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November 19, 1947 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-11-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

E SIX TtE MICfGAN UAILY

I",-1NFflY, 40V~ t 1, 14

PREMIER PERFOMA N
Speech Depart
To Give For (
The curtain will go up at 8 p.m.
today in Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
tre on a bill of four one-act plays
presented by students in advanced
theatre courses in the speech de-
partment.
The premeire performance of
"Flowers for Julia" will be wit-
nessed by its author, Austin Bach,
Russian Film
Opens at Lydia
Mendelssohn
"Russian Ballerina," new So-
viet film release, will open at 8:30
p.m. tomorrow for a three-day
run at Lydia Mendelssohn The-
atre under sponsorship of Art
Cinema League.
The first film from the USSR
dealing with the Russian ballet,
"Russian Ballerina" features the
Corps de Ballet of the Leningrad
State Theatre.
Galina Ulanova, leading Soviet
ballerina, is presented in a per-
formance of Tchaikovsky's "Swan
Lake." Maria Redina, a new ballet
star and Vladimir Gardin are also
featured.
The story concerns young artists
of the Soviet Ballet, both on and
off the stage.
"Russian Ballerina" is one of
the first major film features pro-
duced in the recently rebuilt Len-
film in Leningrad. Destroyed by
the war, the city is pictured
emerging again as a city of art
and culture.
Dialogue for "Russian Baller-
ina" is in Russian, and English
subtitles are provided. A short
subject will also be shown.
Reserved tickets for the film
will go on sale at 2 p.m. today at
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre box
office.
Seek Chess Enthusiasts
Students interested in seeing a
simultaneous chess exhibition
played by an expert chessman,
should contact Manuel Kaner, 214
Adams House, or phone 2-4401.
DE RUDA
ENDS*ERDEN S

SCE:
tent Students
)ne-Act IPIays
'48, who wrote the play for a play-
writing course last year.
Three Other Plays
Other plays to be presented are
"One Sunday Afternoon" by
James Hagan, "Lithuania" by
Rupert Brooke, and Geo.-,c Kelly's
"Poor Aubrey."
Although "Flowers; for Julia" is
the only student-written play on
the bill, the entire program is be-
ing staged and presented by stu-
dents.
Directors Listen
Acting as directors are Bar-
bara Ferguson, Jeanette Grand-
staff, Jack Iskin and Francile
Worthman. Stage managers are
William Allison, Ethel Kudrna,
Albert Nadeau and La Verne
Weber.
Admission to the plays is free to
the public but the demand for
tickets has exhausted the supply.
Patrons are advised that all res-
ervations must be called for by 6
p.m. Wednesday and all uncalled
for seats will be given out at that
time. There will be no new res-
ervations taken at the box office
until that hour.
Federalists T o
Sponsor Debate,
Members of the Michigan de-
bate team will present both sides
in a debate on, "World Federa-
tion Now," at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow,
in Rm. 319, of the Michigan Un-
ion.
Under the sponsorship of the
United World Federalists, the dis-
cussion will center upon the prac-
tical aspects of world federation
and the objectives of the campus
chapter, according to George
Shepard, president of the group.
Plans for the formation of a
Willow Village chapter of the Fed-
eralists will be discussed at the
meeting.
The debate is open to the pub-
lic.
Frenchman Will Speak
M. Rene Jasinski, professor of
French literature at the Univer-
sity of Paris, will speak on "Les
Generations litterraires," at 4:15
p.m., tomorrow in Kellogg Audi-
torium.

Choral Group
Will Present
Fifth Concert
Choir IOurs Nationi
In Twenty-Fifth Year
.The Westminster Choir, noted
American choral group, will pre-
sent the fifth in the current ser-
ies of Choral Union Concerts at
8:30 p.m. Monday at Hill Audi-
torium.
Celebrating their 25th anniver-
sary this year, the choir will ap-
pear here on its first transcon-
tinental tour since the war.
Volunteer Choir
Originally organized as the vol-
unteer choir of the Westminster
Presbyterian Church of Dayton,
Ohio, its first members were bus-
iness men and women and house-
wives who gave only their leisure
time to singing.
The high quality of the choir
gradually gained national atten-
tion, however, and the choir was
placed under the direction of a
concert manager.
Now a professional touring un-
it of Westminster Choir College,
non-sectarian musical college in
Princeton, N.J., the choir is di-
rected by Dr. John Finley Wil-
liamson, founder of the choir and
the college, and president of the
college.
Foreign Tours
Since its initial tour in 1921,
the group has appeared through-
out the United States and Can-
ada and in England, Scotland,
Austria, Norway, Jugoslavia, Rus-
sia, Czechoslovakia, and Hungary.
In its wide repertory are com-
positions ranging from the early
Italian masters through folk tunes,
Indian and cowboy songs, spirit-
uals and hymns to modern works
by Gershwin, Roy Harris, Samuel
Barber, Jerome Kern and Serge
Prokofieff.
The program Monday night will
include compositions by da Pale-
strina, Bach, MacDowell, Sibeli-
us, di Lasso, Brahms, Liszt, Deli-
us, Nicolau and Handel, as well
as groups of folk songs of Eng-
land and America, including sev-
eral Negro spirituals.
A limited number of tickets at
all prices are available at the of-
fice of the University Musical So-
ciety in Burton Tower.

Admiral Byrd
jWill em
ExIpegI'eces
First Exploatlions in1
Shenandoah Valley
Admiral Richard E. Byrd began
trainig or the career of explorer
when h was ien years old, by
rrnin irsj , ill OVt'r the Shenandoah
Byrd whI will present a lecture
and movie here at 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, in Hill Auditorium con-
tinued his exploring while he was
a ahild with a round-the-
world trip at. 12.
Plans Expedition
Two years later, he wrote in his
diary that he wvas going to the
North Pole,and drew designs of
the apparatus he would take with
him.
His dreams were interrupted by
his formal education, but soon
after his graduation from the
~solidated Vultee's experimenta United States Naval Academy, he
ictured here on its first flight, was called to Washington to give
auto didn't just roll to a stop- advice on flying over the North
nd had to crash land near San Pole in a dirigible.
pants. Makes First Trip
Although the government
dropped the project, he was able to
S: make the trip on pritecfunds.
Since that first expedition. Byrd
)r H ootenan y hs made explorations which have
Ill J1$IttIL~fadded imrmeasureably to geology,
science and history.
iiUnion, L a p Tickets for the lecture may be
Lee.,purchased from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
---- and from 2 to 5 p.m. today and to-
Bernie Asbell, Bill Broonzy and morrow, and from 10 a.m. to 1
Win Stricke in a varied program p in. and from 2 to 8:30 p.m.
SThusdy
of people's songs (a similar pro- sday.
gram sponsored by the chapter
last February, met with enthus- # rtYaI eiL at
iasm on the campus.)
Audience Singing iven
"11. " <7.tvvrt' ~ilo

It

Campus Highlights

I-

( iril ELberties ...
Three foreign students speak-
ing on basic liberties in their home
countries will lead a discussion
of the means to safeguard civil
rights in the United States, at
the regular AVC meeting at 7:30
p.m. today in the Union.
( :Trss Club Meets..
The Student Chess Club will
meet at 7:30 p.m. today in Rm.
302 of the Union.
The meeting is open to all
students.
* * *
Reserve Officers...
The present status of the re-
serve officer and reserve affairs
will be discussed by Major Roy
V. Lonsinger, of the Michigan
Military District in Detroit, at
7:30 p.m. today at the American
Legion Memorial Home.

The speech, sponiored by the
Reserve Officers Association, is
open to the public, according to
Capt. Bruce Corson, program
chairman.
MCF Bible Stidy...
Rev. Ironard Verduin, of tlhe
Students Evangelical Chapel,
will lead a discussion in Corin-
thians at the Bible study hour
of Michigan Christian Fellow-
ship at 8 p.m. today in Lane
Ilall.
* * *
Wl~olverine Club .. .
The Wolverine Club will meet
at 7 p.m. today in the Union to
complete plans for the Ohio State
weekend.
The Ensian picture will be tak-
en and jackets will be ordered, for
which a small deposit is required.

FLYING AUTO FIZZLES-Con
four-seater flying automobile p
ran out of gas yesterday, but the
it was in the air at the time a
Diego Bay, injuring its two occup
FOLK MUSIC, BALLADS
Ticket Sales fo
Be gin Today a
Ticket sales will get under way
today at the Union and League I
for the "Hootenanny," the pro-4
gram of folk music and ballads
to be presented at 8:30 p.m. Fri-
day in Rackham Auditorium.
Sales will continue through Fri-
day, but there will be no tickets

available at the door. The new "Hootenanny" will of-
The "Hootenanny," brought fer the audience a better oppor-
back to Ann Arbor by the campus tunity than the first edition. to
AVC, will feature Betty Sanders, sing along with the performers.
A sixteen page book of songs will
Radio Dram a be distributed to all as the official
program of the songfest.
W ill Re Seen Miss Sanders and Asbell both
appeared here in the February
"Hootenanny." But Broonzy and
Techniques used in broadcast- Stricke will be making their Ann
ing drama will be demonstrated Arbor debuts Friday.
in the presentation of an "Ald- Stricke, a bass baritone, has
rich Family" play by the speech been trained to sing on the con-
department at its monthly as- cert and opera stages. He has,
sembly at 3 p.m. today in Lydia ; however, devoted himself to ap-
Mendelssohn Theatre. pearances at rallies, union halls,
The radio play, which is open and school auditoriums, demon-
to the public, is directed by Gar- strating, as he points out," how
net R. Garrison, speech depart- folk songs and people's songs can
ment instructor, who was pro- speak out for the people and
duction director for NBC for five their needs."
years prior to joining the faculty People's Songs
this fall. In the drama, Bill Brom- Stricke is chairman of People's
field will play Henry; James Songs in the midwest, and has
Drummond, Homer; Sam, Rich, been heard in such radio programs
Mr. Aldrich, and Shirley Loeb- as "Hymns of All Churches," thE
lich, Mrs. Aldrich. "National Barn Dance," and the
Others in the cast include Por- "Stude Terkel Show."
tia Middlesworth, Clara Behring- Bill Broonzy has been singlec
er, Janet Richards, Marilyn Scheer out by the Jazz Record Book as
and Audrey Lawrence. James one of the singers whose ma-
Schvione and Dean Coston are terial best reflects the authentic
in charge of sound, and techni- backgrounds of American folk
cian director is Roger Shepard. music-blues, ballads and jazz.

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Marshall Bidwell, lecturer in
organ in the school of music,
will be heard in recital at 4:15
p.m. today in Hill Auditorium.
Karg-Elert's "Homage to Han-
del," is one of the works to be
included in the program. Written
in memory of George Frederic
Handel, who represented the close
relation between English and Ger-
man music, the work includes
themes from Handel's G Minor
Suite for piano as well as the fa-
mous Hallelujah Chorus from
"The Messiah."
Dr. Bidwell is organist and di-
rector of music at the Carnegie
Institute. The program is open
to the general public without
charge.
Read and Use
The Daily Classifieds

WHY NOT STUDY IN MEXICO?
Mexico City College - On Approved V.A. List
Winter Quarter, January 6
Spring Quarter, March 31
Instruction in English. Emphasis on Spanish language
and literature, Latin American studies (especially art,
anthropology, commerce, history and international
relations.)
Housing and food available at reasonable prices.
MEXICO CITY COLLEGE
San Luis Potosi 154
Mexico, D. F., Mexico
PLEASE THE FAMILY
:AT CHRISTMAS TIME
4 With
O OLD CHINESE PORCELAIN
IMPORTED JAPANESE PRINTS
HAND-MADE Tablecloths and
Napkins of IRISH MADEIRA LINEN
C Across from the Arcade - 330 MAYNARD STREET

.I -Soong

aAa --
+ r I y, tt rEU

o BRING YOUR LAUNDRY TO
THE "LAONDERETTE" AND
PLACE IT IN THE BENDIX.
EACH BENDIX TAKES UP TO 9
LBS. YOU CAN USE AS MANY
MACHINES AS YOU NEED.
* ADD SOAP-WAIT OR SHOP
WHILE THE BENDIX DOES
YOUR WORK AUTOMATICALLY.
O TAKE YOUR LAUNDRY HOME
IN 30 MINUTES-CLEANSED,
SWEET, WHITE, DAMP-DRY.
up to 9 lbs. 30c
Washed -Rinsed -Dampdried
Soap is Free
NOW!
Your Launderette Offers
Complete
DRYING SERVICE
Yes, we have just installed
the famous Bock extracting
and Chicago drying equipment.
Now you can take your clothes
home completely dry - ready
to iron or fold and put away.
No more tedious time wasting
job of hanging them on the
clothes-line and taking them
down.
This new service
costs you just 25c
for each Bendix load

THE NUMBER 1 NON-FICTION BEST SELLER
Read the book
whose publication
has been
front-page news
on two
continents
F.W

((
%/
% l
1 //
if
°
a
a-
rc g
u
,/
lf r!
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(
, .

You'll Relish Greyhound's
Savings and Convenience
It's so easy to arrange that
happy Thanksgiving home-
coming by Greyhound. Time-
saving schedules mean added
hours of Holiday pleasure,
while famous Greyhound com-
fort lets you 'arrive refreshed,
relaxed, and ready for the fun
of the occasion. And, best of
all, Greyhound's amazingly
low fares protect your travel
budget. Check up now on
Greyhound's convenient sched-
ules everywhere. Get the most
from your Thanksgiving dollar.

Business, too,
must have expert navigation

p ERE's'
. gla SERVICE t
!j ere"/VENTS
Whatever the occasion-
: birthdays, graduations or
J~ just the desire to visit the \
folks, Greyhound's nation-
wide service provides
frequent schedules to carry
/ you swiftly, comfortably,
S and economically.

N the telephone business, much
of the knowledge of "where we
are" and guidance as to "where
we are headed" comes from the
analysis of statistics.
Telephone statisticians and
engineers are constantly studying

The work of these men is vital
to our never-ending task of im-
proving telephone service. In such
work many college-trained men
have found satisfying and reward-
ing careers.
And this is but one of the many
interestin nhases of the tele-

I

LOW COST FARES

I

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