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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 17, 1947 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-12-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHUGAN DAVLY

LBR IN GPEACE.2
Chinese War God Takes
Up Residence on Campus

A distinguished gentleman with
a deep red face has recently tak-
en up residence on a table in the
ante-room of the International
Center, ready to exert a peaceful
and literary influence on campus
He is Kuan Yu, Chinese god
of war and patron of literature.
whose status was presented to
the Center by Wesley Fishel, of
Cleveland, Ohio.
The seeming contradiction i C
the thought of a war god bring-
Students Give
Varied Views
On Violence
(Continued from Page i)
Herbert Furnum, '49E, condoned
Commuxnist speakers, "but not
when they have been indicted by
the government - they should
have invited Governor Sigler!"1
Bill Cochran, '49, expressed an
opinion held by many students in
terming the Eisler mobbing "a
disgrace."
A few students, however, con-
sidered the demonstration "fun."
"I think everybody just wanted
to have a good time," George
Chaffy, '48, explained. "As a
friend of mine said, it was like
a pep rally."
Gordon Orear, '50, thought it
"a good snowball fight-we ought
to have more like them."
Most enthusiastic of all, though,
was Chip Warrick, Bus. Ad., who
said:
"It was a fine idea. I was out
there throwing eggs myself!"
Iee Sculpture
Fools Students
Students going to school early
yesteioW were shocked by the
sight 1f a half frozen figure sit-
ting on the stone bench in front
of Haven Hall.
One pretty coed, thinking that
perhaps Gerhart Eisler had been
unable to find adequate lodging
in town and had been frozen to
death during the night, started to
put in an emergency call to the
police department, but was
stopped by one of her friends who
took the time to examine the fig-
ure more closely.
IHr inspection revealed that
the cold, quiet figure was no more
than a very skillfully built snow-
man. Evidently constructed by
enterprising students during the
night, the figure remained undis-
turbed until early afternoon.
At that time, an unidentified
student, probably dissatisfied over
a delayed subsistence check or
moaning over a coming bluebook,
viciously cleaved the head from
the silent and unprotesting man-
ndutlnt.
Later, however, the damage was
repaired by a sympathetic passer-
by, and "Gerhart," as he was af-
fectionately named by his friends,
continued his lonely vigil, sitting
on the "Gift of the Class of 1901."

ing peace is explained by the
Chinese belief that their war god
urevents war and protects people
from its horrors.
Plaster and Ice
The statue is made of plaster
end covered with semi-precious
stones. It is valued at approxi-
mately $500 according to Dr. Es-
son M. Gale, director of the In-
ternational Center.
Several legends explain the fact
that Kuan Yu is always pictured
as having a deep red face. One
of the best known tells the story
of a youth called Yun-chang who
killed a local official to protect
a young girl from becoming a
concubine.
Hot Pursuit
Pursued by the guards, Yun-
chang crossed a river and knelt
on the other side to wash his face
in the water. When he rose he
discovered that his complexion
had changed to reddish gray so
that he was completely unrecog-
nizable. He then presented him-
self to the officers in safety tell-
ing them that his name was Kuan.
Later he joined with two friends
who took the oath of brotherhood
and afterward were known as the
three brothers of the peach-orch-
ard. Their exploits are known
throughout China and are told in
the "Story of the Three King-
doms," a Chinese classic.
Supporter of Heaven
Known for centuries as a mili-
taryhero, Kuan Yu was made a
god by the Emperor Wan Li of
the Ming dynasty, who in 1594
conferred upon him the title of
Faithful and Loyal Great Ti, Sup-
porter of Heaven and Protector of
the Kingdom. Thousands of tem-
ples have been erected in his
honor throughout China.
the Emperor Wan Li of the Ming
dynasty, who in 1594 conferred
upon him the.title of Faithful and
Loyal Great Ti, Supporter of
Heaven and Protector of the King-
dom. Thousands of temples have
been erected in his honor through-
out China.
As a war god Kuan Yu's por-
trait hangs in all Army tents. His
fame increased during the Man-
chu Period when it is said that he
appeared in the heavens during
a battle and brought success to
the Imperialists.
Faculty ...
(Continued from Page 1)
man of the sociology, said "For
about 15 years, no one but the
radical students were active in
political issues," Prof. Angell said.
"Now the conservative students
have come out to show their hand,
and I am glad to see that they are
at least politically active."
"I hope they will control their
methods of showing it," he said.
Prof. P. A. Throop of the his-
tory department said that the mob
action was the result of the gen-
eral tension in this country over
Russia. "A citizen of the United
States with the interests of this
country at heart has a right to
say anything," Prof. Throop said,
"but Eisler does not fall into this
category."

SPEAKER SIGNS AID BILL-Speaker Joseph W. Martin, Jr.,
(left) signs the emergency foreign aid bill in Washington, after
passage by the House. Rep. John M. Vorys, a member of the
House Foreign Affairs Committee, witnesses the signing.
GRAVE SITUATION:
Chance Turns Cemetery Site
Into Pharmacology Building

Campus
Highlights
Campus AVC . . .
The campus chapter of the
American Veterans Committee
will hold a business meeting at
7:30 p.m. today in the Union.
IArchitecture Tea ...
The student chapter of the
American Institute of Architects
Vill sponsor a Christmas Tea
for the students and faculty of
the Architecture school from
3 to 5 p.m. today.
* * *
Botany Lecture ...
Dr. Birbal Sahni, Dean of the
Faculty of Science at the Univer-
sity of Lucknow, India, will lec-
ture on "Hunting Fossils in In-
dia," at 4:15 today in the Rack-
ham Amphitheatre.
~ 4-
Bible Study .
Rev. Leonard Verduin will
lead a discussion in First Cor-
inthians at the Michigan Chris-
tian Fellowship Bible study hour
at 8 p.m. today in Lane Hall.
Union Coffee Hour . .
Members of the University
French department will be honor-
ed at the Union faculty-student
coffee hour to be held from 4 to
5 p.m. today in the Terrace Room
of the Union.
YPCM Sing . .
Barbara Cahn of People's Songs
will present a program of folk
and. other songs at the YPCM
Sing scheduled for 7:30 p.m. to-
morrow in the Union.
Migration Study
To Be Undertaken
The sociology department an-
nounced yesterday that a study of
intra-community migration in the
city of Fiint will be initiated in the
near future.
Prof. A. H. Hawley stated that
graduate students and qualified
under-graduates are invited to
participate in the project, which
will involve interviewing a sample
of 500 households to obtain data
regarding reasons for changes of
residence.
The study will be started at the
opening of spring semester, but
students are urged to contact
either Prof. Hawley or Dr. Ronald
Freedman so that final arrange-
ments can be made.

Spanish Fihn
'La Barraca'
To Be Shown
"La Barraco," Spanish film
from the novel by Vicente Blasco
-Ibanez, will be presented at 8
p.m., tonight, in Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre, under the auspices
of La Sociedad Hispanica.
"La Barraca," or "The Cabin,"
deals with the difficulties en-
countered by Spanish peasants
trying to make a living from their
Valencian farms. The hatred for
their economics status is brought
out in their treatment of one fam-
ily in their own group which they
consider as intruders.
The economic theme is not in
most of Ibanez' works, including
"Mere Nostrum," "Blood and
Sand," and "The Four Horsemen
of the Apoclypse," which was
translated into nearly every lan-
guage and made a silent film suc-
cess with Rudolph Valentino.
"La Barraca," however, is con-
sidered to be Ibanez' greatest
work. It is read in romance lan-
guage Spanish 32 courses at the
University.
Starring in the film are two
Latin American actors, Domingo
Soler and Anita Blanch.
Members of La Sociedad His-
panica will be admitted free upon
presentation of their membership
cards. Tickets will go on sale at
2 p.m., today, in the Lydia Men-
delssohn Box Office.

A DEFENSIVE ROLE:
Russian Tactics Hinder U.S.
Aid to China, Lyons Asserts

"As long as Russia stands ready
to step in and dominate China,
America is helpless to aid China,
said Bayard Lyon of the Oriental
Languages department, speaking
at a Chinese supper at the Inter-
national Center.
Speaking on "What Can Amer-
ica Do for China?" Lyon assert-
ed that "America, the world's
strongest nation, is today com-
pletely hamstrung on all fronts by
a far weaker nation. Her power
for good is held immobilized like
a horse tied to a hitching post.
Wake Up America
The horse could easily break
away, if he only knew his own
strength. America could easily
rescue ensla yed nations if she only
AICAF To Hold
Education Drive
The Executive Committee of the
Michigan Committee for Aca-
demic Freedom voted at its last
meeting to carry out an educa-
tional campaign to acquaint stu-
dents with the National Students
Association's Student Bill of
Rights.
The campaign will be carried
out by the local Academic Free-
dom Committees, in conjunction,
if possible with the various Stu-
dent Legislatures.

could wake up to her own
strength, Lyon added.
Russia's aggressive tactics are
not merely bad manners, but they
are cleverly designed to keep the
American people mentally on the
defensive so that we won't feel
our own strength, he added.
"Meanwhile, unconscious of the
opportunity and responsibility
which go hand in hand with great
strength, America sits bound hand
and foot by cords of Russia's
-weaving, and remains an unhappy
accessory to Russia's many
crimes," he asserted.
The problem of aid to China
and other needy countries can be
solved only through settling ac-
counts with Russia, he said.
Endless Crimes
"I hope my American people
will some day soon wake up and
tell Russia: 'We are sick and tired
of your endless crimes. We insist
thattyou get out of all occupied
territories, or we will take the
necessary steps to force you out,"
Lyon said.
"I pray that the day will come
when America will assume her
rightful role of world leadership,
so that the millions of oppressed,
enslaved peoples of the world can
again breathe freely and live
happy, useful lives in a peaceful
world with all the freedoms whict
mean so much to them," he cor-
eluded.

i

I

Had things turned out differ-'
ently, the ground on which the
Pharmacology Building is located
would be a cemetery and the
monument which now is located'
beside the library would mark the
graves of past professors lying
near the scene of their academick
careers.
The monument, distinguished.'
by its column that appears to be
cut off about fifteen feet from
the ground, was originally de-1
signed to perpetuate the graves
of Professors Whiting, Fox and
Denton, and the memory of Prof.
Douglas Houghton.
Latin Inscription
Inscribed in Latin, the monu-
ment was first erected on the
proposed University Bur'ying
Ground, set up by the Regents
in 1845.
The Professor's Monument, af-
ter the graveyard project was
abandoned almost circumnavi-
gated the campus. It was moved
six times all around the diag until,
UWF Discuss
Atom Control
Our state department is chas-
ing a "will-o-the-wisp of UN
power" in its attempt to establish
internationol control of atomic
energy, the campus chapter of the
United World Federalists agreed
last night.
"Control of atomic energy and
control of war itself cannot beI
separated and are only possible
under a world government with
power to enforce law," George
Shepherd, president of the chap-
ter, said.

in. 1918 it reached its present po-
sition beside the library.
No one knows for sure, but it
is doubted if any deceased profes-
sors are buried on campus at the
present time.
Humorous Potentialities
The humorous potentialities of
having dead professors within a
stoner's throw of the class rooms
are too numerous to mention.
Library Program
Colton Storm, curator of manu-
scripts and maps at the Clements
Library, will present a program
entitled "Be a Friend to Your Li-
brary" at 2:30 p.m. today over
WKAR, through Broadcasting
Service facilities.
Carl Sheppard, Jr., instructor
in fine arts, will discuss "Abstract
Art and Industrial Design" on the
weekly modern painting series
program at 4 p.m., today over
WPAG.

MORE CHRISTMAS
GIFT SUGGESTIONS ON
lRCA VICTORi
RECORDS
FROM ALBUMS RECENTLY RECEIVED

CHRISTMAS CAROLS OF MANY LANDS
Vicnna Boy)s Choir
C 32
BEETHOVEN: Third Symphony
Boston Sympn hony under Koussevitzky
.1)M 116 1
B0CCH ERI N I: Cello Concerto
Casals andI Londona Symphony
Dl)M 381
BRAHMS; Fourth Symphony
3oston Symp'huny under Koussevitzky
D)M 730( ..). . . .. . .

$4.20
$7.35
$4.20
$6,30

ATTrENTION
Wise Shoppers

BRAHMS: Viola Sonata
Primrose, XVioa and Moore,
D M 422 ............

(Op. 120 No. 2 )
Piano
.$4.20

Even Santa Claus
is finding gifts at
savings up to
50%o
During Dillon s '
SMOK-E S
SALE
" Sweaters - Girdles
* Dresses Coats
" Suits-Lingerie

BRUCKNER: Mass in E Minor
Aachen Ca ihedral Choir
D M 596 .... ..............

Ho\
1 J Handsoitme Robes

'I

$7.35

CHOPIN: Etudes
Brailowsky, Piano
DM 1171 .

$9.45

HAYDN: Symphony No. 94 (Surprise)
Bston Symphony under Koussevitzky

<? :.
.,

Y
a Da
4 .
? Y / t"
.-
$ l ! .
.ic ' .Y
'
a.
,, ... I....

P'
F

DM 1155 ....................$4.20
KHATCHATURIAN:sMasquerade Suite
Boston "Po ps" Orchestra Zander Fiedler
DM 1166 .............................$3.15
AOZART: Violin Concerto No. 3
4Menuhin with Paris Orchestra under Enesco
DM 4S ................. $4,20
'ROKOFIEFF: Sonata No. 7
Vladimir Horowitz, Piano
DM 1042 .-. .$3.15
METANA: The Moldau
Czech P! ilharnmonic under Kubelik.
DM 523$....................$4.20
These arc but a few of the hundreds of RCA Victor
Abnms alwa ys in stock at t/w

...Cozy and Companionable

In Warm

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In Cozy Quilts
14.95 to 35.00

14.95 to 29.95

COMFORTABLE, attractive styles full of welcome warmth for busy
mornings or leisurely evenings. Pure wool flannels, nicely tailored

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