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November 27, 1947 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-11-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER I7, 147

THE ',MWHIPA N DAILY

. . ........ . ... .. . ...... . ......... . .. . ...................

M'

Hailed

as

Nation's

Top

Passing,

Wrestlers Fall
Behind in'47
Practice Pace
From the tone of Coach Clif t
Keen's voice the wrestling picture
doesn't appear too bright for the
Michigan team.
"The boys are way behind
-hedule in physical ftness and
Ij olishing up their wrestling
skill," according to the Wolver-
ine coach.
Since Keen was busy with the
150-pound football chores, there
was no strict supervision over the
matmen's opening practice ses-
sions.
As a result, they are just be-
ginning to put some concerted
effort into their work-outs. A
short period may even be held
today if the, wrestlers heed that
"worried" attitude of their boss.
The Wolverine grapplers will be
under the reins of assistant men-
tor "Butch" Jordan for two days
next week while Keen is attend-
ing a session of the National
Wrestling Committee to discuss
plans for sending sixteen mem-
bers to the Olympics in June. One
man and an alternate in each
weight division will represent the
United States.
In the past 98 percent have been
college wrestlers. Michigan holds
the distinction of having placed
the most men at one time, when
four Wolverines competed in 1928.
Ed (Don) George and Bob Hew-
itt were regulars that year.

Wolverine Backs Spark
Big Nine IndividualPlay
Bob Chappuis Leads 'Total Offense' Again;
Weisenburger, Elliott, Derricotte Honored
Led by the brilliant Bob Chap-punt. averaging 25.1 yards every
puis, who made his final season time he handled one.
one of the most brilliant in mod- tie';anldoe

kern Western Conference history,I
Michigan's champion Wolverinesj
monopolized the Big Nine's indi-
vidual honors in 1947, official
Conference atstistics disclosed yes-
terday.
The final figure for Conference
games show Chappuis as the new
passing king as well as the "total
offense" champion for the second
straight .year while his teammate,
fullback Jack Weisenburger, cap-
tured the rushing championship by
a whisker-thin margin over Pur-
due's Harry Szulborski, who led
most of the season until last Sat-
urday's final game.
All This and Elliott, Too
Another prominent member of
Michigan's offensive backfield,
Bump Elliott, captured the scor-
ing championship with 36 points.
He also was the top pass receiver
with 14 catches for 303 yards and
two touchdowns compared to the !
defending champion, end Lou Mi-
hajlovich of Indiana, who finished
second with 13 catches for 171
yards and one touchdown.
Gene' Derricotte, another of
Michigan's backfield brigade, was
the most dangerous man with al

Not All Michi-an
Breaking the Michigan monop-
oly was Dean Sensanbaugher of
Dhio State, the top kickoff return
artist; Tom Worthington, North-
western halfback who majors in
speech, the leading pass inter-j
ceptor and Pete Perini of Ohio
State as the top punter. Perini
tied with Earl Girard of Wisconsin
with an average of 38.9 per punt
but took the title on the basis of
a greater number of punts.
However, Chappuis was the
standout. While Perry Moss of Il-
linois was: completing only eight
out of 21 throws against North-
western for 70 yards, Chappuis hit
12 out of 26 for 217 yards against
Ohio State Saturday to finish the
season as the top hurler with these
'totals: 39 completions in 71 at-
tempts for 655 yards, a .549 aver-
age and seven touchdowns.
Masterful Hurler
A master of the long throw,
Chappuis' yardage was the best
since 1942 when Otto Graham of
Northwestern connected on 53 out
of 104 pitches for 714 yards.
Michigan's sturdy halfback
picked up the "total offense"
crown for the second straight year.
A year ago, in seven games, Chap-
puis gained 1,039 yards by rushing
and passing for a 148.4 average per
game but this season'in six
games--he rolled up 1,019, an av-
erage of 169.8.
That mark stands as one of the
peak performances in Conference
annals, surpassing Tommy Har-
mon's mark of 1939. In that year
at Michigan, Harmon--in five
games--accounted for 838 yards
by runs and passes, an average of
167.6.
Weisenburger, Michigan's spin-
ning fullback, nosed out Szulbor-
ski for the rushing title when he
picked up 98 yards in 23 attempts
against Ohio State while Szulbor-
ski, who had been averaging 81
yards per game, was showed down
to 48 by Indiana. They ended their
seasons with a total of 503 yards
each but Weisenburger captured
the title on the 'basis of at 6.1-
.yards-per-rush average to Szul-
borski's 5.8.

Jur -K#_rPrzuN4
By DICK KRAUS
Daily Sports Editor
COMES NOW the deluge. From here on in, duck, because here comes
" the All-America, the All-Conference, the All-Opponent, and other
All-Baloney selections.
This year the selectors at least waited until the season was
over. Most of tlhem, that is. Francis Wallace picked himself an
All-American team before the season began, but it was not really
official, and for the most part, that team will not be official until
it is re-released with a few minor changes.
The quality of football, both team and individual play, fluctu-
ates violently. At best the men who pick the All-American and even
the All-Conference elevens do so on the basis of the one-two, or at
most three games season in which they see a player perform.
, , * c *-
S AN EXAMPLE of the difficulties involved even in picking an All-
Conference team, look at this year's Associated Press team.
There are four Michigan men on each of the first two teams,
yet only one, Len Ford, is on the defensive unit, and he was se-
lected for the second team.
This is perhaps understandable when you stop and think about
this club. The defense was tops in the league, but the offensive record
compiled was sensetional. For the first time since 1339 a Conference
club averaged more than 400 yards per game, and for the first time in
history that a Midwest team topped the nation in passing.
But how about some of the other selections? The man who
tied Bob Chappuis for the most votes on the AP team was Leo
Nomellini of Minnesota. But Nomellini was dropped off the first
team by Bernie Bierman at least two weeks before the season
ended.
[OW ABOUT this fo an All-Conference team, excluding Michigan
players? Grant, Minn., and Crane, Ohio State, ends; Fritz, Min-
nesota, and Agase, Ill., tackles; Olsonoski, Minn., and Bingaman, Ill.,
guards; Wilson, Wis., center.
And in the backfield Malosky, Minn.; Aschenbrenner, and
Murakowski, Northwestern; and Cannavino, Ohio State.
Sure, that is a ridiculous team. It won't jive with any other se-
lected. But from my seat, I'd say those players were the most out-
standing against Michigan. They made the most tackles, picked up
the most yardage, but that's no indication of anything except where
I happened to be looking.
SEEMS LIKE OLD TIMES:
Former Mates Clash on Ice
Tomorrow in Puck Tilt Here

By Thel Associated P e,;s
NEW YORK _ Here are soe,
interesting notes Southe-nCali-
fornia will probably study for its'
forthcoming Rose Bowl game withI
the University of Michigan on
New Year's Day:
For the first time since the
Knute Rockne-Gus Dorais days at
Notre Dame, generally consid-
ered the dawning era of the for-
ward pass in modern collegiate
football, a middlewestern team is
the seasonal leader in forward
passing offense.
Sizzling Statistics
The Rose Bowl-bound Michigan;
Wolverines closed their undefeat-;
ed-untied season last Saturday
not only as the nation's best for-,
ward passing team but also as the;
total offensive leader.
Figures released yesterday by
the National Collegiate Athletic
Bureau showed the Wolverines
finished with a 412.7 yard per
game average gain via land and
air, and a 173.9 yard average per
game in forward passing alone.
It was the firsthtime since Ohio
State in 1939 that a Big Nine
team led the country in total of-
fense, it was the first time that a
Big Nine team finished above the
400-yard mark, and the first time
that a Midwest team won the
passing crown.
ARE YOU
ROSE BOWL BOUND?
If so, for your consideiation,
we present: '
* The Personality Cut
* The Michigan Crew
* The Zoot Flat Top
* The Facial or Scalp
Treatment
10 Barbers--No Waiting
T he Dascola Barbers
Between State & Mich. Theatres

First Mid-West Power To Win National
Aerial Title, Boasts 173.9 Yard Average

And the Wolverines just missed
by a shade of eclipsing another
passing mark. finihming with an
averacs of 10.2 yards per pass at-
tempt, compared to Tulsa's 1944
record of 10.4. The Bureau con-
ciders the pass-attempt average
as a true indication of a team's
passing potential, as the figure
includes both successful and un-
successful flings.
De troit Ranks High
The University of Detroit Ti-
tans copped the remaining offen-
sive plum during the weekend,
leading the rushers with an aver-
age of 319.7 yards per game. Penn
State, which has concluded its
undefeated-untied season, is the
only other team this week with
an average better than 300 yards
per game from rushing-301.4.
Notre Dame, concentrating on
the ground against Tulane, came
from nowhere to sixth in rushing
rankings with a 257.4 average,
while the Irish passing game
sagged from fifth at 149 yards a
week ago to eighth at 143.6.

1 , '1

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By B.S. BROWN
Many old friendships will be
renewed at 8 p.m. tomorrow at the
Michigan hockey rink when the
Detroit Red Wings invade Ann
Arbor for their second annual ex-
hibitiongame with the Wolverine
ice squad.
Several of the Michigan play-
ers are not only personal friends
of some of the Detroit stars but
also played hockey with them a
few years back.
Bill Jacobson, who will play
center on the second Michigan
line, was part of the Saskatocn
(Can.) Junior Quakers' first line
in 1943. The rest of the line was1
filled out by wing Jerry Couture
and center Max MNab. Bothhof
these lads are now displaying their
talents with the Red Wings and
will undoubtedly see action to-
morrow night.
"Jake" insisted that the
Quakers had the best junior
amateur team in Canad~a in
1"43 and that the aggregation
would have gone on to grab the
Memorial Cup, symbolic of
Canadian junior amateur su-
premacy, if MeNab hadn't col-
lapsed in the latter part of the
season with a heart ailment.
Pat Lundy, forward for the De-
troit team this year, was center
on the Quakers' second line.
"I .just hope I get to play with
the boys once again Friday night
when we switch lines," Bill add-
ed hopefully.
Jack Mclnnes, Ross Smith
and Al Renfrew boastTed
Lindsay, who is the leading
scorer this year for Jack. Adams,
and Red Kelly as their bosom
pals.
The three Wolverines attended
De LaSalle prep school in To-
ronto three years ago and their
school scrimmaged St. Michaels.
Both Kelly and Lindsay were with
St. Michaels at the time. The fol-
lowing year the two teams met
again in a regularly scheduled
contest and the skaters built up a
closer friendship.
Gordie MacMillan introduced
a bit of humor when asked if he
knew any of the Detroit play-
intereste in
mUsic?

ers. "No," he said, "but Kelly
was with St. Mikes last year
and they played in Moose Jaw
(Sisk), and that's mny home
town!"
Ed Brunteau, Red Wing lines-
man, played with Duluth, Minn.,
in 1937-38 and Jack MacDonald,
a high school lad at the time, was
goalie on the same team.
"We had a pretty good team
that year," M acDonald said.
We defeated the Port Arthur
Bearats wh went on to win
the Allen Cup at the end of the
season. That means they were
the best senior hockey team in
Canada, and we Leat 'em."
Captain Connie Hill piped up,
"Hey, Pete Horeck is a buddy of
mine. It'll be great seeing him
again." Connie played with Hor-
eck on the Sudbury amateur team
in 1940.I
Leahy Warns
Notre Dame
SOUTH BEND, Ind,, Nov. 26-
(/)-Warned by Coach Frank
Leahy that Southern California
will provide the toughest compe-
tition of the season next week.
Notre Dame's footoail squad went
through an intensive defense drill
today.
The practice session ended with
abrief pass defense drill, wiith
Johnny Lujack and Pete Ash-
baugh, defensive quarterbacks, in
the defensive backfield at theI
same time.I
Leahy, who personally scouted
the Trojans last Saturday, warned
that the Pacific Coast Conference
champions have a big, hard-
charging line and a fast, hard-
running backfield.
We print 'em all,
No job too large or small.
Programs - Tickets
Stationery - Announcements
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209 E. Washington Ph. 8132

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