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September 28, 1947 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-09-28

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

S'UIAY, RE"EMM t2, 1041

1

DESOLATE SPOUSES:
British Husbands Plead
For Lost Russian Wives

LONDON, Sept. 27-('P)-Rus-
sia obviously would like to drop
the subject-but sentimental and
outraged Britons are constantly
reminding the Soviet Union that
it is holding within its borders the
wives of 15 Englishmen.
For two years the English hus-
bands, back from military and
diplomatic service in the Soviet
Union, have been trying to bring
the Russian girls they married to
the United Kingdom.
The British husbands, aided
by their government, have push-
ed their petition right up to the
presidium of the Supreme So-
viet, highest authority in the
Union. The answer, which must
have passed the review of Prem-
ier Stalin himself, was the fam-
Illar "no."
C. P. Mayhew, Under Secretary
for foreign affairs, said in the
House of Commons:

LIFE...
;4.25
(Instead of 5.5)

"We are knocking at a firmly
^losed door."
Earl Winterton, also speaking
in Commons, said:
"It's just a drop in the ocean
of the world's miseries. But nev-
ertheless I, a tough politician,
am horrified by the cruelty in-
flicted on these people."
There was a suggestion before
Parliament adjourned recently,
that the plight of the Russian
wives will become an internation-
al issue. There is strong support
for a suggestion that the United
Nations human rights commission
take an interest and introduce
into a projected international code
of human rights the right of any
individual to leave any country.
The 15 desolate husbands have
been drawn together in what
amounts to a club. They meet
frequently in the London flat of
one of them, Alfred Hall, clerk of
the London County Council. Hall
shows the latest photograph of his
Russian wife, Clara, and of their
son, Nicholas, now going on 3.
They exchange the latest news,
and recently got their heads to-
gether over a letter from Shura,
wife of William Greenhaugh. She
was waiting in Moscow, but her
latest letter said:
"I am being sent to Archangel,
help me now."
Greenhaugh had made the
of all Russian authorities in
London, so he went to Paris to
ask for a visa to visit Moscow.
He said he was told to "apply
for a visa next spring."
The husbands have other wor-
ries. Five of the wives have child-
ren. The other ten lately were in-
formed that they must pay the
usual Russian tax for being child-
less-about $200 a year. It isn't
easy to send non-convertable ster-
ling to Russia. A delegation of
husbands visited the foreign office
to see whether the British Govern-
ment could pay the tax somehow.
Foreign Secretary Ernest Bevin
was sympathetic, but the British
Government can't.
The husbands sent a petition
to King George VI, knowing per-
fectly well that he is powerless
in the matter. They pester
everyone at the Russian Embas-
sy, they look up and argue with
every visitor from Russia,
They are preparing another ap-
proach. When Foreign Minister
Molotov comes to London for the
Big Four Foreign Ministers' Con-
ference in November they expect
to remind him and his delegation
as often and emphatically as pos-
sible of the 15 wives in Russia.
Hall said they will attempt to in-
terview Molotov.
Russian visitors hear -about the
wives the moment they leave their
ships or planes. Vishinsky, on his
way to America for the United
Nations assembly, held a press
conference. The first question fir-
ed at him was about the wives the
Soviets refuse to release.
"I am far more interested," he
answered, "in the 150,000 Rus-
sians in the British Zone of Ger-
many who have not yet been re-
leased."J

Senior Photo
Appointments
Close Tuesday
Tomorrow and Tuesday will be
the last days seniors in the Febr-
uary, June and August classes of
1948 can make appointments for
senior pictures in the 1948 Mich-
iganensian, according to Buck
Dawson, 'Ensian Managing Edi-
tor.
Booths will remain open from 8
a.m. to 4 p.m. each day in the
League, Union, Engineering Arch,
Architecture School and at the
corner of State St. and N. Uni-,
versity, Dawson said.
Another booth, with four men in
charge, will open from 7 to 10 p.m.
both evenings in Couzens Hall, he
added.
Seniors of all undergraduate
and graduate schools and colleges
of the University are expected to
make appointments. Each senior
will be charged $2 and will re-
ceive eight proofs from which to
choose.
"With the deadline only two
days away, roughtly 40 per cent of
the seniors have signed up," Daw-
son commented. "but we will be
able to handle the rush and ex-
pect no long waiting lines."
Seniors and other students can
purchase or make a down pay-
ment on their 1948 yearbook dur-
ing the regular booth hours, ac-
cording to Dawson.

COURAGE OF YOUTH:
Armless Boy Develops Feet

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich., Sept.
27-(P)T-Kindergarten classmates
of Bobby Breen got the surprise of
their young lives when they tried
to pick on the handsome little
four-year-old.
Bobby was born without arms.
But when a neighbor boy
swung at him outside school re-
cently, Bobby just lowered his
head and butted the molestor
off his feet.
It is this ability to take care
of himself despite his severe han-
dicap that has won the admira-
tion of a city.
His pleasant disposition van-
ishes only when some well-mean-
ing friend tries to do things for
him in the mistaken belief that
he can't take care of himself.
Bobby hops out of bed in the
morning, picks up a comb with
his toes andreadies hishair for
school. Then he brushes his

MOSLEM REFUGEES JAM TRAIN FOR PAKISTAN-Hundreds of Moslem refugees crowd into
the coaches and climb atop the roofs of cars of a train bound for Pakistan from the Delhi area
in India.

i

FUTURE UP TO UN:
British Decision on Palestine
Is No Surprise to Observer,

By J. M. ROBERTS, Jr.
AP Foreign Affairs Analyst 1
Announcement of the British
decision to get out of Palestine
comes as no surprise.
The British have been restless
for some time 'over a situation
where they were spending the lives
of men and large sums of badly
needed money and receiving only
ill-will in return.
U.N. Responsibility
Now the future of Palestine is
squarely up to the U.N.
Although the majority of the
U.N. investigating committee de-
cided in favor of a separate Jew-
ish state, the suggested borders in-
clude such a large proportion of
Arabs-416,000 to 500,000 Jews-
that there is grave doubt regard-
ing its practicality.
Moslem Opposition
In the face of adamant Mos-
lem opposition to any partition at
all, the proposal may turn out
to be beside the point. A little
whisper from the Arab states that
they might cancel foreign oil con-
cessions in retaliation has sent
quivers of apprehension down sev-
eral spines-far more so than the
Arab threat to break off all rela-
tions with the west and fight the
Jews.
Unlimited Complications
The complications of this whole
problem are almost unlimited.
One suggestion is for the U.N. to
impose a democratic constitution
on a unified Palestine (which
would be something akin to what
the Arabs demand) with safe-
guards for minorities in every dis-
trict strictly enforced by an in-
ternational police force. The idea
was that the two peoples might
be forced to live together under
impartial laws until they became
accustomed to it.
This would mean, of course, that
Captive chimpanzees, given
stout sticks or poles, soon devised
a crude form of vaulting, accord-
ing to the Encyclopedia Britan-
nica. The animals used the pole
as a sort of crutch in this play
activity.

the Jews who want a national:
state would make the greatest
compromise, instead of the Arabs
who- now appear to be holding the
short end of the stick.
Whether this or any other idea
can be made to work in Palestine
without serious disturbances s
a wide open question.

Chaplain Ballinger
To Speak in Flint
The Protestant chaplain at Uni-
versity Hospital, Rev. Malcom Bal-
linger, will give a series of six lec-
tures at the annual School of
Christian Education and Leader-
ship which opens in Flint, Oct.
31.
Dr. Ballinger will address min-
isters, teachers and directors in
religious education in the Flint
area on personal counseling and
pastoral vistation in homes and
hospitals.

l1i

11,x--____.___ _ __

1111

SECRETARIAL and
BUSINESS TRAINING
Enter Any Time - Day and Evening Classes
HAMILTON BUSINESS COLLEGE
Founded 1915 William at State

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own teeth and helps himself on
with his clothes.
At breakfast, he uses his toes
to handle his spoon and eats his
cereal without assistance. His cup
presents no difficulty and he can
eat such things as bread and
crackers without aid. He's also
learning to use a knife and fork,
although he still needs a little
practice.
One of the feats that always
astonishes Bobby's friends is
his ability to use his toes to
thread a piece of string through
small wooden beads.
Nothing came easy to Bobby,
even walking. In addition to his
other handicaps, one of his legs
is three inches shorter than the
other. It was only six months ago
that he completed a special course
of instruction where he learned to
walk.

A

Rear-Admiral Richard E. Byrd

Hon. Arthur Bliss Lane Miss Jane Cowl

TIME...
(instead of 6,50)

Z,(nivePeitV o ( #tictiigaitOratorical 444 ocia'tkn

PLACE YOUR ORDERS TODaYw
AND SAVE - THROUGR
FO L LETT'S
322 South State at N. Univ.
Phone 6363

Hill
Auditorium LE CT U RE

4

Season Tickets Now on Sale
SEVEN OUTSTANDING NUMBERS Nov. 25 MISS J

11ILm LlUL~7LfJLFLFThLLODFLF~L I 11L1L 17
J COLOR
.4
__-4
i1 S1
$14959
infra-red, a cosmic color,
accelerated to the speed
of a far tomorrow :. .
born in a laboratory deigned by FFILTER Il O
for a startling today
Town Brown, Blue Blaze, 20-Fathom Green, Midnight Black

Oct. 23 WALTER DURANTY and
H. R. KNICKERBOCKER
Two famous journalists whose excellent speaking abilities have been
demonstrated in previous appearances in Hill Auditorium, will open
the Lecture Course with a challenging debate. These two men, both
winners of Pulitzer Prizes in Journalism, assure a brilliant discussion
of one of the vital questions of the day.
DEBATE: "CAN RUSSIA BE PART OF ONE WORLD?"
Nov. 3 JACQUES CARTIER
America's unique one-man theater will present his brilliant new
theater-piece. It is a gallery of portraits, in costume, of the world's
great actors and their styles of acting from the days of Euripides of
Ancient Greece, through Shakespeare, Moliere, and the Moscow Art
Theater, to the stage and screen stars of today.
"THEATER CAVALCADE"
Nov.20 REAR-ADM. RICHARD E. BYRD
Intrepid explorer and colorful pioneer in the world of adventure, will
narrate by means of motion pictures and story the most interesting
experiences of his long career. In his previous appearances in Hill
Auditorium he has been greeted by huge and enthusiastic audiences.
"DISCOVERY" (with motion pictures)
MAIN FLOOR..........$6.60
SEASON TIC KETS FIRST BALCONY .......$5.40
(Seven Numbers) SECOND BALCONY .... $4.20
(Tax included)

I

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Hill Auditorium Box Office
After Oct. 23, the box office

open 10-1, 2-5 daily
will be open the day

U I II ~ U

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