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January 11, 1948 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-01-11

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M lF Ta IHGA At
t__ _-_ ______ ____. .___ ___ ___- _

l UNDriY; J.UirRY1

f ht ear l
f i fftyghthYer

I'D RATHER BE RIGHT:
'Volunatary' Price Slash,

DAILY OFFICIAL BULETIN

Edited and managed by students of the Uni-
versity of Michigan under the authority of the
Board in Control of Student Publications.
John Campbell.................Managing Editor
Nancy Helmick................General Manager
Clyde Recht ..........................City Editor
Jean Swendemen .............Advertising Manager
Edwin Schneider..............Finance Manager
Stuart Finlayson ...............Editorial Director
Lida Dales ........................Associate Editor
Eunice Mintz ....................Associate Editor
Dick Kraus ..........................Sports Editor
Bob Lent................Associate sports Editor
Joyce Johnson.................Women's Editor
Betty Steward.........Associate Women's Editor
Joan de Carvajal .................Library Director
Melvin Tick ..................Circulation Manager
Telephone 23-24-1
Member of The Associated Press
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to
the use for re-publication of all new dispatches
credited to it or otherwise credited in this news-
paper. All rights of re-publication of all other
matters herein also reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, as second class mail matter.
Subscription during the regular school year by
carrier, $5.00, by mail, $6.00.
Member, Assoc. Collegiate Press, 1947-48
Editorials published in The Michigan Daily
are written by members of The Daily staff
and represent the views of the writers only.
NIGHT EDITOR: ARTHUR HIGBEE
Peace by Sword
T MUST BE with sheepishness that the
State Department announces a decision to
aid the Greek government in the war on the
guerrillas', coming as the announcement
does, so sharp on the heels of the contentions
of Henry Wallace that our present foreign
policy is leading us inevitably to a third
World War. American Marines are poised
in the Mediterranean Sea for only one rea-
son. Tanks and guns are not standard
equipment on a winter cruise to Africa.
American troops are in that area to
fight. They are there to support the fight
of the GreeU Army against Greek guer-
rillas in the "spring offensive." They are
to back up a $15 million American invest-
ment not in European recovery, but in fur-
ther European warfare.
And for what purpose is this war to be
fought? Is it as Wallace contends, for the
purpose of protecting American oil in the
Near East? We were certainly not as eager
to continue our democratic crusade in Pal-
estine, after the firm warning from the
Arabs that America had "not yet done any-
thing to endanger its oil interests." Simi-
larly, we must stay IN the Greek question,
as the guerrilla forces grow more hostile
towards us daily and would hurt our business
if they got into power.
Of the two groups, the guerrillas are the
closest to being democratic, if any compari-
son can be made. At least, they ask but a
voice in their own government. And not all
the guerrillas can be assumed to be Com-
"nunists. Some are democracy-loving Greeks
who realize the threat to their freedom in
the unwanted Royalist regime.
We have made our decision-our Ma-
rines are waiting at sea-waiting perhaps
for the morning of World War III, when
Pearl Harbor moves to Athens. That is
Greece, 1948, the first step in something
new for Americanism, peace by the sword.
Rather than give one inch in our Vanden-
bergish "Get tough with the Communists"
policy, or rather than admit that we are
really taking care of our own interests, we
will try out our new atomic weapons. There
is one consolation in our new actions. It is
the easiest way in the world to find out
whether or not the Russians actually have
an atomic bomb.
Don McNeil

By SAMUEL GRAFTON
CONSERVATIVES have been yelling that
the "voluntary way" is the best way to
fight inflation. Perhaps the time has come
to call them on it, to ask them to produce it,
and put it into operation. What is the "vol-
untary way"? Is there such a way, and does
it have content, or is this just a convenient
phrase with which to fight any and all ra-
tioning and price control proposals? I mean,
when you open the package labeled "Volun-
tary Way," what do you find inside?
It is to test out the voluntary way that I
have proposed a campaign to cut all prices,
on all goods, at all levels, retail, wholesale
and factory, by 5 percent, as of a selected
day. This would be, at- the least, a demon-
stration against inflation, and a massive
one. As to whether it would cure the evil,
I don't know, but it would certainly ease the
pinch that is beginning to be felt in the
retail stores. Dollar volume was up last year,
but unit sales, the actual physical movement
of goods, was down ? percent below a year
ago, which is bad news for employment.
I don't consider that a general 5 percent
Wallace Candidac y
AST SPRING before Henry Wallace's
amazing character had fully asserted
itself in the realm of presidential politics,
it was doubted in these columns that he
would run as a third party candidate for
president.
Now that he has contradicted this belief,
it is possible to view Wallace in another
light. He is not a politician today and he is
not trying to be one. He is so completely
wrapped up in his sincere object to the
United States' foreign policy that he has
put aside all the politics he must have learn-
ed in his years with the administration in
favor of honest action.
This one fact makes it impossible to judge
him on the same basis with the other poli-
ticians of the day. He has denied the power
of American politics.
Wallace is making an open appeal to the
people. A thing unheard of in American
political life. He has no end in mind but
getting what he believes to be the will of
the people down on paper.
He cannot expect to come anywhere near
to winning the presidential election. Wal-
lace believes so strongly that there is no
real difference between the Republican and
Democratic policy that he is not afraid to
make a Republican victory easier in Novem-
ber ,which he is sure to do.
He is completely honest. A man with this
characteristic in American politics today can
completely disrupt the machinery of political
activity that we have set up. Everyone is
looking for some hidden motive in his can-
didacy, but they are not likely to find one.
The apparently stupid political action of
Wallace, while his judgement is subject to
serious question, can be nothing more than
his idealistic interest in the American people.
-Al Blumrosen
What9s on Wax
ONE of the tastiest bop sides to be issued in
some time is Tad Dameron 's "Our Delight"
on Bluenote. Previously recorded by Gillespie
using a full band, Tad's little group does the
complete and definitive rendition of his own
composition. Using the tremendous talents
of Fats Navarro, trumpet and Shadow Wil-
son on drums, the sextet does a clean (less
frippery than usual) run-through of the
simple and intriguing set of figures.
Fats is the talented young trumpeter who
has caused much excited talk in the trade
recently and Wilson has long been rated as
one of the best rhythm men in the business.
The reverse, "The Squirrel" doesn't quite
measure up harmonically to the other side,
but scores in its own way. Wilson effectively
carries most of the rhiythm load, and Tad

chords around the intro and coda. Navarro
sounds somewhat forced but still manages
to throw his weight around. Recording is
clear, balance is good.
Kay Starr, whose voice and technique
have had vocalists going around shaking
their heads for years, is finally beginning to
share the loot some of her less talented col-
leagues have been getting. Snagging a long-
term pact with Capitol, her first record,
"Share Croppin' Blues," showcases her start-
lingly different huskiness to good advantage.
Reverse is an ancient Von Tilzer tune which
magically comes to life under Kay's careful
ministrations.
Stan Kenton's first side featuring his new
band has been recently released. "Unison
Riff," another Rugolo script, has a provoca-
tive intro with Jack Constanza's bongo along
with Chico Alvarez' lucid trumpet adding a
neat effect. Art Pepper gets off a good bop
alto solo, and then comes the deluge. Five
trumpets lead the pack in a screaming for-
tissimo finish. June Christy, in singing "I
Told Ya I Love Ya, Now Get Out," is prob-
ably wondering when she will be able to
record some.good material.
Dave Grippey

eut would produce a paradise here on
earth, but it might buy us a few months
for further reflection, and it might help
avert some strikes.
France tried a general 5 percent cut a
year ago, with inconclusive results, but
France was in too much trouble by that tine
for her experience to be binding on us. Even
so, there was a wonderful feeling of exhil-
aration in Paris when the "Baisse 5" signs
appeared on all the shops, and the people
did, I think, begin to get some confidence
that inflation could be mastered.'
We are in a far better situation than
France was then; we are so rich that we
were saved (some think) from a recession
last year by the fact that we had a poor
corn crop, which scared buyers and restoked
the inflationary furnace. There are not
many countries left which are so prosperous
that a disaster improves business conditions,
and a general 5 percent price reduction here
might have really large consequences.
It would have to be done simultaneously,
in every shop, in every village, town and city.
It would not be necessary or even advisable
to change price tags; we could merely deduct
5 percent at the bottom of every sales slip,
or from every monthly bill, to emphasize the
savings produced by the cut.
Is the "voluntary way" capable of con-
ducting such an operation? Who volun-
teers, under the "voluntary way," and who
calls for volunteers? Is the "volunteer
way" an active way, or is it only passive?
Is this merely the name that inertia wears
when it goes to Congress?
It will be sad if the phrase "voluntary
way" turns out to mean only a way of wait-
ing listlessly for an unnecessary recession.
The words themselves would make a sour
caption under a picture of the unemployed
during a Presidential campaign. The ques-
tion before us is whether we are the masters
of our fate to the extent of, and it's not
asking a lot, 5 percent.
(Copyright, 1947, New York Post Syndicate)
- 2

IT SO
HAPPENS . .
0 Brooms and Bolts

Testing Hypothesis.. .
For a recent test of an entire lecture
group, one section instructor designated a
room in Angell Hall for the event. When
the crucial time came around, the class was
milling outside the assigned room looking
confused and sheepish.
No one even tried to seat himself in the
instructor's choice of a testing ground.
It was a janitor's closet.
S* *
Keep Moving ...
Attention, Michigan Union Ballroom:
'United Press' Tokyo bureau reports the
following item-
"Japanese police warned dance-hall
managers to halt "no moving" dancing.
They said it's immoral.
"Police charged the management per-
mitted couples to engage in embracing
without taking steps in the corners of thl
dimly lit dance halls."
New Twist ...
Freshmen-are-not -'so-green-as-they-seem
department. That well-known college stu-
dent ingenuity came to the fore again at the
end of the fall semester, as freshmen gave
a new twist to the semester-end rush to the
card catalogues. Foreseeing pointed and ex-
plicit questions would be asked on their
1,500 page outside reading assignment in
History 11, just before Christmas vacation
several freshmen spent long hours in the
General Library looking up books cited in
the suggested bibliography.
They were looking for books the General
Library didn't have.
Discrepancy
A RECENT Associated Press story on U.S.
military aid to Greece mentioned 1,000
marines ordered to the gediterranean area.
The insinuation was that they are going
particularly prepared to land in Greece.
Elmer Davis said in his nightly broad-
cast that "the State Department is not
planning to send American troops to fight'
the Greek guerrillas." He mentioned the
marines, too, but indicated they were "to
fill out the Navy's complement of marines
in the Mediterranean," without reference to
Greece. Davis also pointed out that 1,000
marines wouldn't do much good in the Bal-
kan mountains, in support of his contention
that they are going "for waterfront dis-
turbances" only.
This apparently unimportant discrepancy
is really not so trifling. The Balkan situa-
tion is inflammable enough without mis-
representation.
And the conclusions that will be drawn
from the AP's report can be judged fairly
only on the basis of accurate information.
-Phil Dawson.

(Continued from Page 3) t
of Biological Chemistry. The pub-
lie is invited.
University Lecture: Dr. Paul R.t
Cannon, Professor of Pathology,.
University of Chicago, will lecture
on the subject, "The Problem of
Protein Hydrolysates for Intra-
venous and Oral Alimentation,"I
Tues., Jan. 13, 4:15 p.m., Rack-i
ham Amphitheatre; auspices of<
the Department of Biologicali
Chemistry. The Public is invited.
Academic Notices
Correction in Spring Semester
Time Schedule Mathematics 277:]
In the Spring Semester Math 277
will be offered MWF at 10.
Mathematics Concentration Ex-
amination:
Students intending to concen-
trate in mathematics. in the Col-
lege of Literature, Science, and1
the Arts are reminded that thet
requirements are as follows:
1. 60 hours of academic credit.
2. Completion of the Group Re-l
quirements.
3. Completion of Mathematics
54.
4. Passing the concentration ex-
amination.
The Concentration Examination
covers undergraduate mathemat-
ics through calculus. The student
is not expected to make any spe-
cial preparation for this examina-
tion which will next be offered on
Wed., Jan. 14, 4 p.m.. Rm. 3011
Angell Hall.
English Concentration (General
Program)
The English Concentration Ad-
visers, General Program, will keep
special office hours during the
week of January 12th for students
who wish to arrange their pro-
grams for the second semester. All
students who are able to see their
advisers in the week of January
12th should do so in order to
lighten the advisory load during
registration week.
English concentrators (General
Program) are assigned to advisers
alphabetically, as follows:
A-G Morris Greenhut, 3216 A.H.
H-P, H. V. S. Ogden, 3220 A.H.
Q-Z, Karl Litzenberg, 2212 A.H.
Each adviser has posted special
conference hours on his office
door.
Classical Rrepresentations Sem-
inar: Mon., Jan. 12, 4:15 p.m.,
Rm. 3010, Angell Hall. Prof. R.
M. Thrall will speak on "Decom-
position of Tensor Spaces."
Orientation Seminar: 7 p.m..,
Mon., Rm. 3001, Angell Hall. Pal-
inbollic Symposium on the Gud-
ermannian and a talk by Mr. Nim-
merer on "An Introduction to
Kron's Method of Sub-Spaces."{
Concerts
University Symphony Orches-
tra, Wayne Dunlap. conductor, as-
sisted by the University of Michi-
gan Choir under the direction of
Raymond Kendall, will present a
program at 7 p.m., Sat., Jan. 17,
Hill Auditorium, as a feature of
the Midwestern Conference for
School Vocal and Instrumental
Music being held in Ann Arbor,
Fri., Sat., and Sun., Jan. 16-18.
The orchestra and choir, with Wil-
fred Roberts, trumpet soloist, and
Donald Hostetler, baritone solo-
ist, will play compositions by Von
Weber, Haydn, Strauss, Brahms,
Billings, Fine, and Effinger.
The general public will be ad-
mitted without charge.
Recital of French Songs: Prof.
Arthur Hackett, of the Voice De-
partment, School of Music, will
give a recital of French songs on

Tuesday, Jan. 13, at 4:10 p.m.,
Rackham Assembly Hall; auspices
of Le Cercle Francais. The general
public is invited.
Exhibitions
Architecture Building: Taliesin
and Taliesin West, from Life
Magazine Photographic Exhibits;
through Jan. 19.
Museum of Art: PRINTS BY
MATISSE AND PICASSO, EURO-
PEAN POSTERS, FIFTY LATIN
AMERICAN PRINTS; through
January 18. Alumni Memorial
Hall: Tuesday through Saturday,
10 to 12 and 2 to 5; Sunday, 2 to
5; Wednesday evening, 7 to 9. The
public is invited.
Museums Building, rotunda.
"Art of Melanesia,' through Feb.
29.
Events Today
Alpha Kappa Psi, Professional
Business Fraternity, formal initia-

tion, Sun., .Jan. 11, 2 pm., Chapter
house.
Delta Sigma Pi, professional
Business Administration fraterni-
ty: Formal initiation, Sun., Jan.
11. 1 p.m., Rm. 324, Michigan Un-
ion.
Hot Record Society: 8:30 p.m.,
Michigan League Ballroom. Busi-
ness meeting, lecture and record
concert on blues. The public is
invited.
Inter-racial Association Mixer:
4-6 p.m., Michigan Union.
NSA Sub-committee on Racial
Discrimination. 2 p.m., Lane Hall.
C'ornedbeef Corner, B'nai B'rith
Hillel Foundation: Open from 8 to
10 p.m. All students invited.
Roger Williams Guild: Supper
meeting, 6 p.m., followed by a
panel discussion of Universal Mil-
itary Training.
S **
Unitarian Student Group: 6:30
p.m., International Center. Guests
of the International Student As-
soCia tion.
Lutheran Student Association:
5:30 p.m., Zion Lutheran Parish
Hall. Supper meeting, 6 p.m. Prof.
William Frankena will speak on
"The Relation of Ethics to Theol-
ogy.
Westminster Guild: 5 p.m., So-
cial Hall. Rev. John 'Craig will
speak on "The World Mission of
the Church." Supper.
Congregational-Disciples Guild:
Supper, 6 p.m., Memorial Christ-
ian Church. Annual New Year's
Dedication Service.
Canterbury Club: Supper, 5:30
p.m. Rev. G. Paul Musselman, di-
rector of the diocesan department
of Christian-Social relations, will
speak on "Christianity and Social
Action."
Gamma Delta: Discussion hour,
4 p.m. Supper meeting, 5:30 p.m.
Wesley Foundation: 5:30 p.m.,
Reports on the Cleveland and
Kansas post-Christmas confer-
ences. Supper meeting, 6:30 p.m.
Coming Events
"Inside Russia Today", motion
picture in color, will be presented
by Julien Bryan, noted lecturer
and specialist in documentary film
studies. Tues., 8:30 p.m., Hill Aud-
itorium. Mr. Bryan will be brought
here as the fifth number on the
1947-48 Lecture Course. Tickets
may be purchased tomorrow and
Tuesday at the auditorium box
office, which will be open tomor-
row from 19 a.m.- 1 p.m., 2-5 p.m.
land Tuesday from 10 a.m.-1 p.m.,
2-8:30 p.m.
"As You Like It," pastoral com-
edy by Shakespeare, will be pre-
sented by Play Production of the
Department of Speech, Wednes-
day through Saturday nights, 8
p.m., Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Tickets go on sale tomorrow in the
theatre box office, which will be
open from 10 a.m.-1 p.m., 2-5
p.m. Students will be given a spe-
cial low rate on tickets for the
Wednesday and Thursday per-
formances.
Phi Lambda Upsilon: Monday,
Jan. 12, 8 p.m. East Conference
Room, Rackham Bldg. Dr. L. C.
Anderson will speak on the out-
look for chemists and chemical
engineers in industry.
"Stroboscopes and High Speed
Photography," will be presented
at the Rackham Amphitheatre,

by the Student Branch AIEE-IRE,
in conjunction with the Michigan
Section, AIEE. Tues., Jan. 13,
8 p.m. Everyone invited.
UMT Conference planning ses-
sion: Mon., Jan. 12, 4 p.m., Lane
Hall. Interested students welcome.
La p'tite causette: Mon., 3:30
p.m., Russian Room, Michigan
League.
Student Federalists: Meeting of
International Committee, Mon.,
Jan. 12, 7 p.m., Michigan Union.
Michigan Dames Interior Decor-
ating Group meets Mon., 8 p.m., at
the home of Mrs. A. T. Scheips,
1511 Washtenaw. Mr. Jack Hend-
ricks, of the Handicraft Furniture
Company, will speak on "Car-
pets."
Faculty Women's Club: The
play reading section will meet
Tues., Jan. 13, 1:45 p.m., Mary B.
Henderson Room, Michigan Lea-
gue.

Time of Exercise

Monday.
Monday;
Monday.
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Eveping

at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at

8
9
10
11
1
2
3
4
8
9
10
11
1
2
3
4

.......................W ed.,
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1F -i., 1
.................. . ..M on.,
..... ....... .......... M on.,
....................... W ed.,
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sat.,
................ .......Thurs.,
. ............Fri.,
.. . ....................Thurs.,
.. ..................... Sat.,
.......................Tues.,
. .. .. . .. .. .. . .. .. . .. ..'T es.,
...................... . .Fri.,
......................Thurs.,
.......................Mon.,
.......................Wed.,

January
January
January
Japuary
January
January
January
January
January
January
January
January
January
January
January
January
January

21,
23,
26,
19,
28,
24,
29,
30,
22,
24,
27,
20,
30,
29,
19,
21,
28,

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5

classe . .....................Wed.,

SPECAL PERIODS

Economics 101 )
English 1, 2, 106, 107 ).
Speech 31, 32 )
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 31, 32, )
61, 62, 91, 92, 153 )
Spanish 1 )
Soc. 51, 54, 90 )
German 1, 2, 31, 32, 35 )
Spanish 2, 31, 32 )
Psychology 31 )
Chemistry 1, 3, 4, 5E, 6, 7 )
Hist. 11, Lec. Section II )
Ec. 51, 52, 53, 54 )

.........*Mon., January 19, 2- 5
.... *Tues., January 20, 2- 5
.........*Wed., January 21, 2- 5
...... *Thurs., January 22, 2- 5
..........*Fri., January 23, 2- 5
. . . .*Mon., January 26, 2- 5

FRST SEF. STER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
College of Literature, Science and the Arts
College of Pharmacy
School of Business Administration
School of Education
School of Forestry and Conservation
School of Music
School of Public Health
JANUARY 19-30, 1948
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the
time of exercise is the time of the first lecture period of the
week; for courses having quizzes only, the time of exercise is
the time of the first quiz period. Certain courses will be exam-
ined at special periods as noted below the regular schedule. 12
o'clock classes, 5 o'clock classes, and other "irregular" classes
may use any of the periods marked * provided there is no con-
flict. To avoid misunderstandings and errors, each student
should receive notification from his instructor of the time and
place of his examination. In the College of Literature, Science
and the Arts, no date of examination may be changed without
the consent of the Examination Committee.

Time of Examination

Botany 1
Zoology 1

)
).. ..... *Tues. January 27, 2- 5

Pol. Sci. 1, 2 ........................ *Wed., January 28, 2- 5
School of Business Administration
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any neces-
sary changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
School of Forestry and Conservation
Courses not covered by this schedule as well'as any neces-
sary changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.

School of Music:
Individual Instruction in Applied Music.
Individual examinations by appointment will be given
all applied music courses (individual instruction) elected
credit in any unit of the University. For time and place of
amipations, see bulletin board at the School of Music.

for
for
ex-

School of Public Health
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any neces-
sary changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
COLLBGE OF ENGINEERING
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
January 19 to January 30, 1948
NOTE: For courses having both lecture and quizzes, the time
of class is the time of the first lecture period of the week; for
courses having quizzes only, the time of class is the time 'of the
first quiz period.
Drawing and laboratory work may be continued through
the examination period in amount equal to that normally de-
voted to such work during one week.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted
below the regular schedule. All cases of conflicts between
assigned examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See bulletin board outside of Room 3036 East Engineering Build-
ing between January 5 and January 10 for instruction. To avoid
misunderstandings and errors each student should receive no-
tification from his instructor of the time and place of his ap-
pearance in each course during the period January 19 to January
30.
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classification Committee.

MUSIC

Time of Exercise

Iame Myra Hess received a well-de-
served ovation following her piano con-
cert last night. Technically her playing was
beyond reproach, and she displayed real
musical intelligence throughout.
The concert opened with an introspec-
tive Bach adagio in which the pianist ex-
hibited fine understanding. Bach's toccata,
which followed, had much of the restrained
sprightliness of the Peasant Cantata-par-
ticularly as played by Dame Hess.
Three pieces by Schubert provided an
interval of melodic relaxation before the
abstruse Beethoven Sonata, Opus 111. When
he wrote this sonata, Beethoven's deaf-
ness had kept him out of touch with hu-
man musical limitations for some years,
with the result that it makes tremendous

Monday

(at
(at
(at
cta
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at

8... Wed
9....... :
10...... M

11...... Monday,
1... Wednesday,
2..... Saturday,
3.....Thursday,
4.......Friday,

Time of Examinatio
nesday, January 21,
Friday, January 23,
[onday, January 26,

8..
9..
10.,

.. Thursday,
- Saturday,
... Tuesday,

January:
January;
January
January
January;
January
January
January;
January
January
January
January
January

19,
28,
24,
29,
30,
22,
24,
27,
20,
30,
29,
19,
21,

n
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5

Tuesday

BARNABY...

(at 11...... Tuesday,
(at 1....... Friday,
(at 2.... Thursday,
(at 3...... Monday,
(at 4... Wednesday,

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