100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 14, 1947 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-12-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THEMICf li DAILY.

SONAY -rf 1,14

FiftyEighth Year
Edited and managed by students of the Un-
versity of Michigan under the authority of the
Board in control of Student Pubication.
John Campbell.................Managing Editor
Nancy Helmick................. Generl Manager
Clyde Recht........................City Editor
Jeanne Swendeman......... Advertising Manager
Edwin Schneider ................Finance Manager
Lida Dmiles.....................Associate Editor
Eunice Mntz..................Associate Editor
Dick Kraus .......................Sports Editor
Bob Lent................Associate Sports Editor
Joyce Johnson.................. Women's Editor
Betty Steward..........Associate Women's Editor
Joan de Carvajal................Library Director
Mevin Tick................Circulation Manager
i Telephone 23-24-1
Member of The Associated Press
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to
the use for re-publication of all news dispatches
credited to it or otherwise credited In this news-
paper. All rights of re-publication of all other
matters herein also reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor Mic-
igan, as second class mail matter.
Subscription during the regular scool year by
carrier, $5.00, by mail, $600.
Member, Assoc. Collegiate Press, 1947-48
Editorials published in The Michigan Daily
are written by members of The Daily staff
and represent the views of the writers only.
NIGHT EDITOR: FRED SCHOTT
IRA Ballot
WHEN IRA PHRASED the questions on
their 'recent ballot, they must have
been confronted with the glowing vision of
blaring headlines. With no stretch of the
imagination they probably saw them exactly
as they would read: "Election Reveals Stud-
. eats Against Barbers' TPactics"-"Opposition
to Discrimination Policy Voiced by Over-
4 whelming Majority." And that vision, natur-
ally enough, became a reality only a few
days later.
IRA knew that an "overwhelming major-
ity" of the student body would vote against
discrimination because they realized that
the University of Michigan lies north of the
Mason-Dixon Line. Secondly, they were well
sware that a majority of the students had
spent the best years of their lives fighting
against discrimination. And finally, they
were conscious of the most important fac-
tor of all, that an overwhelming majority
oT students are humanitarian enough and
intelligent enough to reject the idea of the
superiority of any race. Knowing these
things, they couldn't miss.
When news circulated that such a poll
was in the offing, it was inferred that IRA
was attempting to prove that the majority
i, of the campus backed them in their a-
tions.
What IRA's balloting actually did was
emphasize something that was already
known, and in so doing to bury one of the
major issues of the controversy.
The election revealed that the majority of
students are against the barbers' tactics,
4 but it did not disclose whether the campus
approves or disapproves of IRA's tactics.
Dissatisfaction with the wording of the
ballots and the omission of a major issue
was evidenced by the fact that approxi-
mately 1,000 students who voted for the

Student Legislature failed to fill out the
IRA questionnaires.
The survey is over; an overwhelming ma-
jority of students voted against discrimin-
ation. But as yet nobody knows with what
tactics students prefer to eliminate this
discrimination.
-George L. Walker
CINEMA
AT LYDIA MENDELSSOHN, with Peter
Lorre.
IN THE GERMAN classic at Lydia Mendels-
sohn this week, Peter Lorre is up to no
good, as usual. Except for this similarity,
however, there is nothing in his performance
to remind you of the stereotyped roles you've
been seeing him in for the last 10 years or
so. In this earlier film, he has the unenviable
task of portraying a psychopatl whose pe-
culiar compulsion has led him into the mur-
der, at one time or another, of nine young
girls. This is obviously not the sort of be-
havior that arouses the kindlier emotions,
but Mr. Lorre carries his assignment off with
such skill that you'll probably catch yourself
sympathizing with him before the film is
over.
Fritz Lang has received a generous amount
of praise for directing this production, and
there's no doubt but what he deserves it. He
' has handled his theme adroitly and with
thorough detachment. In one scene, for in-

Il~~~~s l ap-~'nro es

fHE EISLER CONT.OV F1?YGs brought
out one important. puint.: it; about tlime
the University cri s i) it ( l Lati, ju 5on
speakers and p01111(81 ;ronp
No s( of ruibS Veninl aecepiable
speakers for campus a ppairnees are avail-
able to the student body. Ti p Ei.-Jr ban oh-
viously means that the Uive-sit holds to
itself discretionary power .o ,1ay speakers.
But it has certainly failed to make known
what limits th'e r' i 10othis ower, and on
what basis it deth, - nincs vi vo -)an be heard
cn campus.
If mox-e de'fiinit rules had lben avail-
able, the Eisler controversy would never
have occurred. No special ?onferen e of
University offii.als would have bee i need-
ld, and the situdent sposors would have
been perfectly aware whether Eisler and
Marzani could speak on c!mpus.
Rules must state whether poIiticai speech-
e, can be made on campus, whether repre-
sentatives of nationai parties may address
the stude(.., sal wi at characi er back-
ground is necessary for eligibility to speak.
A n tc r important tmission in Univer-
sity regulations i., a deniAon of the cri-
teria used in gri-anting recognition to stud-
ent political organizations.
MYDA's recognition was withdrawn be-
cause it refused to separate from its national
parent, AYD. SDA was approved as a localI
group, not yet affiliated with the national
ADA. YPCM was granted approval in the
same manner.
Th se decisiOns sem to impO y that ionly
local p (li ' wall'roups w3il receiVe Ui'niver-
sity iec 8ratio. hut hO one is iuite sure.
S ou f aroup:; cani : easare their chances
for approval only by what is a growing
body of precedent.
If future controversy is to be avoided, the
University must make its stand clear in well
defined rules, and must make these rules
readily available to all students.
--larrielt Friedman

tHAT IS TIlE crucial issue in the Uni-
versity's refusal to allow Gerhard Eis-
ler and Carl Marzani to speak on campus?
It is not a question of MYDA's alleged at-
tempt to "engineer" a "publicity scheme."
Nor is it a question of the personal merits
of Eisler or Marzani.
The real issue is whether American
students have the right to hear, compare
and judge the truth of competing views
in any moral, social, political or economic
controversy no matter how extreme or un-
conventional.-
In a democracy, the chief function of a
university is to present for student consid-
eration all interpretations of the truth, and
to encourage the efforts of students to
secure any information beyond what the
university itself transmits.
By its action yesterday, the University has
demonstrated that it is weak and hypo-
critical. Confronted with a situation that de-
manded moral courage and intellectual in-
tegrity, the University bowed its head in
surrender to the onslaught of J. Parnell
Thomas' House un - American Activities
Committee and confessed that its devotion
to the Bill of Rights is mere lip-service.
By its action, the University denied its
belief in the principle that democracy can
only flourish in an environment where
the competition of ideas is free and un-
restricted.
By its action, the University proved that
ii lacks faith in the capacity of its students
to discern between truth and untruth, be-
tween what is in the best interests of a free
and creative society and what is detriment-
al to it.
By its action, the University made a mock-
ery of academic freedom.
-Joe Frein

1 {J FIRST SEM(Zt JE S TEUR
- College of 16rature, S'ienee -nd ithe Arrt
College of Pharmacy
School of Business Administration
School of Education
School of Forestry and Conservation
School of Music
School of Public Health
JANUARY 19-30, 1948
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the time
of exercise is the time of the first lecture period of the week; for
courses having quizzes only, the time of exercise is the time of
the first quiz period. Certain courses will be examined at special
periods as noted below the regular schedule. 12 oclock classes,
5 o'clock classes, and other "irregular" ciasses may use any of the
periods marked * provided there is no conflict. To avoid misun-
derstandings and errors, each student should receive notification
from his instructor of the time and place of his examination. In
the College of Literature, Science and the Arts, no date of exam-
ination may be changed without the consent of the Examination
Committee.

DAILY
OFF ICIL1
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)

son,
17.

Secretary, by 12 noon, Dec.

Time of Exercise

Time of Examination

Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday<
Monday
Monday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Evening

at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at

8
9
10
11
1
2
3
4
8
9
10
11
1
2
3
4

........................W ed ., ,
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .F r i.,
............... M on.,
........................M on ., ,
.........................Wed.,
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .S a t., ,
........... Thurs.,
... ... ...F ri.
.......................T hurs.,
... ....... Sat.,
. .......... . T ues.,
.Tues.'
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .F ri.,
.Thurs.,
................... M on.,
......................,..W ed.,

January
January:
January
January
January
January
January
January
January
January
January
January
January
January
January
January
January

21,
23,
26,
19,
28,
24,
29.
30,
22,
24,
27,
20,
30,
29,
19,
21,
21,

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5

Classes ...................... W ed.,

SPECIAL PERIODS

Economics 101 )
English 1, 2, 106, 107 ) .. .
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 31, 32, )
61, 62, 91, 92, 153 ) ...

....Mon., January 19, 2- 5
..."Tues., January 20, 2- 5

MATTER OF FACT:
Catutof the g

By STEWART ALSOP
HENRY A. WALLACE has let the cat (ex-
cept possibly for the tip of its tail) out
of the bag. He has stated flatly this week
that there will be a third party in 1948, un-
less the Administration unexpectedly adopts
the Wallace formula for abandoning most
of the world to the Comintern. He has stated
further that he will support this party. He
has been coy about whether he will head the
ticket, but this coyness was wholly unneces-
sary, since he is the only possible candidate.
What this amounts to, of course, is that, bar
a miracle, Wallace will run, as predicted in
this space for more than a year. Since Sena-
tor Claude Pepper has cautiously ducked the
No. 2 spot on the Wallace ticket, the egregi-
ous Senator Glen Taylor is probably cast for
the role of Sancho Panza to Wallace's Don
Quixote.
All this must please Mr. William Z. Fos-
ter, Communist party chief, whose cohorts,
as has also been documented in this space,
are the real brain trusters of the third party
movement.
As Foster and his party strategists
knew, the creation of their third party will
have two entirely foreseeable results. It
will make the nomination and election of
a right-wing Republicap far more pro-
bable, since it will certainly drain off
moderate Republican and Democratic
support. It will also cause the Communists
to be isolated and enfeebled still further in
their main stronghold in the labor move-
ment, the C.I.O. .
Family Man?
CAN'T THE MAN with the eye-brows find
a place to go?
With an exquisitely terse message, John
L Lewis and his United Mine Workers-pull-
ed out of the AFL late Friday, a logical step
after his thorough rebuff by the AFL exe-
cutive council at the Union's San Francisco
conference in October, and his third "dis-
affiliation" since 1935.
But the UMW "labor baron" doesn't
seem to be able to stick with anybody for
very long. In 1935, Lewis first became "dis-
affiliated" from tIe AFL, after organizing
a committee for industrial organization-
which grew un to be today's Congress of
Industrial Organizations. Lewis and his
baby CIO were expelled for setting up a
"rival organization."
"Baby" grew up fast, and when Lewis and
his co-workers split over support of the late
President Roosevelt's third term, Lewis laid
down an ultimatum--"If Roosevelt wins, I
quit (as CI) president)."
He did.
Two years later he withdrew completely.
So John L. took his faithful UMW back
home to the AFL, and promnptly found-and
Friday publicized-that he just isn't a fam-
ily man.
-Naomi Stern
- OBERT M. HUTCHINS, Chancellor of
the University of Chicago, has publicly
announced that he can no longer in good
conscience advise faculty members and
gridutes t no in tog overnment service.

A vast sea change has already taken place
almost unnoticed in the C.I.O., particularly
since Walter Reuther's smashing victory in
the automobile workers' convention. Except
for those unions like the electrical workers
still tightly gripped by the Communist ma-
chine, the entire C.I.O. has now vigorously
shaken the Communists loose.
The two most significant of these out-
breaks have been in Wisconsin and in
Minnesota. The Communist hold in Wis-
consin's C.I.O., which only last year was
strong enough to contribute heavily to the
defeat of one of labor's ablest friends,
Robert LaFollette, is now completely brok-
en. Working through the electrical work-
ers, the Communists brought their biggest
guns (including Clarence Hathaway, for-
mer "Daily Worker" editor) to bear on
Minnesota, in an effort to commit the
state C.I.O. to a third party. At the con-
vention, they were roundly and unexpect-
edly trounced.
All this boiling down below has been re-
flected in national C.I.O. headquarters. C.I.O.
president Philip Murray, who was once cust-
omarily referred to in 'The Daily Worker"
as "our great leader," has now caused that
journal's editors to cry out in pain and rage.
He not only sent James B. Carey, C.I.O. sec-
retary-treasurer, to Paris to defend the Mar-
shall plan but he has himself indorsed the
plan in a broadcast for the State Depart-
ment's Voice of America.
It is now virtually certain that the C.I.O.
leadership will actively support the Demo-
cratic party and President Harry Truman
in 1948, unless Truman manages to Put a
remarkably big foot in his mouth before
that time.
This in turn will mean that the United
Electrical Workers, and the other smaller
Communist-run C.I.O. unions, will be
forced to defy official C.I.O. policy. For
they take their orders not from Murray
but from Foster. Thus there has already
been speculation at C.I.O. headquarters
that in 1948 the Communist-run unions
may be faced with the flat alternatives of
getting rid of their Communist leader-
ship or of expulsion from the C.I.O. In
short, the third party issue may cause the
Communists to lose their last toehold in
the American labor movement.
Thus the real objective of the third party
backers (including William Z. Foster) is
unveiled. It is the election of a right-wing,
isolationist Republican in 1948. It is based
squarely on the assumption that the curi-
ous pinch-penny nostalgia for a simpler and
less expensive past which afflicts so much
right-wing thinking would reduce American
foreign policy to mere sound and fury, sig-
nifying nothing. This is not an entirely fat-
uous assumption, as the debates in the House
of Representatives, where the conservative
Republican leadership has fought to cut
the gizzard out of the interim aid bill, clearly
signify.
(Copyright, 1947, New York Herald Tribune)
HOLLYWOOD HANDLED the theme of
loyalty the way it has handled most
great themes-by avoiding it, by disregard-

Speech 31, 32
Soc. 51, 54, 62, 90 ..........
German 1, 2, 31, 32, 35
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32
Psychology 31
Chemistry 1, 3, 4, 5E, 6, 7
Hist. 11, Lee. Section II
Ec. 51, 52, 53, 54
Botany 1
Zoology 1

)
..........*Wed., January 21, 2- 5
)
.*Thurs., January 22, 2- 5
)
)......... *Fri., January 23, 2- 5

)
) .. .. ..'Mon., January

2
26, 2- 5

)
. Tues., January 27, 2- 5

Pol. Sci. 1, 2 .......

. 'Wed~, January 28, 2- 5

School of Business Administration
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
School of Forestry and Conservation
Courses not covered by' this schedule as well as any neces-
sary changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
School of Music:

Application for Admission to
the Graduate School for the Sec-
ond. Semester: Students in other
schools and colleges who will
graduate, and who may wish to
enter the Graduate School the
second semester, must submit
their applications for admission q
by December 15 in order to be
given consideration.
Bureau of Appointments: Thereh
is a vacancy for an instructor a
(Negro) in Geography, at Miner d
Teachers College, Washington,
D.C. For further information call v
at the Bureau of Appointments, s
201 Mason Hall. '
Bureau of Appointments and t
Occupational Information, 201 v
Mason Hall.h
Michigan Bell Telephone Com-
pany will be here to interview
men graduating in February forr
non-technical jobs in the com-
mercial, business, and traffic de-
partments on Tuesday, Dec. 16. t
Immediate Opening for Edito-t
rial Assistant: We have a call for t
a young lady who has had edi-c
torial experience and who is ae
good typist to work on a profes-
sional journal, in the vicinity ofs
Ann Arbor. Salary is good.7
For complete information calla
the Bureau, Ext. 371.
Lecture2
Business Administration Lee-r
ture: Mr. Daniel F. Gerber, Presi-c
dent of the Gerber Products Com-r
pany, Fremont, Michigan, will dis-s
cuss the annual statement for t
stockholders and employees at 4
p.m., Tues., Dec. 16, Rackham
Amphitheatre. The public is in- -
vited
Academic Notices
Doctoral Examination for Sam-
uel Joseph Fauman, Sociology;r
thesis: "The Factors in Occupa-I
tional Selection Among Detroit1
Jews," 2 p.m., Mon., Dec. 15, West
Council Room, Rackham Bldg.I
Chairman, A. H. Hawley.
Doctoral Examination for Wil-I
liam Charles Parkinson, Physics;1
thesis: "An Investigation of Meth-
ods for Measuring Absorption Co-1
efficients of Gamma Rays," 2 p.m.,
Mon., Dec. 15, East Council Room,1
Rackham Bldg. H. R. Crane,I
Chairman.1
Doctoral Examination for Wil-
lam Robert Martin, Zoology;
thesis: "The Mechanics of En-
vironmental Control of Body
Form in Fishes," 2:30 p.m., Mon.,
Dec. 15, Rm. 3091, Natural Sci-
ence - Bldg. Chairman, R. M.
Bailey.
Doctoral Examination for Leon
Madansky, Physics; thesis: "TheI
Measurement of Lifetimes of
Short-lived Metastable States in
Nuclei," 1:30 p.m., Tues., Dec. 16,
West Council Room, Rakham
Bldg. Chairman: M. L. Weiden-
beck.
Mathematics Colloquium: First
meeting, Tues., Dec. 16, 4 p.m.,
Rm. 3201 Angell Hall. Paper: by
George Piranian, "Toeplitz Trans-
formation with Small Converg-
ence Fields." Hectographed ab-
stracts are available in Miss Kel-
ly's and Miss Eastman's offices.
Orientation Seminar: Mon.,
Dec. 15, 7 p.m., Rm. 3001, Angell
Hall. Mr. Curtis will give the con-
clusion of his talk on "The Haus-
dorff Paradox."
Psychology 87 Laboratory: Lab-
oratory examination, 5 to 6 p.m.,
Thurs., Dec. 18. A through L, 231
Angell Hall. M through Z, 25 An-
gell Hall.

Zoology Seminar: Thurs., Dec.
18, 7:30 p.m., Rackham Amphi-
theater. Mr. William A. Martin
will speak on "The Mechanics of
Environmental Control of Body
Form in Fishes."
Chemistry Colloquium: 4 : 15
p.m., Rm. 303 Chemistry Bldg. Dr.
Richard B. Hahn of Wayne Uni-
versity will discuss his work on
Zirconium Chemistry.
Concerts
Christmas Concerts: The Uni-
versity Musical Society will pre-
sent Handel's "Messiah" at 2:30
p.m., Sunday, Dec. 14, Hill Audi-:
torium.
The public is urged to come suf-
ficiently early as to be seated on
time, since the doors will be
closed. The Sunday performance,
which is broadcast, will begin
promptly at 2:30.
The following will participate:

TO THE EDITOR
EDITOR'S NOTE: Because The Daily
prints every letter to the editor re-
ceived (which is signed, 300 words
or less in length, and in good taste)
we remind our readers that the views
expressed in letters are those of the
writers only. Letters of more than
300 words are shortened, printed or
omitted at the discretion of the edi-
torial director.
Subsistence
To the Editor:
DESPITE THE fact we are not
veterans, we read the article
headed, Survey Shows Vet Allow-
nce is Insufficient," with consi-
lerable interest.
The AVC has been a leading
veteran's organization for pres-
urizing wise legislation. If we
ecall correctly, they are on record
as favoring the combating infla-
ion. Last year they opposed (as
nflationary) state servicemen's
houses.
Now they have come out for
raising subsistance for those un-
der the G. 1. Bill. Whether or not
the government should cover all
the expenses of the veteran at-
tending college we do not propose
to argue here. At present we are
concerned with the aforemention-
ed article in Friday's daily.
The results of "Operation Sub-
sistence" strike us as a bit wierd.
To wit: Single veterans spent an
average of $140 per month, an
increase of over 40% from last
year, married veterans spent $203,
20% over last year, and married
vets with children spent $167,
roughly 18% over last year. Para-
doxically enough, both years the
married vets without children
spent considerable more than
those with children-the discrep-
ancy being greater this year!
Think about this difference. Can
it be presented as positive evilence
for increased subsistence?
We do not know how represent-
ative these figures are within each
group, and we would venture
guess that Mr. Antonofsky could
not be too sure either. We only
know that if the AVC decided to
lobby in Congress for increased
subsistence, they'd probably be
better off leaving these figures in
Ann Arbor. There is plenty of
prima facie evidence for increased
living costs and their effects on
the Vet as well as on everybody
else. While you're in Congress,
boys, how about exerting a litte
pressure to keep prices down so
that you won't have to be making
monthly pilgrimages to Washing-
ton to increase subsistence.
Gloria Miller
Marilyn Hendricks
Film Writers
To the editor:
Would you please ask Miss!
Jean Fagan to explain her source
of information for the statement '
in Friday's editorial that the Hol-
lywood writers were fired because
theykwere authors of a movie
attacking race hatred?
- - -Paul Kircher
Caution
To the Editor:
AM APPRECIATIVE of Prof.
Paton's point in recent letter
that many critics are partcular-
istic to the point of blaming +

"everything" bad on GOP politi-
cos. However, I note his inference
that groups other than the GOP
"... have had full control of the
helm for about fifteen years ..."
I submit that caution is equally
valuable for both Prof. Paton and
Mr. Frein who wrote-the editorial
question.
Likewise, Prof. Paton's remarks
linking Mr. Frein with "brother
Molotov" are difficult to credit,
upon carefully perusing said edi-
torial by the latter. Here, Prof.
Paton seems to travel a path from
a small particular point of simi-
larity to a broad general conclu-
sion. One is reminded of current
pratice of Soviet press of calling
USA "fascist" every time we blink.
If, by criticizing GOP for its pro-
minent role in dropping Price
Control, Mr. Frein is " . . .doing
his little bit to bring about, the
'planned Chaos' that his apparent
friends are . . .promoting abroad
. ," then it follows that Prof.
Paton is a Stalinist, nay, a Super-
Trozkyite in the field of ac-
c ounting and one can be grate-
ful that there are no Un-Ameri
can Accounting Investigation
Committees, to smear him or
throw him in jail because of his
espousal of new ideas.
The brilliant insight and ob-
jectivity that Prof. Paton uses
so effectively in his professional
work would go far for him in
understanding current political
and economic affairs. Those who

Individual Instruction in Applied Music.
Individual examinations by appointment will be given
all applied music courses (individual instruction) elected
credit in any unit of the University. For time and place of
aminations, see bulletin board at the School of Music.

for
for
ex-

School of Public Health
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any neces-
sary changes will be indicated on the School -bulletin board.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
January 19 to January 30, 1948
NOTE: For courses having both lecture and quizzes, the time
of class is the time of the first lecture period of the week; for
courses having quizzes only, the time of class is the time of the
first quiz period.
Drawing and laboratory work may be continued through
the examination period in amount equal to that normally de-
voted to such work during one week.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted
below the regular schedule. All cases of conflicts between
assigned examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See bulletin board outside of Room 3036 East Engineering Build-
ing between January 5 and January 10 for instruction. To avoid
misunderstandings and errors each student should receive notifi-
cation from his instructor of the time and place of his appear-
ance in each course during the period January 19 to January 30.
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classification Committee.

Time of Exercise

Time of Examination

(at
(at
(at

8..,
10...

. Wednesday,
.......Friday,
.... Monday,

January
January
January

21,
23,
26,

Monday

(at 11....... Monday, January 19
(at 1... Wednesday, January 28,
(at 2..,... Saturday, January 24,
(at 3..... Thursday, January 29,
(at 4........ Friday, January 30,

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5

(at
(at
(at

8.
9.
10.

Thursday,
Saturday,
Tuesday,

January
January
January

Tuesday

(at 11....... Tuesday, January
(at 1........ Friday, January

22,
24,
27,
20,
30,
29,
19,
21,

(at
(at
(at

2..... Thursday,
3...... Monday,
4... Wednesday,

January
January
January

SPECIAL PERIODS
...............M onday,

Eng. 11; C.E. 21, 121.

I

January 19, 2- 5

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan