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November 16, 1947 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-11-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 2G, 1947

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAC" IV WTVW.

I, SUWDAY~ UA~W WUW

Panhel Presents
Stan Kenton at IM
'Elysian Eve' Features Greek Theme;
Ticket Sales Will Continue This Week

Junior Dues
Collections

Casbah's New Request Card

Prove

Successful,

also Amusing

Begin

Soon

"Elysian Eve," this year's all-
campus Panhel Ball, which will
be presented from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.
K Friday in the Intramural Build-
ing, will feature that "Artistry in
Rhythm" of Stan Kenton and his
band.
The Kenton troupe, whose
rhythmic interpretations of mod-
ern "progressive jazz" gave them
the national spotlight in 1946,
have maintained their popularity
this season, playing for capacity
crowds on their recent western
tour.
The constant pulse and har-
monic appeal of the Kenton ar-
rangements have created a pop-
ular demand for concert ap-
pearances, and Stan will do an
eastern series of "elevated jazz"'
concerts illustrating the Kenton
version of "American" music.
The 1947 Panhellenic presenta-
tion will innovate several new fea-
tures. A reception committee
which will greet patrons and their
guests has been arranged and the
x -
Buy and Hold
Savings Bonds I

following. housemothers .will
compose the committee: Mrs.
john Owen, Kappa Kappa Gam-
ma,; Mrs. Lawrence C. Piatt,
Delta Delta Delta; Mrs. Mildred
Anike, Pi Beta Phi; and Mrs. Vir-
ginia Williams, Kappa Delta.
Another innovation will be the
seating arrangement whereby
groups of friends may sit out
dances together. Special booths
will be set up for sororities and
independent houses. This year's
affair will be semi-formal but
men owning tuxedos are re-
quested to wear them.
Alpha Phi Omega, national serv-
ice fraternity, will handle the
men's check room donating all the
proceeds to the Fresh Air Camp.
The decorations and programs
for "Elysian Eve" will follow the
ancient Greek theme chosen by
the central committee. Gigantic
columns and balloon grape clus-
ters will give the I-M Building
the simple atmosphere of an-
cient Greece, according to Lois
Steere, Alpha Xi Delta, decora-
tions chairman.
Ticket sales which are open
to all women on campus, will con-
tinue this week from 1 p.m. to
5 p.m. in the Undergraduate Of-
fice of the League.

A campaign for the collection
-f junior dues will begin tomorrow,
it was announced by Pat Hanne-
;an, general chairman of Junior
Girls Play.
The drive will be conducted by
±he finance committee of the play.
This committee is headed by
Jackie Reid, treasurer of the play.
During the campaign, mem-
bers of the finance committee
will personally contact all jun-
ior women on campus. A can-
vass will be made of all dormi-
tories, league houses and sor-
ority houses.
Announcement will be made at
a later date concerning the meth-
od to be followed for collection of
dues from those women living in
private homes.
The funds collected during
this drive will be used to fin-
ance the Junior Girls Play, an-
nual play written, directed and
produced by junior women.
The amount of the dues will be
$1.00 per person. The committee
requests that all junior coeds have
this amount available when the
collector arrives at the residence.
Tula Will Give
Indian Dances
At Barbour Gym
Tula, one of the foremost auth-
orities on dance ethnology, will
present a program of original
Mexican Indian dances at 7 p.m.
Wednesday in the Barbour Gym
dance studio, sponsored by the
Modern Dance Club.
The program will be given for
the Modern Dance and Ballet
Clubs. the WAA board, and stud-
ents and faculty of the Women's
Physical Education Department,
and will include a 'master" class
in special native dance techniques
given by Tula for the members of
the Modern Dance Club.
Tula, a member of the American
Anthropological Association, and
the New Mexico Archeological and
American and Michigan Folk Lore
Societies, has collected her pro-
gram of native dances through
direct research with the Indians
of New Mexico.

The latest innovation at the
Campus Casbah, the introduction
of special request cards, has prov-
ed to be a great success with dan-
cers and sometimes a source of
amusement to its originator, band
leader Fran Wine-Gar.
His band has been flooded with.I
requests for tunes ever since the,
cards were printed this fall. They
carry a simple message:
"Dear Fran Wine-Gar . . . 1
Would you please play (such and3
such) . . . Special Occasion? .
Thank You! ... (Name and Add-
ress).
Some of them filled out with
Wine-Gar's singer, "Nola," who
sorts them, censors them, and
gives them to Wine-Gar to play.
"Nola" has thoughtfully pre-
served some of the cleverer re-
quests: -
Request: "A Ghost of a Chance."

Occasion: "Baptized."
Request: "Sinner Kissed an An-
gel."
Occasion: "We are here!"
Request: "Blue Champagne."
Occasion: "Just for the hell of
it."
Request: "Imagination."
Occasion: "Yes."
Request: "Near You.'
Occasion: "I'm Near Him."
Request: "Peg O' My Heart."
Occasion: (No answer: just a
lipstick kiss-print).
Request: "Little Brown Jug."
Occasion: "Victory."

Tournament
To BeHeld
Undergraduates Will Play
In Contract Bridge Event
Nelson B. Jones, chairman of
the Intercollegiate Bridge Tourna-
ment Committee, announced that
invitations to compete in the 1948
National Intercollegiate Bridge
Tournament have been sent to of-
ficials of 318 colleges and univer-
sities.
Only undergraduates are elig-
ible to play in the duplicate Con-
tract Bridge event for the title
and trophy, and the Committee
requires that the approval of its
dean be granted before a college
can officially enter the tourna-
ment.
A preliminary round will be
played by mail in February and
the sixteen highest ranking pairs
will meet for the face-to-face fi-
nals in Chicago on April 23 and
24.
To insure representation of all
parts of the country in the finals,
the country is divided into eight
zones.

We have our own innovation
suggest. Why not have Fran
Nola read 'em to everybody?

to
or

e
X
4
4
M

To get rid of shiny spots on
those new suede pumps try rub-
bing an emery board gently over
them.

MODEL MANAGER-helen Fraser (age 28) is model and director
of the Barbizon School of Modeling in New York City.
Modeling Survey 'Debunks'
'Debunkers' of Ancient Art

BLACK BEAUTY
by Kayser
C -C
~<- ~y-t
What could be more Precious to her on
Christmas /)or1111 tau one of our be-
guililiigy ruffled gown and slid sets. They
are made for figure fitting perfection at
all timles.
SIzEs 34-40
SLIP . . . $4.95
GOWN ... $5.95
274eVAN RUNSh

SDressmaker Stit

(EDITOR'S NOTE-This article was
sent special, to The Daily from the
Barbizon School of Modeling.
NEW YORK-Ever since the
day Eve tucked together some fig
leaves and staged the first fashion!
parade for Adam, women have
been modeling.
The only difference today is
that what Eve and her many
daughters have done through thel
years, as amateurs, many girls areI
now finding a highly lucrative and
satisfying profession.
But so much has been written
"debunking" the profession that
a survey was made among models
in New York from every state in
the Union to determine the facts.
Actually modeling is easier to
break into, and brings better fi-
nancial returns sooner than do
most jobs open to girls.
New York is Mecca
There are approximately 1,000
photographic models and more
than 8,000 fashion models em-
ployed in the United States, but
90 per cent of them work in New
York. It is quite natural then for
girls who are seriously interested
in modeling as a career to come
here. For, within a radius of one
or two miles, are the most val-
uable contacts in America for the
model.
Some writershconvey the im-
pression that there is an extra-
ordinary amount of competition in
the profession. That is far from
being the case. There is competi-
tion, but it exists at the point of
acceptance rather than in model-
ing itself.
Naturally, a woman must have
certain attributes to succeed in
the modeling profession, just as I
she needs necessary qualifications
for success in any field. Miss
Helen Fraser, director of the Bar-
bizon School of Modeling says,
"If a girl is attractive facially
and has nice figure proportions,
she is a 'natural' for fashion mod-
eling. And if she knows how to
model clothes she should have
very little d si fsulsy in gettin" into
the field."
Competition Over'stressed t
Considering the numberof mod-
els working in New York alone,
the competition which new models
encounter is negligible compared
to other fields. There are dozens
of models at work for every wom-
an employed as designer, adver-
tiser, publisher or merchandiser.
Marriage need not interfere
with a model's career, for many
nationally - known models are
married and continue earning top
salaries. The "wolf" menace is
highly exaggerated, most models
insist. Using this warning to dis-
courage women from entering the

profession makes most of the
cover girls smile.
"The average model, in my ex-
perience," says model Nancy Sims,
"works about as hard as the aver-
age successful stenographer. Yet
the compensations are far greater,
and the work is much more ex-
citing.
Models Earn Steady Incomes
While the photographic model's
earnings are usually at a higher
rate, the income of the fashion
models range from $50 to $75
weekly and has the advantage of
consistency. The work of the fash-
ion model is leisurely in tempo
and has an intrinsic glamour of
its own.
"It's a model life!" the models
say.

In Pacific Verdonra

f4 Fine

Wool Crepe

CHITMAS GIFTS fJ
FOR T HE VM ...
Hand-made
Tablecloths and Napkins of
c IRISH MADEIRA LINEN
Old Imported Wall Prints
Also Large Scentedj
CHRISTMAS CANDLES U
Across from the Arcade - 330 MAYNARD STREET
o<- <-><--><--0<--0<-50<->0< -yo< ->o-- W

49.75
at the College Shop
ENCORE for this perfect little suit!
Its contour-curved lines slim and
pretty as a dress. Dainty double
collar, decorative metal buttons on
the jacket. Just right to wear un-
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Dove grey or black. Sizes 9 to 15.
Surrs-SECOND FLOOK
At the College Shop
A~ZX
fS/

RJ

-RTh h!I fl FLFI7LrT _ Ri rn-i f TI T f1TL1J1T

"t
'¢-

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8 Nickels Arcade

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i

H
AMAZING RESULTS
ACHIEVED IN ANN ARBOR
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TRY ONE
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%AN&
Y L~io~i1 OCS:-j
", .,a
Y
B' OTANhY
+ ANOLIN
j~A P ,/

I

Picture you in this dainty Naturalizer.-.-
so in keeping with this season's newest

fashions.

99

Beauty Preparations
A little lanolin is good for dry skin.
But a lot is better. That's why these
famous beauty preparations soften
ans omntb vour kinso effective-

Superfatted Lanolin Soap, 85c
Box of 3 ... 1.50 Box of 6
Formula 70 Cream, 1.25 and 2.00
Hand Lotion, 1.00 and 1.75

I

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