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January 01, 1948 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-01-01

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TOURNAMENT OF ROSES
EDITION

LwAO

~Iat4b

TOURNAMENT OF ROSES
EDITION

Latest Deadline in the State
VOL. LVIII, No. 75 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JANUARY 1, 1948

PRICE FIVE CENTS

It

1

Stanford Trounced
49-0 by 'M' Eleven
In First Bowl Tilt
Rout by 1902 Point-a-Minute Team
Causes Indians To Halt Game Early
By PRES HOLMES,
For the second time in Michigan's history, one of its football
machines is participating in the New Year's Day Rose Bowl extrava-
ganza.
The first team to play there was Fielding H. Yost's fabulous point-
a-minute aggregation of 1901. That team rolled up 501 points during
the season while their '4'7 brothers reached a total of 345.
Two Teams Similar
There is still an amazing similarity between the two. Yost stated
in January 1902. "The first three teams offered no real test to the
offensive or defensive powers of the team, and our first real test
was against Northwestern."
His team beat the Wildcats by 29 points, one more than Coach
Fritz Crisler's squad triumphed by this season. However, the '47 jug-
gernaut defeated Indiana 35-0, while the '01 team had to settle for
a 33-0 score.

Michigan Visits
Rose Bowl Again

After

46

Years

1947 WESTERN CONFERENCE CHAMPIONS . . . Bottom Row: Ed McNeill, LE; Bob Chappuis, LH; Howard Yerges, QB; Capt Bruce
Hilkene, LT; Coach H. 0. "Fritz" Crisler; Bill Pritula, RT; Joe S obeleski, RG; Dom Tomasi, LG; Stu Wilkins, RG. Second row:
Hank Fonke, RH; Dick Kempthorn, FB; Don Kuick, LH; Don Hers hberger, LE; Quent Sickels, RG; Jack Weisenburger FB; Pete
Elliott, QB; Bump Elliott, RI1. Third row: Walt Teninga, LH; J. T. White, C; Kiesel, QB; John Ghindia, QB; Gene Derricotte, LH;
Dan Dworsky, C; Bob Holloway, LE; Pete Dendrinos, ET; Jim Brie ske, C. Fourth row: Irv Wisniewski, RE; Lloyd Heneveld, LG; Dick
Strauss, LG; John Maturo, RG; Don McClelland, RG; John Ander sen, LE; Bob Erbin, C; Kurt Kampe, RG; Alan Fitch, LG; Ralph
Kohl, RT; Al Wistert, LT. Back row: Tom Petersen, FB; James At chison, RT; Chuck Lentz, LH; Jim Brieske, C.

Chappuis, Elliott and Co. Favored
To Rack Up Fourteenth Win in Row
By JACK MARTIN
It's been forty-six years since the first visit-forty-six years
since the immortal Fielding H. Yost brought fourteen men from
Michigan to the West Coast to make history-forty-six years since
the Wolverines were the first guests in the first Rose Bowl.
The New Year's Day carnival in sunny Pasadena has now be-
come an annual show. It's come a long way since 1902, and in that
tradition-packed history you'll find one name written more than
any other-Southern California. The Trojans have accounted for
nine of the pageant's chapters.
Now-on January 1, 1948-the first guest and the inveterate
host meet, the team'that helped start it and the team that carried it
on. It's Michigan vs. Southern California.
The champion, of the Western Conference and the champion of
the Pacific Coast collide in the second edition of the current series
promulgated by the post-season agreement reached by the two loops
last year.
One year ago Illinois trounced a favored UCLA team, b a ta.
that will live in infamy on the West Coast. The cross-town neighbors
of the Bruins are out to wipe out the memory of that afternoon.
Although the Wolverines are ranked by the betting fraternity
as anywhere from an 18 to 20 point favorite, the Trojans may well
come through. They've had three weeks to recover from the Notre
Dame tea party, and oesides the Southern California eleven is notor-

- -<

"The Ohio State game proved to

Notre Dame's.
Ranking over
11 Contested
Wolverine Followers
Challenge AP Polls
One of the biggest gridiron de-
bates in recent history has taken
place this year as to whether
Michigan or Notre Dame should
wear the mythical national crown
awarded each year by the Asso-
ciated Press via its weekly poll.
Although the final rankings
ended with the Irish in first place.
p there are many among the Wol-
verine faithful who are pointing
a lop-sided Rose Bowl score to
confirm their convictions that the
Maize and Blue should have
wound up first.
Michigan's undefeated gridiron
team was never below second and
x on several occasions overtook the
Irish and held the first position.
The final p oIl, conducted
weekly by the Associated Press
from the nation's leading spor s
writers, found the Irish fir. t
with 107 first place votes and
1410 total points to the Wol-
verines 25 first place votes and
1289 total.
'I he Wolverines were never more
than 160 points behind the top
ranked Notre Dame eleven and
three times topped them by mar-
gins up to 250 points.
As expected, the Irish started
out in the premier spot, capturing
the October 8 poll, but the Wol-
verines grabbed the next week's
selection polling 93 first place tal-
lies to only 23 for Notre Dame
and outpointing them 1258 to
'1103.
Michigan continued its dom-
inance in the October 22 poll.
grabbing 147 number one votes
to but 21 for the South Bend-
ers. In total points, the Maize
and Blue' scored 1790 to their
rival's 1553.
Then came the Minnesota game
and the Wolverines slipped into
second where they stayed for
three weeks, slowly making up
the gap until the November 19
poll, when they once more took
the lead.
On the previous week-end,

be a hard one. We could score but
21 points against them, although
there was no doubt i tithe minds
of all who saw the game that
Michigan's team was superior."
Most people would attribute that
statement to H. O. Crisler after
this year's tussle with the Buck-
eyes, but F. H. Yost said it 46 years
ago in his resume of the 1901
season.
Whitney Isn't Impressed
As great as this team was Cas-
per Whitney, who was selecting
All-Americans before anyone ever
heard of Walter Camp or Grant-
land Rice, was not impressed.
He listed one N4ichigan man,
Neil Snow, on his 1901 All-Ameri-
can squad, and placed Michigan
third in the nation behind Har-
vard and Yale.
He conceded that Michigan "has
a strong, heavy line and a good
beckfield; but in tle handling of
the kicks, and in highly developed
team play, they are quite a bit
inferior to the eastern teams."
Whitney from East
Casper Whitney was from the
East.
The original sponsors of the
now-famous Tournament of Roses
were not highly- enthused either.
The following is quoted from the
Michigan Daily-News in December
1901.
"All arrangements have been
made for the trip to California.
The expenses, amounting to about
$4000, for the trip are guaranteed.
The Pasadena Tournament of
Roses Association at first kicked
on paying expenses for more than
three days on the coast, but Mich-
igan hung out for six days, and a
telegram was received yesterday
acquiescing in all demands."
The Athletic Association had to
shell out $750 to pay for the extra
three players, however. These ar-
rangements pertained only to the
starting eleven.
Forty-six years seem to have
made a difference. Today it cost
at least $1000 per man to bring
the squad to Pasadena, and no one
seems to be complaining except
the people who can't get tickets.
The Rose Bowl game itself was
a veritable track meet. Neil Snow,
the All-American choice, scored
five touchdowns, (they counted
five points apiece then) in a game
which did not even go the regula-
tion distance.
"In the gathering dusk with ten

Ann A rborites
Flock to Bowl
1,300 Go West for
Tournament of Roses
An estimated 1,300 students,
faculty and staff members will be
on hand to cheer the Wolverines
to victory when they meet South-
ern Cal in the Rose Bowl New
Year's Day.
Ticket Manager Don Weir re-
ports that 1,300 members of the]
University community applied forI
Pasadena pasteboards and re-I
ceived stubs entitling them to pick
up the tickets on the West Coast.
Most of the applicants were stu-
dents with few faculty and staff
members planning to make the
trek.
The majority, of those going
West poured into the land of the
proverbial- sunshine via the two
special trains run exclusively for
the Tournament of Roses clientele.
The "El Capitan" left Chicago
on December a7 and will return
right after the game. Cost of said
trip is slightly over $100. The Chi-
cago Northwestern is also run-
ning a special on the same dates.

Here's flow
KM' Solved
TicketRiddle
ANN ARBOR, Mich., Dec. 10-
(AI)-When powerful Michigan be-
gan preparations for the Rose
Bowl bid against Southern Cali-
fornia, the Wolverines' hard-
pressed ticket office set up a for-
mula for distribution of Michi-
gan's limited allotment of ducats
for the New Year's Day grid clas-
sic.
Sixty numbers were drawn from
a group numbered one to 100 to
designate lucky applicants west of
the Rocky Mountains and 40 were
drawn similarly to designate the
lucky Eastern applicants.
Under an arbitary decision by
the University that distribution
ratio was established for the al-
lotment of possibly 9,000 or 10,000
tickets.
Michigan's allotment was split
in the same ratio, and, starting
with the first number drawn and
continued additions of 100, the
tickets were alloted to the appli-
cations bearing the same number.
Thus, 54, the first number
drawn, and 154, 254, 354, 454, and
See TICKETS, Page 2

HowThey Fintished
Western Conf erence

CONFERENCE GAMES

ALL GAMES

Teams
MICHIGAN
Wisconsin
Purdue .....
Illinois'.....
Minnesota
Iowa .......
Indiana
Northwestern
Ohio State . .

W. L. T. Pts. Op.

6 0
3 2
3 3
. . . .. .. . ...3 3
. .. .. .. .. . .2 3
..... . .. ..2 3
2 4
,. . . . . . . . .. 1 4

0
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
1

172
120
108
130
110
79
50
83
47

40
96
101
88
108
136
90
141
99

W.
9
5
5
5
6
3
5
3
2

L.
0
3
4
3
3
5
3
6
6

T.
0
1
0
1
0
1
1
0
1

Pts. Op.
345 53
171 156
205 130
204 102
174 127
145 179
156 102
129 196
60 150

Pacific Coast
CONFERENCE GAMES

ALL GAMES

Teams W
SOUTHERN CAL. ......6
California .............5
Oregon. ..........
U.C.L.A... ........4.
Montana.............2
Oregon State . ....... ..
Washington ............2
Wash. State ............2
Idaho ........... ..... I..
Stanford ..............0

. L. T. Pts. Op.

0
1
1
2
4
,5
4
7

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

147 20
135 84
94 49
124 39
48 72
92 123
67 86
45 101
32 111
53.152

W.
7
9
7
5
5
5
3
3
4
0

L.
1
1
3
4
5
6
7
4
9

T. Pts. Op.

1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

193
275
174
172
157
171
99
93
92
73

65
111
121
80
145
136
99
149
138
214

iously a team that saves its great-'
est game- for the Rose classic.
On the other hand, Michigan
has one of the most crushing
offensives devised by a modern
football coach. Fritz Crisler has
adhered stubbornly to the
classic single-wing in these days
of the quick-thrusting "T."
What makes the Wolverine mias-
ter-mind's system work, how-
ever, is his sense of seasoning.
Added to the single-wing is just
a dash of "T" here and a dash
there until finally the final brew
is an incomprehensible dish
Michigan opponents can't swal-
low.
But it won't be Crisler who wins
the Pasadena run for the roses-
or Southern Cal's Jeff Cravath.
They'll look on from the bench.
It'll be Bob Chappuis and Don
Doll and Paul Cleary and Bob
Mann and some sub back who
breaks away for a TD jaunt.
It'll be the lines, a big, fast
Trojan line against a small,
fast Wolverine- line. If pounds
forward wall is tops. It averages
are the criteria, the California
210 pounds from flank to flank.
Michigan's offensive unit pushes
the scales to an avenage 183.
The Trojans have two All-
Americans up front-John Fer-
raro and Cleary. End Cleary, and
his mate, Tolman, will be up
against some competition, how-
ever. Mann and Lennie Ford have

or Soboleski
Pritula ......RT....
or Kohl
Rifenburg . . RE .,.
or McNeill
Yerges....Q B...
or P. Elliott

Hendren
Cleary
Murphy

Michigan
Mann.
or Ford
Hilkene ..
or Wistert
Tomasi.-.
or Sickels

LT..... Ferraro
.LG ....McCall

Probable
StartingLine-ups

J. T. White , .- . .. McCormick
or Dworsky
Wilkins .....RG.....McCall

USC
Tolman

Chappuis . .. LH ... McCardle
or Derricotte
C. Elliott . ... R f... ..... Doll
Weisenburger FB... Lillywhite

:

Bowl Tickets Ready Dec. *30
To prevent congestion in Pasa- downtown Los Angeles.
dena, Ticket Manager Don Weir As previouisly announced the
announces that tickets may be se- tickets will also be distributed
cured Dec. 30 at the Edison Build- Dec. 31 and Jan. 1 at the Hunting-
ing, Grand Ave. and Fifth St. in ton Hotel in Pasadena.

WIT'HO(T A PASS?
Yost's 1901 Outfit Rolled 'Mile a Game'

both been mentioned on several,
second and third-string "All"
squads.
Teamed with Ferraro at tackle
is Hendren, who's even bigger
than the All-American and who
was named to the All-Coast
eleven. He didn't operate against
Notre Dame, but he'll be ready
for. Crisler's crew. Captain Bruce
Hilkene and Bill Pritula are Mich-
igan's offensive taclles.
Guard is probably Southern
Cal's greatest weak spot. There's
Don Clark, a fine blocker, a
good tackler, but the Wolver-
ine's Dom. Tomas, Stu Wilkins.
etc., should open up quite % few
holes for Chappuis et al.
Center Walt McCormack wasn't
too strong for the Trojans at the
beginning of the year, but he's
one of the most improved players
on the Coast. He was outstanding
against the Irish. Michigan is
strong in the middle, with J. T.
White, Dan Dworsky, Jim Brieske,
the automatic splitter of uprights.
Southern Cal has at least
eight good backs to match
against the Wolverines superla-

_

The name Fielding H. Yost is
now practically synonymous with
point-a-minute football since his
first Michigan team in 1901 rolled
up 501 points in the course of the
season.
He himself admitted that "dur-
ing the season there have been a
number of remarkable occur-
rences. The team has carried the
ball over five miles; in the Buf-
ff,1,- fatfn l flr, if . wn, v a.',pi

cago, Beloit and Iowa) the op-
ponents made first downs only
seven times. Four teams never
had possession of the ball in
Michigan territory, and but two
teams were inside of Michigan's
thirty-yard line."
Some people might get the idea
that the Michigan team consisted
of a group of giants weighing
well over 200 pounds each. Let's
-.t_-1-f 6S''9i........... V. rJ n1"

< .
:.

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