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December 11, 1947 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-12-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.pTRURSDA,-DECEMBER 1-447
ICE CREAMING
Pucksters Seek Revenge
For Previous Drubbings

nn E 4ICH~~Dct

r

By B. S. BROWN
Vic Heyliger's hockey aces will
S.e facing two teams this year
which have been the nemesis of
q chigan ice squads in all past
cotests.
Yale University met the Wol-
verines three times in 1930 and
once in 1940 and it ended the four
game series with a perfect slate,
Swinning 7-1, 1-0, 8-2 and 5-2.
The Eli sextet will journey to
Ann Arbor in February in an at-
tempt to keep its record un-
blemished. A pair of contests will
be played at that time.
Toronto Victorious
The skaters of the University of'
Toronto have also kept the Wol-
verines from victory in the nine
matches between the two schools.
There were games in 1937, 1938,
ard 1939, and in 1946, when Mich-
igan had its most successful sea-
son, four contests were played.
The Canadians won that year by
scores of 9-3, 7-5, 6-1 and 4-0.
SLast year saw the Wolverines bow
6- yand 4-2. There have been no
ties in the series thus far.
$eneitGame
Meeting first in Chicago next
week for the benefit of charity,
the Maize and Blue will attempt
to bring to an end Toronto's ice

supremacy. The second game of
the two-game series will be played
in Ann Arbor's Coliseum on De-
cember 19.
Two other teams, Colorado Col-
lege and the University of Minne-
sota, hold the edge of the Wolver-
ine puck teams in past perform-
ances. Colorado has won six
games, tied one and lost three.
The Gophers have been some-
what better, having lost only 24,
contests while copping 57. There
have been nine ties.
Heyliger's veteran squad will
face-off against Colorado in a pair
of games and will meet Minnesota
on four occasions this season. The
winner of the best out of the four
matches with the Gophers will be
named the mythical Big Nine
champ.,
Spitfires Here
Another Canadian opponent,
the Windsor Spitfires, invades
Ann Arbor tomorrow night for the
second Michigan game this year.
The visitors are members of the
International Amateur Hockey
League.
Two otner schools, the Univer-
fity of North Dakota and the Uni-
versity of California, will send
hock,-y teams to Ann Arbor for
the first time in their history to
face the Wolverines.
The Dakotans will play here
twice in'the early part of January,
and the Bears will meet Michigan
in a single game in the latter part
of the season.

Track Team
Starts Early
Warm- Ups
Cinders are flying again in Yost
Field House, as the1948 edition of
the Michigan track team limbers
up for the pre-Christmas season,
and begins to store up condition-
ing for the long Varsity year
ahead.
Haste may well make waste, but
Coach Ken Doherty is whipping
the lads around with thoughts of
some fine times in the inner-
squad meet on the 19th. Last
year's showing was phenomenal
so some doings is necessary. And
there is one more consideration.
When the football team starts
its workouts for the R-ose Bowl,
one end of the Field House is
going to be made into a Ser-
bonian Bog. This is a touch of
realism. At any event, it will be
a precarious occupation for
thinclads to come whizzing
about. On the one hand they
may beetle into some. behemoth
full clad in his 15 pounds of pro-
tection. On the other, they may
suddenly sink from view in;the1
fen.

'Rule

Changes

i
f
i
I
t

Conference Teams To
Proposed Court Revisions

By BEV BVSSEY
Several permanent changes in
the rules book will be noted when
the Wolverines open their basket-
ball season against Western Mich-
igan this Saturday.
In addition, the Big Nine will be-
come the testing grounds for two
amendments being contemplated
by the National Collegiate Rules
Committee. If they are considered
advantageous to the game, they
will probably be adopted next year,
and if not, they will be discarded.
Temporary Rules' Change
1. Coaches will be allowed to talk
to their floor players while time is
out.
Under this rule, the players
would be able to go over to the
bench to discuss their faults
thus far in the game and to get
the coach's advice on what to do
next. According to Michigan
mentor, Ozzie Cowles, this
change would cause play to be
directed mostly from the bench,
while detracting initiative and
thought from the cagers in the
game.
2. All jump balls will take place in
either the middle or two free

Made

for

place where contact was made
when the whistle blew. If there is
any doubt about the distance to
the nearest circle, the ball will be
thrown up in the center ring.
This proposed change would
facilitate greater freedom for
those jumping. Previously, team
members crowded in clcser than
the six feet allotted as the ra-
dius of the old imaginary cir-
cle.
Permanent Changes
1. With three minutes left to play
at the end of the game the clock
will be stopped whenever the whis-
tle is blown and the ball is dead.
During regulation play, the clock
will continue going on out-of-
beunds plays, jump balls, etc.
This rule was made to prevent
the team in the lead from stall-
ing, while time ran out.
2. After a time out, the clock does
not start until the ball being
thrown in from side court is
touched by a member on either
team.
3. On a jump ball, an opponent
has the right to sandwich in be-
tween adjacent teammates, the
one jumping for the ball and the

iiiarly Start Set Sickels
Towards Grid Greatness
By PRESS HOLMES ship the other two years I played
Psychologists have been argu- here," he says, "and now that
ing for decades that the way an we've made it this year-and the
individual performs in later life Rose Bowl-it's great."
is greatly dependent upon habits
Wins Honors
formed, and behavior of that per-
son during his early years. Playing on such a star-studded
Here's some more proof! Quen- team hasn't kept him from haul-
Hr'u n- down a few more honors. He

throw throw circles, instead of the member waiting for the tap.
WAY BACK WHEN:
'yostmen' Stopped Stanford
In Rose Bowl Predecessor

-1911

1111

III

By IRWIN ZUCKER
Nearly 46 years ago a stalwart
band of Michigan gridders made
dramatic history in the first New
Year's Day Rose Bowl classic when
they inaugurated a post-season
game that was to go on down the
years as the "Daddy of them All."
Technically speaking, however,
the 1902 battle with Stanford on
the famed and honored grid at
Pasadena was not then known
as the Rose Bowl. It was called,
"Tournament of Roses Associa-
tion Game."
This whole idea of a post-
season tilt was fostered pri-
marily by a group of California
real estate dealers who felt that
a New Year's Day grid battle
would attract tourists to the
Golden West.
So, upon invitation, the first of
Fielding H. Yost's fabulous point-
a-minute teams departed one
wintry December day from Ann
Arbor. fully prepared for a 16-day
overland route to the Pacific
Coast. They brought back an im-
pressive 49-0 victory over a high-
ly-rated Stanford eleven.
The annual classic was
dropped until 1916 when Wash-
ington State and Brown re-
vived it.
One reason for the 14-year
discontinuance was the rise in
popularity of chariot and mo-
torcycle racing which was fea-
tured each year at Pasadena.
Since 1916, however, the famed
series of East-West pigskin games
has remained unbroken.
In 1918, the series was dominat-
ed by a patriotic note, with uni-
formed men and nurses in the pa-
rade, and the games that year
and the following season were
played by service teams.
It wasn't until Jan. 1, 1923,
when Southern California spanked
Penn State, 14-3, that the annual
post-season event was officially
changed from "Tournament of
THE "SMASRT"HIRT
FOR COL LEGE MIEN
SHIRTS34
These shirt beauties by Jayson
ore soft, smooth...,in the

Roses Association Game" to the
"Rose Bowl."
The idea of roses as the theme
of celebration was the inspira-
tion of one of the founders of
the Tournament of Roses Asso-
ciation, Charles F. Holder, who
was impressed with the famous
annual floral fetes at Nice.
Rose Bowl battles have not al-
ways been waged at Pasadena. Due
to war-time transportation diffi-
culties, the 1942 game was trans-
ferred to Durham, N.C. where
Oregon State defeated the home
Duke eleven, 20-16.
Liijaek To PlayI
On East Squad
SAN FRANCISCO, Dec. 10--UP)
-Two colorful backfield aces -
Johnny Lujack of Notre Dame
and Herman Wedemeyer of St.
Mary's--will face each other New
Year's Day in the annual Shrine
East-West football game.1
The game's promoters an-
nounced today that Wedemeyer
had accepted an invitation to play'
on the West team. Lujack, All-
America back, accepted a bid to
the East squad after the Notre
Dame-Southern Cal game last
Saturday.
e .

tin Sickels' father was athletic di-
rector and coach at the junior
high school Quent attended in
Benton Harbor. With the incen-
tive instilled in him by his father,
Quent naturally included athletics
in his activities, and was an out-
standing performer in Junior
high.
Spectacular Tackle
With a firm foundation for his
football career already behind him
as he entered high school, Quent
followed up with three spectacular
years at tackle. Superb on de-
fense, he consistently stopped ball
carriers all over the field.
In his senior year in 1943, his
team won the championship, and
he received All-City and All Con-
ference awards.
In June of 1944 the ubiquitous
Mr. Sickels came to Michigan.
That fall, under the war-time rul-
ing allowing freshman to play,
even though he was moved over to
the guard slot it had no injurious
effect, and he played a full season.
Besides winning his "M" he re-
ceived a 2nd team All-Big Nine
berth.
Sweet Victory
It was during this season that
Quent experienced his "second
greatest" thrill in the game of
football. His brother, Duane, was
playing on Northwestern's eleven
that year, and now Quent is for-
ever reminding his brother of the
score of 27-0.
A year and a half stretch in the
Coast Guard put a gap in his foot-
ball biography, but he returned to
don the Maize and Blue again last
fall.
This year he is enjoying the
"greatest" experience of his long
football history. "We've come so
close to winning the champion-
I-M ]NEWS
The wrestling finals of the
inter-fraternity and Residence
Hall divisions will be staged
tonight at 7:30 in the gym of
the I-M building. Thirty-two
men will compete for class hon-
ors in the sixteen matches
scheduled for each division.
* * *
A meeting of all Independent
basketball managers has been
scheduled for this afternoon at
4:30 in the I-M sports building.
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the Swedish American Line offers six trips
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Three groups of contestants judged separately:

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Contest closes April 1, 1948. Write today for complete
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