mrs. "Van's" most
loyal and enthusiastic students.
"She is a willing and anxious in-
structor, and her business would
mean nothing to her if she didn't
have the opportunity to help and
encourage the girls who come here
so often."
One engineer, sporting a pair of
skybluepink argyles swore on his
sliderule that Mrs. Van Akkeren is
"alright but it's about time that
she started teaching these coeds
how to knit argyle ties."
At MICHIGAN
MARY
GILBERTSON
smokes
CHESTERFI ELDS
Mcary sa}s:
"I smoke ChesIeryedbs bI-
caUse of/hercigfare/tfe ii es
one such las/I)sing satisf ac lion."
A nation-wide survey shows
that Chesterfields are TOPS
with College Students from
coast-to-coast.

TONYA and SONYA
PIN and EARRING SET
Amusing parallel addenda for spring
costumes, Kasha and Tasha, a realis-
tic twosome available in matching pin
and earring set, exquisitely pearl and
stone studded gold or silver metal.

Earrings . .. $2

Pins . .. $2
piltx lax

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E6 Pagyboy's Yearbook
56 Pages o01Sports
-- Ensiai i

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GOOD

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Listening

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11

FINE
A FRIENDLY

FOOD
ATMOSPHERE

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let ('icej
QUICK SERVICE

Snag Your Man-And Hold
Him With A New Outfit

Fo

You have all these advantages
when you dine at
G RA NA DA CAFE
313 South State
Open 7:30 A.M. - 12, Midnight

LEAP
YEAR

Q Wt

1600
KILOCYCLES

TODAY - SATURDAY

I

NZ

'

50

q

I

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MARSHALL'S

CUT-RATE
365 Days a Year!

Royal or Wine Satin
PAJAMAS
Were $12.95
Sizes 12-16

Lacy or Gibson Girl
BLOUSES
White-Colors $500
Sizes 32-42
Values to $10.95

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Sale prices effective Thurs., Fri., Sat., Feb. 26, 27, 28

$1.35 Value
1 Pound
BRIGGS

$1.00 Value
Bubble-Bath
25 for
79c

40c
LUX
FLAKES
Large Size
29c

$1.00
MINERAL
OIL
Quart
39c

79c.

COMBS - all kinds values up to 75c - on sole - only 9c

50c
ALCOHOL
for Rubbing
Pint
6c

35c
PREP
LATHER
Discontinued

k

Ball
Gab
Crep

Buy A New Wardrobe
During This $5.00 Sale
Dressy or Casual Wool and Rayon
DRESSES SKIRTS
erinas
ardines Values $5
pes to $8.95 $5
Values to $29.95
Add Accessory Magic
for only 98c

'4 -1

00

75c
SHOWER
CLOGS
39c

Above: Smooth crepe for a smooth
junior date, it's full ruffles swirled
into the new S line from soft shoul-
der to rounded hip.
$25
Right., For the bolero, butcher linen
and bright decoration, for the dress,
crepe rippling in unpressed pleats be-
low the hug-me-tight cummberbund.
$3S

EXTRA! EXTRA! Michigan Seal Stationery . . . only 79c
50 Engraved Sheets - 50 envelopes . . . . all for 79c

JI

&

1

$9.95
ARVIN
.. . r .....n i

$1.00
Nat. Advertised

ROUGE

15c
WOODBURY'S
- J -

|I

* DICKIES * SLIPS
I HANDBAGS * BELTS

I

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I [

I I

I

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II

I

$35

I

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