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January 16, 1948 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-01-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ii;i-1T

______________ ______ _______ _______ THir S_ ic AT- l 2i TDAILX _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

V ARIED OPINIONS:
Hindu Students Comment On
a .1ndi's fites' Pe iltntl Fast

By KEN LOWE
Hindu students on campus ex-
pressed varying degrees of p
prehension over the consequences
of IvIohandas K. Gnndhis latest
fast, according to interviews yes-
,erday.
"Personally, I don't like it at ,
this juncture," said Rohit Desai,
"The fast will create worry on the
part of both the leaders and the
people. If trouble breaks out, it
will break out with double vio-
lence."
Leela Desai, president of the
campus Hindustan Association,
also expressed concern over Gand-
hi's fast for communal peace, now
in. its fourth day. "The Hindus
would hold the Moslems respon-
sible and would probably seek re-
venge," she said.
Ranganathan Shankar, on the
other hand, said that he aid not

think 1lt the fast will have seri-
ti., uli. T u ncj~ffl('e( "1 t a lot of
good may come of it," he added.
A.(ked why G(andhi exerts suh1
gt l: Iinfluence i"in India, Leela:.
Icsai replied, "Because he arouseC(I
the desire for independence and
ichieved it in 27 years. He has in-
'luenced every phase of Indian
life and his followers imitate him,
gven in their dress. It is said that
Nehru is the head of the country,,
while Gandhi is its soul."
Sha nkar explained Gandhi's
great influence in terms of the
Hindu leader's philosophy. "Gand-
hi has been influenced by Tols-
toy," he said. "But, while Tolstoy
couldn't forget that he was an
aristocrat, Gandhi has merged
himself with the common man.
Where Tolstoy failed, Gandhi suc-
ceeded to a much greater extent."

I

Continuous
Dai ly
from 1 P.M.

Weekdays
35c to 5 P.M.

TODAY AND SATURDAY

Construction
To Begin on
Observatory
Construction will be begun soon
on a new $260,000 astronomy ob-
servatory in University - owned
8tinehfield Woods, near Ann Ar-
bor, President Alexander G. Ruth-
von announced yesterday.
Equipped with a 24-inch reflect-
ing telescope of the recently-per-
fected Schmidt-type, the two-
story observatory will also include
a shop and utility rooms, offices,
a photographic darkroom, and a
library. It will be completed within
the year, President Ruthven said.
Primarily designed to expand
the teaching facilities of the as-
tronomy department, the observ-
atory will also be. used to carry
on a major program of research on
galaxies and the Milky Way, as
well as observing the solar system,
comets, and asteroids, he said.
The new-type telescope, which
utilizes a correcting lens to photo-
graph a larger portion of the
image as reflected from the 24-
inch mirror, will enable astron-
omers to photograph a field six
degrees in diameter, roughly
twelve times the diameter of the
moon.
When completed, the new proj-
ect will be the fourth observatory
to be put into operation by the
University.
With the solar research being
done at the McMath-Hulbert Ob-
servatory at Lake Angelus, the
University observatory, and the
Lamont-Hussey Observatory in
South Africa, the University will
be equipped to work on almost
any type of astronomical problem
Prof. Leo Goldberg, chairman of
the astronomy department, ex-
plained.
The pig was used as a scav-
enger before it was discovered that
the flesh was good to eat, accord-
ing to the Encyclopedia Britan-
nica.
YUM! YUM!
1/4 CHICKEN
Waffle Fried Potatoes
Hot Rolls Salad
$1.00
.Willeri0 J
BOX LUNCH
SERVICE
4 P.M. until 2 A.M. Daily
12 noon until 11 P.M. Sunday
WE DELIVER
Phone 2-7171

Job Future Looks Promising
For February ' Gradu.!t e :
y .0 ANNE MiSNEk most everywher . 'Tir<? i
Despite the rumors of a dtePres baseilnedhIvlA
abul it doe sknb 1"a'tlook li kad Fe!)i 1W1 ;0
uary 'i-raduItes will be forced to ent.
sell apples for a while yet. It will probably be soil
While the demand for college harder for women anIut
graduates is not quite as great find work than fo-r men. F:
xs it was during the war, it is ers prefer men for many j(
pretty certain ,hat almost all of cause they stay on 1 !e job
them can find suitable jobs, ac- longer. Although figures a
cording to the records of the Bur- available for all fields, bot
eau of Appointments and Occu- lines and department stoi
pational Information. that the average woman e
Technical Jobs marries within a year and
Technical jobs of almost all after starting her job.
kinds are abundant. Aircraft ____________
companies in particular need men
with technical training. Both men
and women graduates with train-
ing in chemistry, physics, bacteri-
ology, forestry, or engineering
should have little difficulty get-
ting jobs in these fields.
The business world will also be\VA LL
viewing February graduation cere-
monies with interest. Jobs are "T is-
available in accounting and retail-
ing, and graduates can enter al-
most any field if they are able to
start in a stenographic or secre-
tarial capacity.
Probably the most difficult
fields for graduates to get into at
present are radio, advertising and
the newspaper industry. Radio,
especially, is over-staffed, and
when there are openings the pre-
ference is generally given to men.
Teachers Needed Y__d.da
Teachers are still in demand al-

with JOSEPH SCHILDKRAUT

1,

N-.--

I-

Cape of
Good Hone

- Also
Ain't Nature
Grand

1

World
News

I

i
1
t
,
f'
t

I

J ---- . - -.

Coming Sunday!

Fred MacMurray

"SI NGAPORE"

- - -NN~i

11

U

ART CINEMA LEAGUE

c s- c S n I s

2ND CHARLIE CHAPLIN
FESTIVAL

Fri. - Sat., Jan. 23 - 24

7:30 P.M.
7:30 P.M.

Sun., Jan. 25

3 P.M.

Admission 5 Dimes or its equivalent
Proceeds of All Performances
to go to March of Dimes
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

- I

'

NSA To Op'en
Letters Will Promote
Broad Discussions
Those students left unplagued
by writers cramp after finals will
be given a"double opportunity to
brush up on penmanship and for-
eign languages, with the organi-
zation of the foreign students cor-
respondence exchange on campus.
Organized under the direction
of the campus National Student
Association, the exchange will
give students "a chance to dis-
cuss pending world problems with
people actually in international
crises," according to Dick Cort-
right, exchange director.
Foreign students have request-
ed "pen-pals" interested in trav-
el, reading, music, politics, phil-
osophy, medicine, current affairs
and gene al subjects.
. Interested students should write
Cortright at 305 Tyler House, giv-
ing a summary of topics for cor-
respondence, location and type of
person preferred for correspond-
ence.
Veterans . .
(Continued from Page 1)
Campbell closed his statement
with the comment that he liked
the "more mature women."
A lesser degree of criticism was
expressed by Richard Ahlbeck,
whowill receive his degree from
the engine school.
After two years away, Ahlbeck
found that the present system
suffers in comparison to the pre-
war standards because the courses
are "not as well integrated and
the classes too crowded."
Being an engaged man, Ahl-
beck felt that he could make no
comment on the maturity of cam-
pus coeds.
A returned woman veteran, Vir-
ginia Kobach, lit school senior,
said that she found little diffi-
culty in resuming where she had
left off five years ago.
Three years in the service, she
explained, had proven to her
that in all fields it is necessary to
have a degree to get a good job.
Back on campus for the first
semester, she continued, her im-
pression was that the attitude of
the returned veterans was more
mature, while the women still
seemed immature.

As
5ti

NAWN

u. I

A REF
S PECTATOI

RESHING
I TREATMENT

R

"RE DST ON E"
On the famous
218 Johansen last

M

from basically
good beginnings'.. .
,.comes "the form
---divinely fair."
Johansen's Blue
Bird on the
No. 218 last
in thrush brown
with beige
inserts.
Town brown or
red calfskin.
1295

Hear the
ABC Network's
METROPOLITAN
OPERA
AUDITIONS
ON THE AIR

Women who have long
cherished the freedom found
in Johansen's famous No. 218
last are making the "Redstone"
a closed-up classic these days.

J

U

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