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November 09, 1947 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-11-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER, 9, 1947
CROWDED IN GAY 90'S TOO:
DailyReporter Probes Capus islory

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I

Co-op Day Wil
Mark Fifteenth

.

By RAY COURAGE
It's hard to believe, but the
same old crowded classroom, con-
ditions were known and moaned
about in this university as far
back as the gay 90's when the en-
tire enrollment was crowding
2,800.
In the President's report for
the school year '96 and '97, the
late acting President Harry B.
Hutchins noted that "instructors
labored under serious embarrass-
ment by reason of the large
classes they were compelled to
conduct."
Gymnasium Report
The old gymnasium also re-
ceived attention in the President's
report when it was discovered
that many of the lockers were
being rented by students whose
only interest in athletics was re-
stricted to the ecstasy of a hot,
bath.
It is not known whether or not
the gay 90's were the cause, but
nevertheless it was in 1896 that
the first Dean of Women was
appointed.
For you who are not up to date
on your "U" history, the first
Dean of Women was Eliza M.
Mosher, for whom Mosher Hall
is named.
Physical Education
An interesting aspect of Dean
Mosher's job was that she also
taught hygiene and gave general
physical examinations to fresh-
men women. It-was not mentioned
in the President's report whether
or not she checked for alcoholic
breath.

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CAMPUS GATE--A view of the entrance to the diagonal back
at the turn of the century. Even then professors and students
declared that the college, with its 2,800 enrollment, was badly
overcrowded.
According to the President's re- r~is that the requirements for en-
irt, Dean Mosher was the first trance have been raised consid-
oman to campaign for the re- erably since then.
squishing of credits for physical To illustrate the expansion of
ucation. She complained that the University since 1896, Dr.
e gymnasium work was being Robbins compared the enrollment
terrupted by the irregular at- of '96, which was 2,800 with the
ndance,- and that this problem present day figure of 20,637, in-
uld only be solved by giving cluding 5,334 women.
edits for that work. He also added that the number
The University was one of the of volumes in the U. library is
st to accept women into the now 1,299,720 as compared to
edical schools, according to Dr. 113,930 in 1896.
ank E. Robbins, Assistant to Classrooms may be crowded but
e President. one thing for certain is that our
edical School Enrollment University is not the same as it
The number of women enrolled was when acting President Hutch-
the medical school in 1896 was ins wrote his president's report
"In the last 50 years this fig- in 1897.
e has increased to 75 for the-
esent scshool year," Dr. Robbins Lynn Receives Award
id.
He pointed out that a possible Karyl V. Lynn, Jr., 48BAd, from
planation of this small increase Hershey, Pa., has been awarded
the Pittsburgh University of Mich-
igan Club Scholarship for the

An i versctry
Nationwide System
Started by Michigan
Celebrating the fifteenth year of
co-ops on campus, Co-op Day
Wednesday will be designed to give
:ther students a chance to see co-
operative principles at work, Wer-
ner Blumenthal, publicity chair-
man, announced.
First to offer students economi-
cal living under the Rochdale
principles, Michigan's co-ops in
1932 began a movement that is
now spreading throughout the na-
tion, including more than 50,000
students.
Booths will be set up Wednes-
day to distribute information both
on the student cooperative move-
ment and on the national con-
sumer and producer cooperative
system.
Also featured will be a dinner,
for members and guests at Lane
Hall.
The dinner will be followed by
movies and folk dances by mem-
bers of the houses. The annual
business meeting will be held at
this time.
Open houses will be held at the
five houses operating under the
Inter-Cooperative Council on the
Friday evening following Co-op
Day.
Members of cooperative houses,
do their own cooking, and put in
a designated number of hours each
week performing household chores.
In this way, cooperative houses
are able to offer residents good
living conditions at a lower-than-
average cost.

The Daily Classiieds
Read and Use

CHOICE
SELECTIONS
Hand-made
IRISH MADEIRA LINEN
Table Cloths and Napkins
. . . also -J
Large Scented
CHRISTMAS CANDLES
incitA r~4t So
Across from the Arcade - 330 MAYNARD STREET
C - 7 U o ; --c--X->0-> -><-><-<= >0<--> = <-

Fall semester.j

House Committee Branded
Disgrace' by IRA Members
y-

A resolution branding the Un-
American Activities Committee a
"disgrace to the American Con-
gress," and calling for its abolition,
was passed by the Inter-Racial
Association at its last meeting.
Labelling the recent Hollywood
investigation by the committee a
"violation of civil rights," the
resolution stated that "by its in-
quisitorial methods it (the com-
mittee) has labeled the greatest
anti-fascist and pro-democratic
liberals as un-American."
Citing the example of "Cross-
fire," a movie dealing with anti-
Semitism, which was called "Un-
American" by the committee, the
resolution said that the "real pur-
poses of the committee become
clear; namely to aid reaction, to

stop any honest attempts to solve
the real issues which face the
American neople."
The resolution pointed out that
Rep. Rankin, founder and mem-
ber of the committee, "is a race
supremist and was elected to Con-
gress from Mississippi in a dis-
trict where 6,000 out of 230,000
adults are allowed to vote."
Stating that "they have proved
by their sensational scare tactics,
their unconstitutional methods,
that they are a disgrace to the
American congress," the resolu-
tien concluded:
"'Ve urge that the House of Rep-
resentatives at its special session
pass Rep. Sabbath's Resolution
No. 46: to abolish the Un-Ameri-
can Activities Committee."

Talamon To Deliver Openmg
Talk in French Club Series
The 1947-48 lecture series of Le French movies, to be presented on f
Cerche Francaise will open with a the final day of the series.
reading of short French dramatic Tickets to the series may be ob
pieces by Prof. Rene Talamon of twined in the office of the Ro- t
the Romance langitage depart- mance language department.b
ment, at 4:10 p.m. Tuesday, in Members of Le Cercle will be ad
Alumni Memorial Hall. mitted free upon presentation of COE S
In addition to Prof. Talamon, their membership cards.
speakers will include Prof. Warner -
Patterson, on Louis XIII; Prof. Sir Isaac Newton, world-famous
Arthur Hackett, who will give song mathematician and physicist,',
recital; Prof. Daniel Augsburger, made little progress with his CHOICE!
on "France and Switzerland- school books as a young boy until
Summer 1947"; Prof. Antoine Jo- a successful fight with another
bin on "Le Moyne d'Iberville, the boy aroused his spirit, according & Luxurious camel ha
Cid of Canada"; and a series of to the Encyclopedia Britannica.ot foryou cm ad
coats for your comfort and
I j Vwarmth. Boxy enough for
I that casual look in sizes
SBA T EL ET 9-15 of buff or nude.
British Imported
Beautifully decorated with large appliqued rose Camel Hair.
Attractively boxed ready for Christmas-
giving in peach, blue and gold
ALWAYS REASONABLY PRICED
307 South state
11 Nickels Arcade Open Daily 9:30 to 5:30
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COLORFUL FABRIC GLOVES
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PLIABLE LEATHER GLOVES
Rich leathers in kidskins, cape-
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To Enhance A Basic Dress
* 1-5 STRAND PEARL CHOKERS
Select the length and number of strands in irrides-
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Link chain, head and mesh chokcrs in lold or silver
priced only 1,00 to 2.50.
\* GLITTERY RHINESTONE NECKLACES
« a g ~Crystal or colored set.- in single, trile o01doibl

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