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November 14, 1947 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-11-14

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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1947

THE MIICHIGAN DAILY

Past Hopwood
Winners Take
More Laurels
Former 'U' Students
Join Literary Staffs
Winning Hopwood Awards has
been one stepping stone to success
for former University students,
according to recent reports of the
activities of past winners.
Baxter Hathaway, winner of a
major Hopwood fiction and poetry
award in 1936, is now editor-in-
chief of Epoch., a new q'uarterly of
contemporary literature published
at Cornell University.
Also on the staff of Epoch is
John A. Sessions, winner of a fic-
tion award in 1945. In the maga-
zine's fall issue appears "Decora-
tion Day," a short story by John
Moore, major poetry award win-
ner in 1936; and six poems by
John Ciardi, winner of a major
poetry award in 1939.
Arthur Orrmont, winner of mi-
nor awards in fiction, 1943, '44
and '45, who has been an edito-
rial assistant since December.,
1945, with Farrar, Straus, has been
nade assistant editor.
"The Ides of Youth," a short
story by William P. Gram, for-
mer member of the University
English department, who won ma-
jor Hopwood drama and poetry
awards in 1945, appears in the cur-
rent issue of Family Circle.
"The Burning Spring," a novel
centered around the Finger Lakes
district of New York State, by Fy-
nette Fiske Rowe, winner of a ma-
jor Hopwood fiction award in 1934
for "The Chapin Sisters," was
published this month.
Vet's
x Cheeks'

FYE SPUD FUTURE:
Potatoes May Be Glamorized
With Improved New Look'

WASHINGTON, Nov. 12 -OP)-
What the potatoes of this coun-
try need is a new look.
And the Department of Agticul-
ture, the best friend the potato
ever had, is out to make sure
that it gets one.
Maybe you always have-thought
that:
1. The potato is okay as it is,
or
2. As far as the potato is con-
cerned, you can take it or leave
it.
Potato Complexions
It's this second proposition that
has the Agriculture people as pale
and sickly looking as, well, res-
taurant potatoes.
Too many people are leaving it.
So, says a bulletin from the
Department of Agriculture, a re-
search program has been started
to see if the potato can't be im-
proved from a consumer's stand-
point.
Specialized Spuds
By the time they have finished
their work, the agriculture .spe-
sialicts hope they can tell which
potato is best for baking, for
boiling, for frying, for salads.
If you think getting excited
about' a potato- is sort of silly,
you don't know your potatoes.
They're the No. 1 table product
in this country, and principal food
in many parts of the world.
On the average, every man,
woman and toddler in the U.S.
First Charter
Flight Service
Started Here
A newly formed Ann Arbor or-
ganization announced yesterday
the opening of the only air travel
charter service in the immediate
area.
Sky Service Inc., counting two
University students among its per-
sonnel, has initiated charter flight
service from Ann Arbor Airport
to any destination.
The service will employ the
Beach "Bonanza," a four-seat
plane, with a cruising speed of
approximately 160 mph. and a
range of 500 miles. The "Bonan-
za" has a baggage capacity of 100
bounds.
John Harper, student of aero-
nautical engineering and public
relations manager for the service,
pointed out that the service should
prove especially valuable to stu-
dents desiring to make trips to
points beyond regular airline
routes.
Donald Jennings, also a student
in the University's aeronautical
engineering department, is the
service's flight dispatcher and
general manager.
Harper said that students anA

eats potatoes at the rate of three
bushels a year.
A potato famine in Ireland sent
the U. S. one of its largest groups
of immigrants. A fuss over Bava-
rian food supplies brought on the
potato war of 1778-1779.
And in this country, during de-
pressions, we stop eating more
costly meats and switch to the
potato.I

Accountants Open
Annual Meeting
The 22nd annual Michigan Ac-
counting Conference, with an ex-
pected attendance of approxi-1
iately 55 acccuntants, will be
held tomorrow at the Rackham
Building.
Opening session will be held at
9 a.m. in the Rackham Lecture
Hall, followed by luncheon at
12:15 p.m. in the League Ball-
room. Featured speaker at the
luncheon will be John A. Perkins,
state budget director, and former
professor of political science here.

Dutch Music To Be Presented
A concert devoted to 15th, 16th, Mason, instructor in organ, will
and 17th century Dutch music will also illustrate Dutch psalmody in
be given by School of Music stu- the 16th and 17th centuries.
dents Sunday in Alumni Memo- The second portion of the pro-
r gram will consist of 15th and 16th
rial Hll. Icentury secular music.
The first half of the program The concert is one of a series of
will feature music based on the cultural programs being held at
chorale of the period following the the University in celebration of
Dutch Reformation. The brass en- a hundred years of Dutch settle-
semble, conducted by Prof. Clif- ment in Michigan.
ford P. Lillya, will present four-
part settings of Psalms 25, 42, and Juy and Hold
36. The Madrigal Singers, under
the direction of Prof. Wayne Dun- -Sa itu( Bonds
lap, with selections by Marilyn ii 7

SMART
PEOPLE
USE
DAILY

CLASSIFIEDS

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Checks for the following veter-
ans are being held at the Ann Ar-
bor Post Office:
Barthel, Vilas F.; Berman, Wil-
liam A.; Bisbee, Clark J.; Bosch,
John M.; Brazell, Robert E.; Che-
not, James E.; Clark, Everett R.;
Davis, Donald D.; Davis, Paul
i George; Deal, Edwin M.; Dinnan,
Leo T.; Emig, George R.; Fiteny,
Louis Michael; Flood, George C.
Gerweck, Lee A.; Gomberg,
David L.; Gremel, Norman A.;
Hartt, Harold; Hartz, Morton M.;
Hochlowski, Walter .
Johnston, Edmund C.; John-
stone, Robert M. Jr.; Korbein,
James R.; Larson, Raymond J.;
Lehman, Leroy G.; Madar, Elmer
F.; Newberg, Victor E.; Nielsen,
Charles Edward; Oles, Mrs. Mar-
A garet F.; Pollard, Neith J.; Roy-
ston, Robert W.; Shepard, Roger
,; Slocum, Gail Victor; Virgo,
Richard S.
Veterans listed above should
pick up their checks by Nov. 18

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when they will be returned to Co- townspeople desiring to charter a
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