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January 08, 1948 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-01-08

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E MJCIGAN T-l Y

Fifty-Eighth Year
w<
Edited and managed by students of the Un-
versity of Michigan under the authority of the
oard in Control of Student Publications.
- John Campbell.................Managing Editor
" Nancy Helmick................. General Manager
Clyde Re-cht . .......................City Editor
- Jean Swendemen ............Advertising Manager
Edwin Schneider ...............Finance Manager
"- Stuart Finlayson ...............Editorial Director
Lida Dales .....................Associate Editor
Eunice Mint ..................Associate Editor
.lick. Kraus .......................Sports Editor
Bob Lent................Associate Sports~ Editor
'' Joyce Johnson........... ....... Women's Editor
'Betty. Steward..........Associate Women's Editor
Joan de Carvajal ................Library Director
Melvin Tick................Circulation Manager
Telephone 23-24-1
Member of The Associated Press
- The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to
the use for re-publication of all new dispatches
- credited to it or otherwise credited in this news-
paper. All rights of re-publication of nlii other
matters herein also reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, as..second class mail matter.
Subscription during the regular school year by
carrier, $5.00, by mail, $6.00.
Memiber, Assoc. Collegiate Press, 1947-48
,Editorials published in The Michigan Daily
are written by memnbers of The Daily staff
and represent the views of the writers only.
NIGHT EDITOR: HARRIETT' FRIEDMAN
Come Quietly
A LTHOUGH MICHAEL of Rumania left
. th coutry unda ina ten-car special
train, it can hardly be said that the popular
S, oung king received a royal send-off.
A gang of secret agents, according to cor-
respondents, kept the former king's country-
men away from the station so there would
be no chance of a popular demonstration in
his favor. No reporters were allowed at the
train.
No members of the Government were on
)laud to bid Michael farewell.
When he boarded the train about twenty
people, according to reports, cae as near
as they could and waved goodbye. The train
then departed for Switzerland.
Only the former monarch's mother and a
few of his staff were allowed to leave. The
king had asked for visas for his entire house-
hold.
No announcement was made of financial
arrangements between Michael and the
Government. The former ruler owns, or
owned, considerable property in Rumania
aside from state holdings
Thus began the People's Republic.
--Fred Schott
$y DON NUECHTERLEIN
A FAVORITE COMMUNIST LINE today
is that Europe's masses of people favor
the ideals of communism but are being- pre-
vented from establishing "true democratic
governments" by small groups of reaction-

aries supported by American "imperialists."
These people hold up the Soviet system as
the ideal form of government, having such
strong appeal to Europeans as to cause
them to rise in revolt against their capital-
istic systems.
The facts, however, do not substantiate
such claims. Probably the best example of
a Communist decline in popularity is Ber-
lin; where the people have seen first hand
the Soviet system in operation and also
where truly free post-war elections were
held to determine the strength of the vari-
ous German political parties.
On Oct. 20, 1946, the first free elections
since 1932 were held in Berlin. The Soviets
had captured Berlin in 1945 and held it
for two months before the other three pow-
ers occupied their respective sectors, during
which time they established their own mu-
nicipal government made up almost entire-
ly of Communists. Before the election in
1946 the Communists made repeated efforts
to unite the Communist and Socialist Par-
ties, as they had done so effectively in the
Soviet zone of Germany, but this proposal
was refused in Berlin by the three Western
powers, thus permitting four parties to sub-
mit candidates rather than only three.
The returns, from this carefully supervis-
ed election gave the Socialists 49 per cent,
the Christian Democrats 22 per cent, and
the Communists only 20 per cent, with 9
per cent going to the Liberal Democrats.
On the basis of these figures one can see
that the people of Berlin, having seen the
Soviet system at work, are not convinced

I M RATHEIf BE RIGHT:
Fiancial Reviews

By SAMUEL GIRAFTON
HAVE BEEN READING the big-fat year-
end financial reviews in the New York
press, and once again I notice that none
of the experts is paying much attention
to the recently-passed Republican anti-in-
flation law. Here the Republicans have,
they boast, practically licked the inflation
problem, and what happens? Headlines
about a continued price rise in '48, that's
what. It's enough to break a legislator's
heart. You go and solve the inflation prob-
lem, and you can't even get the story listed
among the big financial events of the year.
What's the matter with those New York
financial writers, anyhow? Don't they know
the G.O.P. has just voted to wipe out the
inflation by clean living, hard wishing, and
other voluntary means? Can't you hear us,
fellows?
I have heard of anti-inflation programs
that were too weak to pull prices down, but
this is the first official program in history
that is too weak even to get into the papers.
The other nugget I've drawn out of
reading the year-end reviews is that there
seems to be a sharp difference of opin-
ion about the future as between retailers
and manufacturers.
The retailers say they will take in as many
dollars this year as last, probably more, but
this will be due entirely to higher prices.
They will actually sell less goods. And they
cannot get over a funny feeling that if they
sell less goods, this must mean unemploy-
ment somewhere back down the line. No
matter how many times they figure it, they
come to the same conclusion: less goods must
mean fewer jobs.
Some of them arle quite sharp about it.
The heads of several New York stores
say in the New York Herald Tribune that
customers are becoming resistant and
"choosy"; the head of a Boston store says
he polled his inactive customers and 800
told him they hadn't enough money to
trade with him after buying food, etc.;
and the head of a Louisville store says "a
day of reckoning" is coming as a result of
the dropping of price control by Congrlss.

All regard the increased flow of dollars
they get through price rises as dust and
ashes in the cash register if the result is
reduced production and a recession.
But these year-end remarks by the re-
tailers are almost drowned in a sea of opti-
mism. There are stories in the year-end
surveys about almost every industry you
could name, steel, oil, textiles, transport,
rubber, motors, almost all talking gaily of
increased output next year, though several
add footnotes about "fearing," or "dreading"
or "expecting" or "warning" that they may,
of course, have to solve some of their prob-
lems by - guess what? By raising prices, of
course.
This has become the general quack cure-
all of our time, good for what ails you, even
though it has some of the retailers snatching
at their thumbs.
It is rare that one sees such clear warn-
ings of danger and such demonstrations
of unconcern about it, all mingled and
stewing together on the same pages. Th
most constructive note is General Elec-
tric's action in cutting prices an average
of 5 per cent on a large portion of its out-
put.
Here, perhaps is a tip for the country. If
we are going to try the voluntary way, as the
G.O.P. wants us to, why not do it on a truly
spectacular scale? Why not a campaign to
secure a voluntary reduction of, say, 5 per
cent, as of a certain set day, in the price of
absolutely everything? Why not a real mo-
bilization of opinion, to cut 5 per cent from
the price of every article on sale in the en-
tire nation, in every city, town and village,
all of the thousands of items on the shelves
and in the factories simultaneously and at
every level of trade? . Why not a general
patriotic price reduction? Without wage re-
ductions, of course, for the purpose is pre-
cisely to keep volume up. There is enough
pentup demand for a comparatively small
price reduction to have a perhaps great ef-
fect in smoothing the coming bump.
That would be the voluntary way, but, so
far, friends of the voluntary way haven't
asked anybody to (1 Yanything.
(Copyright, 1947, New York Post Synidlcate)

BILL 11EIJLDIN
' 7 - -
/ j
,
MAULDIN'S ILLUSTRATED ENCYCLOPEDIA
No. 3: "White men are an occupation army that never went
home."
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETI1N

FIRST SEMESTER
14 AM [N A TON SCHEDULE
Collge of iterature, Science ahtd the Arts
College of Pharmacy
School of Business Administration
School of Education
School of Forestry and Conserv-tion
School of Music
School of Public health
JANUARY 19-30, 1948
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the
time of exercise is the time of the first lecture period of the
week; for courses having quizzes only, the time of exercise is
the time of the first quiz period. Certain courses will be exam-
ined at special periods as noted below the regular schedule. 12
o'clock classes, 5 o'clock classes,. and other "irregular" classes
may use any of the periods marked * provided there is no con-
flict. To avoid misunderstandings and errors, each student
should receive notification from his instructor of the time and
place of his examination. In the College of Literature, Science
and the Arts, no date of examination may be changed without
the consent of the Examination Committee.

l

Time of Exercise

Time of Examination

Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday;
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday;
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Evening

at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at

8
9
10
11

..................... ..W ed.,
.Th ....... .....E i.,
.. . ............. ........M on .,
.......................Mon.,

1 .......................W ed.,
2 ....................Sat.,
3 ....................Thurs.,
4 ............ ............ Fri.,

Januaryr
January
January
January
January
January
January
January
January;
January;
January
January
January
January
January
January
January

21, 9-12
23, 9-12
26, 9-12
19, 9-12
28, 9-12
24, 2- 5
29, 9-12
30, 2- 5
22, U-12
24, 9-12
27, 9-12
20, 9-12
30, 9-12,
29, 2- 5
19, 2- 5
21, 2- 5
28, 2- 5

8
9
10
11,
1
3
3
4

......................Thurs.,
........................Sat.,
.... . . . ... .........Tues.,
...............Tues.,
. .................... ..Ft,
......................T urs.,
...... .................M on.,
. .. . .. .. .. . .. . .. .. .. .. .' ed .,

MATTER OF FACT:
Remarkable Gift

By JOSEPH and STEWART ALSOP
THE AMERICAN PEOPLE have received a
remarkable gift for the New Year. It has
been presented to them by a small-statured,
cheerful Air Forces captain called Charles
Yaeger. And it is perhaps typical of the
times in which we live that, although like
the atomic bomb, Yaeger's New Year's gift
has great potentialities for peace, it can
also become an efficient instrument of mass
extinction in a new war.
Yaeger is the first man in the world to
have penetrated the sonic barrier. He has
flown a plane faster than the speed of
sound, which many of the world's best
aviation experts doubted could be done at
all. They had suspected that the speed of
sound was an aerodynamic barrier through
which no man could pass alive. Now that
Yaeger has penetrated the barrier, the ex-
perts will tell you that it is the most im-
portant event in. the history of aviation
since Orville Wright flew his flimsy kite at
Kitty Hawk; that it opens up a whole new
dimension in the science of flight; that it
is a development comparable in its way to
the invention of the atomic bomb; and that
it requires the recasting of many basic stra-
tegic concepts.
They will also tell you, as one Air Force
general has soberly remarked, that Yaeg-
er's feat "will rank with the bravest acts
of American history." It had been at-
tempted before. One of the most recent
attempts was in an English De Haviland
plane especially designed to penetrate the
sonic barrier.
Observers on the ground reported that as
the De Haviland roared into the sonic speed
zone, there was the sudden flash of an ex-
plosion. The plane must have disintegrat-
ed, since no trace of plane or pilot was
found. For years pilots had been saying that
to hit the speed of sound was to hit a stone
wall, and the De Haviland tragedy seemed
to prove it. Yet Yaeger volunteered to try
again. In a small rocket-propelled Air
Forces experimental plane, the XS1, sus-
pended at take off from the belly of a B29
bomber, he succeeded.
It is difficult, according to the experts,
to exaggerate the significance of his suc-
cess. In the first place, it proves that a
human being is capable of surviving the
terrible buffetiig administered by the
sonic barrier, and the awful speed of sup-
ersonie flight. In the second place, Yaeg-
er's flight has proved that a plane of
fairly conventional design can pass
through the barrier. Many technicians
had believed that the job could only be
done, if at all, by a plane shaped much
like one of the German's supersonic mis-
siles-like an attenuated bullet with swept
back wings. Yet the FS-1 is shaped much
like other high speed planes. Inmense
power, rather than unconventional de-
sign, sufficed to force both plane and pilot

strange
sound.

dimension of speed faster than

Yaeger's flight has by no means given all
the answers to the wholly new problems of
supersonic flight, and most of the answers
which it has given are of course secret. But
this much is known. Once the sonic barrier
is penetrated, there are no further known
aerodynamic limits to th6 speed of flight.
Moreover, on the far side of the barrier,
what the technicians call the "fuel-speed-
range ratio" is altered.
(Copyright, 1947, New York Herald Tribune)

ART

THE POTPOURRI OF PRINTS, posters
and paintings now on exhibit in the
University's Art Gallery proves very disap-
pointing, and as a result of the gallery's
limitations, at times poorly arranged.
Prints are often simply finger exercises
for many artists, sketches made in prepar-
ation for a painting. Others are produced
chiefly as a less expensive work of art, for
many etchings or lithographs can be pro-
duced from one plate.
The ten odd prints of each Picasso and
Matisse hardly prove interesting unless
viewed in relation to these artists' more
important works. Alone they are simply
pages from the sketchbooks of two well-
trained craftsmen and give only a small
hint as to the nature of the paintings
which have placed them so high in their
field.
Such an exhibit is somewhat akin to pub-
lishing the notebooks of a great literary
figure, but this showing is so limited by
size as to be insignificant. However "Torso"
a few dynamic lines by Matisse and Picasso's
"The Painter and his Model" are mos~t
worthwhile.
Another gallery provides a dull show-
ing of prints by Latin American artists.
Here many of the etchings and drypoints
resemble book illustrations for those now
musty old volumes published 60 or 70
years ago. The artists, representing a
great many of the Latin American coun-
tries, devote themselves almost complete-
ly to treating the life of the peasants of
their own area in pictorial fashion.
Present also are the three familiar Mexi-
cans - Rivera, Orozco and Siquieros, repre-
sented by prints which amount to little
more than black and white reproductions
of their more familiar paintings. Only two
prints by the Ecudorian Galo Galecio give
some life to this exhibit. His "Fisherman"
is bold and highly inventive while "Chain
Gang" gives fierce expression to this social
evil. Though Lasandy's "Apocalyptical
Cwun nll vnzL f F- 4-. -.J . flwr? rr..w.. ...r'

(Continued from Page 3)
"The Open Mind in Journalism,"
at 8 p.m., Fri., Jan. 9, Rackham
Amphitheatre. The lecture is
open to the public. Mr. Gaertner
will address the class in Newspa-
per Policy and Management at 3
p.m., Fri., on "Future Outlook for
Journalism Students." Journal-
ism students, not enrolled in the
class, are invited to attend. Coffee
hour will follow.
University Lecture: Professor
Paul Niggli, of the University of
Zurich and the Swiss Institute of
Technology, Switzerland, will lec-
ture on the subject, "The Science
of Snow and Avalanches," at 4:15
p.m., Fri., Jan. 9, Rackham Am-
phitheatre.
"Resuscitation from Asphyxia"
(illustrated. Dr. Andrew C. Ivy,
Distinguished Professor of Physi-
ology and Vice President in charge
of the Professional Schools in
Chicago, University of Illinois
the annual Phi Delta Epsilon Lec-
ture for 1947-48. 1:30 p.m., Thurs.,
Jan. 8, University Hospital Am-
phitheatre.
Professor Paul Niggli, of the
University of Zurich and the Swiss
Institute of Technnology, Switzer-
land, will speak on the subject,
"The Minerals of the Swiss Alps
and their Origin," at 4 p.m.,
Thurs., Jan. 8, Rm. 2054', Natural
Science Bldg. All interested per-
sons are invited.
A cadenmic Notices
Metal Processing 3- Foundry:
Section 1 will meet Friday, Jan.
9, at 8 a.m. for class as usual. At-
tendance on field trip at 9 a.m. is
required.
Astronomical Colloquium: Fri.,
Jan. 9, 4 p.m., Observatory. Free-
man D. Miller will speak on the
subject, "Interpretation of the
Spiral Structure of Galaxies."
Concerts
The University Musical Society
will present MYRA HESS, Eng-
lish pianist, in the Choral Union
Series, Satumrday, Jan. 10, 8:30
p.m., Hill Auditorium. She will
play the following numbers:
Adagio, G major, and Toccata, D
major (Bach); Drei Klavier-
stucks (Schubert); Sonata, Op.
111 (Beethoven) ;. and Schumann's
Albumblatter, and Carnaval, Op.
9.
A limited number of tickets are
available at the offices of the Uni-
versity Musical Society in Burton
Tower daily; and after 7 p.m. on
the night of the concert in the
Hill Auditorium box office.
Student Recital: Program of
compositions by students of
Homer Keller will be presented at
8:30 p.m., Thurs., Jan. 8, Rackham
Assembly Hall. The public is in-
vited.$
Graduate School Thursday eve-
ning Record Concert: 7:45 p.m.,
East Lounge, Rackham Bldg.
BACH: Sonata No. 1 in G Minor
for Violin; STRAVINSKY; Pe-
trouchka; BEETHOVEN: Sonata
No. 17 in D Minor, Op. 31, No. 2;
MOZART: Quartet in F Major for
Oboe and Strings, K. 370.
Graduate students are invited.
Silence is requested.

WORK SIMPLIFICATION
(clinic), 3 p.m.; and, WHAT IS
AN OFFICE ANYWAY and
HELLO BUSINESS, 9 p.m., Jan.
9.
Events Today
Four One-Act Plays will be pre-
sented at 8 p.m. in the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre by students in
the speech department; admission
free to the public. "Icebound," by
Owen Davis, "Lucky at Cards," by
Francis Dysarz, "Aria Da Capo, by
Edna St. Vincent Millay, and
"The Boor," by Chekhov, are are
four plays on the bill, each to be
directed and staged by students in
advanced courses in theatre. Seats
will not be reserved and there are
no tickets required for admission.
The doors of the theatre will be
open from 7:30-8 p.m. No one will
be admitted during the perform-
alue of any of the plays.
International Center weekly tea:
4:30-5:30 p.m. Hostesses: Mrs. E.
M. Gale and Mrs. Francisco Ran-
gel.
American Society of Heating
and Ventilating Engineers (Stu-
dent Branch). Meeting, 7:30 p.m.,
-Rm. 304, Michigan Union. Speak-
er: Mr. Geo. Tuttle of the Detroit
Edison Co., will speak on the sub-
ject: "District Heating."
Refreshments.
ALL members are requested to
attend.
American Society of Mechanical
Engineers: Open meeting, 7:15
p.m., Michigan Union. Program:
three movies entitled, "Die Cast-
ings," "Powder Metallurgy," and
"Looking Through Glass."
Gilbert & Sullivan Society:
Meeting, A.B.C. Room, Michigan
League, 7:15 p.m. Pictures of the
Mikado will be available and
schedules for the next production
will be announced. All interested
are welcome.
Alpha Kappa Psi, Professional
Business Fraternity, will hold
Court of Honor this evening at the
chapter house at 7:30 p.m. Aat-
tendance is mandatory for all
members and pledges.
Alpha Phi Omega: Meeting,
7:30 p.m., Michigan Union.
Army Ordnance Association:
Meeting, Rm. 316,RMichigan Un-
ion, 8 p.m. Prof. Robley C. Wil-
liams will discuss "Principles
and Applications of Infra-Red De-
tecting Instruments."
The Association of Independent
Men: Meet at 7:30 p.m., Rm. 320,
Michigan Union. All independent
men are urged to attend.
La p'tite caustte: 3:30 p.m.,
Russian Room, Michigan League.
B'nai B'rith Ihillel Foundation,
Pre-Cram Jam: 3 to 5 p.m. Danc-
ing and refreshments. All wel-
come.
Lithuanian Club: Meeting, 7
p.m., Michigan League. All mem-
bers are requested to attend.
Coming Events
Mr. J. R. Watkins, of the Wat-
kins Patents, Inc., Quincy, Illi-
nois, will give a talk Friday, Jan.
1 at n a m. . (Wsnnfrnr'an,'

Economics 101 )
English 1, 2, 106, 107 )
Speech 31,32 )
French 1, 2, 11, 12" 31+.32, )
61, 62, 91, 92, 153 )
Spanish 1 )
Soc. 51, 54, 90 ).
German 1, 2, 31, 32, 35 )
Spanish 2, 31, 32 ).
Psychology 31 )
Chemistry 1, 3, 4, 5E, 6, 7 )
Hist. 11, Lec. Section II )
Ec. 51, 52, 53, 54 )
Botany 1 )
Zoology 1 )
Pol. S 't. 1, 2 ...... .........

classes ......................W ed.,

....:... *Wec1.,

January 28, 2- 5

School of Business Administration
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any neces-
sary changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
School of Forestry and Conservation
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any neces-
sary changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.

School of Music:.
Individual Instruction in Applied Music.
Individual examinations by appointment will be given
all applied music courses (individual instruction) elected
credit in any Init of the University. For time, and place of
aminations, see bulletin board at the School of Music.

SPECTAL PERIODS

for
for
ex-

.........*Mon., January 19, 2- 5
. . . . ". .Tues., January 20, 2- 5
*Wed., January 21, 2- 5
...... *Thurs., January 22, 2- 5
.......... Fri., January 23, 2- 5
....... *Mon., January 26, 2- 5
...... *Tues., January 27, 2- 5

School of Public Health
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any neces-
sary changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
COLLEGE OFENGINEERING
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
January 19 to January 30, 1948
NOTE: For courses having both lecture and quizzes, the time
of class is the time of the first lecture period of the week; for
courses having quizzes only, the time of class is the time of the
first quiz period.
Drawing and laboratory work may be continued through
the examination period in amount equal to that normally de-
voted to such work during one week.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted
below the regular schedule. All cases of conflicts between
assigned examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See bulletin board outside of Room 3036 East Engineering Build-
ing between January 5 and January 10 for instruction. To avoid
misunderstandings and errors each student should receive no-
tification from his instructor of the time and place of his ap-
pearance in each course during the period January 19 to January
30.
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classification Committee.

Time of Exercise

Time of Examination

Monday

(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at

8...
9...
10..

. Wednesday,
.....Friday,
.... Monday,

11...... Monday,
1... Wednesday,
2..... Saturday,
3..... Thursday,
4....... Friday,

January;
January
January;
January
January;
Januarya
January
January;
January
January
January;
January
January;
January;
January
January;

21,
23,
26,
19,
20,
24,
29,
30,
24,
24,
27,
24,
30,
29,
19,
21,

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5

8..
9..
10..

Thursday,
Saturday,
Tuesday,

Tuesday

(at 11...... Tuesday,
(at I....... Friday,
(at 2.... Thursday,
(at 3......Monday,
(at 4. .. Wednesday,

(at 4... Wednesday,

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