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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 24, 1948 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-02-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

--JTHE IlMCHWGAN DAILY

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CAMPUS LANDMARK:
Harbingers of Spring' Found
Year 'Round at U'Greenhouse
By DOLORES PALANKER but is also used for research and
A familiar spot that is forever experiments with plants, accord-
green on the University campus, ing to Prof. Felix G. Gustafson,
lends strength to the sometimes of the botany department, under
desperate hope that "if winter whose jurisdiction the glasshouse
comes, can spring be far behind?" is run.r
The University greenhouse lo- Experiments are continuously
cated at the south end of the Na- performed by students as well as
tural Science building is the one by Prof. Gustafson in the par-
place, other than those occupied titioned rooms where steam heat
by the hardy evergreens, that re- regulates temperatures ranging
mains green throughout the long from four and one-half degrees
Ann Arbor winters. to forty-four degrees Centigrade.
Many students pass it by each The steam is turned off in the
day and are subconsciously grate- summer when the glass roof is
ful for its promise of spring, but painted white to regulate the
few know its purpose and func- amount of heat and light that en-
tions. ters.
Research and Experiment Tomatoes are primarily used,
The greenhouse is primarily a Prof. Gustafson said, because they
laboratory for botany students, make the best hothouse plants.

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A FRIENDLY

FOOD
ATMOSPHERE

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when you dine at

G GR A iNIAE) A CAPE F
. 313 South State
Open 7:30 A.M. - 12 Midnight

SAI To Give
Contemporary
Music Concert
Group Will Present
OriginalComposition
Contemporary American music
will be featured in the musicale to
be presented at 8:30 p.m. tomor-
row in Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
tre by members of Alpha chapter
of Sigma Alpha Iota, national
women's professional music fra-
ternity.
"Quartette for 1947," an origi-
nal composition by Marilyn Ma-
son, a member of the organ facul-
ty of the music school will be pre-
sented.
Bette J. Bleekman, violinist;
Virginia Hyde, violinist; Sarah
Cossum, violist; and Harriet Risk,
cellist will play the string quar-
tette number. Soloists on the pro-
gram will be Marylee ill, so-
prano; Arlene Sollenberger,con-
tralto; Joan Bullen, cellist; and
Shirley Goldfarb and Patricia
Pierce, pianists.
Samuel Barber, Paul Creston,
and William Schuman are among
the contemporary composers to be
represented in the recital.
U' To Enlare
Test Service
An expanded testing service
available to all Michigan secon-
dary schools on a vountary basis is
being planned by the University,
Provost James P. Adams an-
nounced yesterday.
Present testing services which
have been carried on for 15 years
in cooperation with the Michigan
Secondary Schools Association
will be enlarged, to help all schools
in their guidance program.
A field staff, upon invitation,
will assist in setting up a program
to evaluate their curricula, know
their students better and to plan
a future guidance program.
The service is designed to meet
the needs of all students, not
merely those preparing for college
Work.
Participating schools may sub-
scribe to all or any part of the
service.
Will Raise Fares
DETROIT, Feb. 23- () -Bus
and trolley fares in Detroit are
scheduled to rise from 10 to 13
cents a ride in April, the city coun-
cil was informed today.
NEW PORTABLE
TYPEWRITERS
Rentals
Guaranteed Repairs
and Service on All Machines
OFFICE EQUIPMENT
SERVICE CO.
111 S. Fourth Ave.
Ph. 2-1213

TRUMAN INSPECTS NATIONAL GUARD-President Truman in
his arrival in San Juan, Puerto Rico. With him are left to right:
Rico; Vice Admiral D. E. Barbey, Commandant of the Caribbean

Three Utah Students Discard
Books in Favor of Gold Rush

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:

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OF BC

)STON
rite c~css C
ng ? Perfect to the last

Three students at the University
of Utah have thrown away their
books and headed for the wilds of
Alaska to hunt for gold. They're
hoping to follow in the tracks of
another Utah student who was
able to pan enough gold there to
put himself all the way through
Law School.
When asked why they were
leaving at this specific time, one
yawned and said he was just tired.
Another came a lot closer to the
truth, however. "We couldn't face
midterms after we haven't faced
the professors since the beginning
of the semester," he said.
Scientists at the University of
Southern California are trying to
figure out a way to desalt the sea
as "the only and inevitable answer
to California's fast-growing need
for water."
The scientists will really have a
goal to shoot at too, if the Las
Angeles county board of super-
visors carry out their plan to offer
a $1,000,000 prize to anyone dis-
covering a means of economically
taking the salt out of sea water.
* * *
The folks in Florida know
where their bread and butter is
and they're doing their best to
perpetuate it. Florida Southern
college has established the first
Citrus School in the country.
Now in its second term, the
school has 90 aspirants for the
degree of B.S. in Citrus. Students
have start'ed a Students raom
through nearby citrus groves,
raise trees in their own nursery,
and even publish their own news-
paper, "The Seedling."
* * *
The University of Washington's
student researchers have come up
with an answer to a problem that
might have caused civil war in the
little town of Kent, Washington,
which had two chief constables
both grimly down an office due to
a mayoral mix-up.
The research department has
dreamed up a special I.Q. test
which both constables have agreed
to take. There'll be plenty of proc-
toring on the exam, and both con-
testants have agreed that the top
score will win, ending what the
student paper calls "the comedy of
constables."
Students at the University of
Colorado may now study books
and newspapers by using new
microfilm readers, the Silver and
Gold reports. A 29 volume biblio-
graphy on 87 sheets is on file it'
the library, and more reading
material is being added to the
microfilm files each day.
The school is receiving the New
York Times regularly on micro-
film, one reel containing issues for
10 days including pictures. Film-
ing of this kind saves 98 per cent
of the storage space previously
needed for the Times. Over 600
reels are now available for student
use.
Who says football isn't a 12
months a year proposition?
The University of Texas has
already started spring football
EnICHIGA I
Ending Wednesday I

practice, and according to the
Daily Texan, the regulars and
rookies are in for some rough
contact work :n the near future.
even though October still looks
a long way away.
They don't trust the Honor
System out at the University of
Hawaii according to the college
paper, because stricter proctoring
has been recommended by a com-
mittee investigat-ng cheating on
finals.
Auto Industry-
RaisesOutput
DETROIT, Feb. 23-(')-The
auto industry again is building
more than 100,000 cars and trucks
a week.
It got back into high ground last,
week with the end of the indus-
trial gas shortage. This week, with
several plants working overtime,
total output may go above 110,000
units compared with last week's
approximately 105,000.
Major factor in the upturn was
the return to production of Chrys-
ler's car divisions and the Pack-
ard plant. They were idle for
about three weeks during the cold
weather industrial gas curtail-
ment.
Also figuring in the upsurge is
a steady increase in the output of
re-designed models just intro-
duced. Oldsmobile, which re-de-
signed its "98" series and called it
"futuramic," has made about 2,000
of the new cars so, far. Currently
it is making about 130 "futuram-
ics" daily at its Lansing, Mich.,
plant and expects to reach volume
output by April 1.
With fewer major changes Olds-
mobile's "60" and "70" series mod-
els are coming off the lines at
about average postwar volume.
Also in limited production with
a completely new line of 1948 mod-
els is GM's Cadillac division.

INDIAN RELICS:
Historical Exhibit Highlights
Michigran Lore of Early Days
Highlighting Michigan's histo- which records customs and du
rical lore, from Indian traders on on trade passing the fort, will
Macinac Island to a sprawling be on display.
river town called Detroit, the
Michigan Historical collection dis-
play "Michigan prior to 1850" is Williams HOuSe
being shown this week in Rm. 160,
Rackham Building. O ffces
Designed to parallel Prof. Lewis Williams House recently ele
G. Vandervelde's course in Michi- Duane Nuechterlein presid
gan history, the display features Dick Bender, vice-president;
"Catholepistemiad," original draft Gibbs, treasurer; Jack Fir
of the act passed by the territo- secretary; and Jim White, ath
rial legislature in 1837, which cre- director.
ated the University of Michigan.
Wildcat banks had their hey-
day during the period, and wildcat
paper money which contributed to
the crisis of 1847 is also being
shown. Along with these, are the
weekly listings advising which -- Today and Wednesday -
spects the National Guard upon bank notes were valid.
Governor Jesus Pinero, of Puerto At the turn of the century
and President Truman. Michigan's first publication GLORiOUS.
"L'Ame Penitente," a French
U prayer book, camne off Fr. Gabriel Xtlg+W
Stu ed nt Vets Richard's press in Detroit. This
and the "Mackinaw Impost Book,"
Divorce Less,
Rates Show current
Student veterans in Washtenaw
County don't have as many mari-
tal upheavals as do non-student
vets, a comparison of the county's ON S AVIN G S nr c M
divorce rates shows. -
Of 274 cases handled, by the a ..insured to $5,000. S,.F g
Friend of the Court (an agency of Any amount opens PE Y ANN
the municipal court handling your account a E+Y,.~
cases in which there are children GyAuRrNaEtR
of the marriage) in 1947, there
were 108 among non-student vet- A N N A R B O R E-X-T-R-A
erans, and only eight in the stu- F E D E R A L
dent-veteran classification. Savings and Loan Assn.
"The reason that veterans fig- 116iNs FoAnAs NEWS OF THE DAY
ure so largely in divorce," said 11the.ppourtheAve
Mrs. Withred Cook, Friend of the court House $10,000,000
Court, "is that they are in the age Sits Thursday
group where divorce has always"THE FLAME
been more prevalent. The effects
of the war are no more responsible
than any other disorder."
In the majority of cases appear- ART CINEMA LEAGUE presents
ing before the Friend of the
Court, the education of both par-
ties was not beyond the high ^:- ag qCtISIC«.
school level. Women were gener-
ally better educated than men, t'ft Lfe at Oves of...
and the wife was the plaintiff in ***
75 per cent of the cases.
Average age of veteran couples
was in the 20's. Sexual adjustment,
in ~most cases was questionable or
poor.M
Although no one thing was con-
ceded to be a major cause, per-
sonality disorders contributing to
divorce were such things as imma-T2
turity, failure to assume respon- Thurs., Fr, Sat. - Feb. 26, 27, 28 - 8:30 P.M
sibility and jealousy: Box Office Opens 2 P.M. Daily
Admission 50c Reservation, Phone 6300
Debaters To Meet LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
In East Lansino_
Deborah Rabinowitz and Irwin
Robinson, of the Varsity Debate
Team, will compete with Michigan
State College at East Lansing to-
day in the fortieth varsity debate
of the season..J
The question for today's debate "J
is, "Resolved: that a world federal V .-
government should be established."
Read and Use = _(
The Daily Chissifieds
- -

by Elizabeth Woodward
America's foremost authority on
h yetar. young people's problems
.Iean never had anything like that happe'n to
her before in all her life! She was bursting with
it. She wanted your eyes and both your cars
rocked her way. She wanted you to listen to every single word.
She count4Ad on you to react... surpri e, excitmctnt~nt...igurgles
like her own.
And whit did you do? Were you the perect Iiiii post? Or
) did you lend her only one ear and half your wits? Did you fiddle
with your bracelet while you waited-impatient and lack-lustre-
for her to run down? Were you readying your own story to spring
on her? Did you wait for her exclamation point before you topped
it with a torrider tale of your own?
Some people have ears only for pauses in conversation. Conies
a lull for breath and they pounce. As receivers their ears are out
of whack. They can't let anyone else have too much talking time.
They specialize in cutting other talkers down ... and out. It's easy
YIES trrting will get the reins in your hands. You can snatch a
- " -cue and drive off in your own direction. If you're interrupted in
turn, by "as I was saying" efforts to get back to the starting point,
. " MAYBE you can always dash off at another tangent. You cn leave any
unfinished saga dangling in midair.
r STARSIndifference will take all the steamr out of a story teller."So
YM IC STARSwhat?" will deflate him. It will contradit his intenseness, excite-
ment, preoccupation. You don't have to belittle in words. Your
shrugged shoulder, cocked eyebrow, quizzical smile, divided
AGA I Nattention will do it.
. . . AGAIN g a. npm s.s, e
* *Topping the tale will really put it in its place. "But you ought
to hear this!" makes such a squashing sound. No reaction fron
S BE you except a burst of speed to tell a weirder, funnier, more in.
Y U* triguing story of your own. Really exciting things happen to you!
Why should anyone tell you anything if you won't listen? Why
should they start anything if you won't let them finish? Why
should they share their excitement or their woe with you, if you
won't react? Why worry over what you're going to say next...
when you can brush peoples' fur the right way by lending both
t ears to what is said to you!
N ES A N
/ord for it-
rings anotherVate

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ANNIVEi
SPECI

RSARY
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See that stylin

little stitch. Feel that fit? None better. Who makes
em ? Why, Sandler, of course . .. the

In order that you may celebrate
our first birthday with us we are
offering TWO soft, long-lasting
PERMANENTS FOR THE PRICE
OF ONE during the month of
Febinary. Come in with a friend
and save from $10.50 to $25.00.
BEAUTY ARBOR
1315 S. University Phone 7156
MUSICAL
SUPPLIES
REEDS-STRINGS
We carry VAN DORN REEDS
Complete
Musical Repair
PAUL'S
MUSICAL REPAIR
309 E. Washington Ph. 8132

a champio

greotest nome in sport shoest

$795

.6

VAN BOVEN SHOES
11 NICKELS ARCADE

f.

Read Kathleen Hughes'
daring and exciting first novel
"NOT QUITE A DREAM"
only $3.00
The 1946 Avery Hopwood Award Winner
S" 1 l ' - - n
Meet Ann Arbor's newcst successful authoress at a special auto-

FOOTBALL .
BASKETBALL
TRACK. . OL
SWIMMING .

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HOCKEY

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MICH IGA
Take our w
MAY 15th b

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