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October 24, 1947 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-10-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24,

SIX FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24,

olverines Set for

Brown .J g Battle wit Gopers
Crisle Readies 'Defense - 9p' -
To StopGopher Attack
Minnesota's Huge Forward Wall To Test
Highscoring Skill of FastMichigan Backs b r
Michigan Coach H. 0. "Fritz"
Crisler drove his offensive-minded , I $ '

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OH DARN . . . A very disgusted Wildcat express es his sentiments in no uncertain terms as "Dutch"
.Urban (53) Michigan center, brings down a Northwestern ball carrier. Donn Hershberger (82) seems
bored by the whole thing, but Wolverine guard, Don McClellan appears anxious to get mixed up in
the action.
ALL THIS AND 'M' TOO:
Jayvee Duties Give Gib Holgate a Change
After Copper Mines, Wisconsin, and Army

Coach Gib Holgate, who handles
the reins of the Jayvee squad
when George Ceitham attends to
his scouting duties, finds this life
a welcome change from that of
working a copper mine.
James Gibson Holgate first
came to - the University of
Michigan with the now-famous
football contingent of Marine

transfers from Wisconsin in the
summer of 1943. In fact his
roommate and best buddy was
Elroy "Crazy Legs" Hirsch, who,
no doubt, was very influential in
making Gib football minded.
But, let's trace Gib's rather
rocky road through college from
the beginning. He graduated from
high school in Milwaukee, Wiscon-

Ii. - -

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sin, in 1938. Following his gradu-
ation he got a job in a copper
mine. After two years of this he
thought he'd try college life, and
he entered the University of Wis-
consin in 1940.
Shortly afterward came the
transfer to Michigan, but his
stay was limited to a few months
as he was transferred to Paris Is-
land in November, 1943. He re-
ceived his commission and then
spent more than a year overseas.
"That's the only way to get an
appreciation of the problems faced
on the field," he said, "I know that
the experience I got has helped me
no end in my work this fall."
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squad through another series of
heavy drills today and thereby
tipped off his thoughts on Satu -
day's game with Minnesota.
For the first time this year
Crisler has shown more than
a token interest in an oppon-
ent's ability to score on the
ground-and to keep his Wol-
verines from scoring the same
way.
In pre-game practice sessionsl
prior to Michgian's first four
games, the Wolverines brain trust
laid primary defensive emphasis
on breaking up pass plays. With
the Gophers, it's a different story.
For this year's Minnesota squad
-like all squads coached by Ber-
nie Bierman-uses the airways
as a diversionary threat rather
than as a main offensive weapon.
Crisler put it very aptly ear-
lier in the week when he de-
scribed the Minnesota attack as
"crunch, crunch, crunch through
the tackles." That is Bierman-
style football, and that is what
Michigan must stop Saturday.
More than that, Crisler must
figure out some method of moving
the ponderous Gopher forward
wall out of the way so his own
backs can gain ground, just in
case the Wolverine aerial attack
bogs down.
All of these angles were very
much in evidence at yesterday's
practice session, the last heavy
workout before gametime. Cris-
ler had the hard-working Jay-
vees running Minnesota ground
plays and forming Gopher de-
fensive alignments.
To the Michigan line, Crisler
preached timing, timing, and more
timing as the most effective avail-
able substitute for Minnesota's
weight up front. On defense, he
had them knifing and submarin-
ing to reach the ball-carrier.
Despite the elaborate prepara-
tions to penetrate the Gopher
defense with rushing plays, most
would rely more on its air arm
observers predicted Michigan
to gain than at any previous
time this year.
The Wolverines wound up yes-
terday's workout by giving the
principle pass-tossers an oppor-
tunity to loosen their arms and
also sent the punters through their
paces. A blackboard drill tomor-
row will conclude preparations.
. . . DO YOU KNOW that
during his tenure at Michigan
Coach Crisler has compiled an
enviable record of 61 wins, 16
losses and 3 ties and that in
those ninetyears he has never
lost more than three games in
a single season.

Fall Practice
Defense Stressed
In Daily Workout
High hopes for bringing back
the Big Nine cage title to Mich-
igan are held by Captain Bob
Harrison and approximately fif-
teen members of last year's squad
who are working out daily in the
I-M Building.
Not since the 1928-29 cam-
paign have the Wolverines been
able to claim a Western Con-
ference basketball champion-
ship, but this year the story
mayread a little differently.
Drills began officially at the*
beginning of the week with stress
being placed on defensive duties.
Coach Ozzie Cowles, who remains
silent when the word "champion-
ship" is mentioned in his pres-
ence, is striving for a well rounded
basketball aggregation rather than
an "I'llhave to run up more points
than you" combination.
The ground work for this theory
was begun last season when the
Maize and Blue cagers held the
opposition to an average of 40
points per game on a rugged 20
game schedule.
During the two hour prep pe-
riod Cowles' charges have been
handling defensive assignments
in order to get the feel of the
ball. Exercises have included
bringing the ball down the court
and "two on one," while Cowles
and his assistant Joe Vancisin
interrupt at any time to correct
individual mistakes.
Towards the end of the sessions,
the cagers have been alternated
in groups of three at the forward
and guard positions for short
"three on three" drills, designed
to perfect their court finesse. Of-
fensive practice up to date has
centered on improvement in shoot-
ing, deceptive ball-handling, and
the work of the centers.
1948
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Michigan's track coach Ken
Doherty looked forward to the
coming track sealson yesterday
and found it very difficult to be
optimistic. Missing from this
year's squad will be many key
point-getters whose places cannot
easily be filled.
Such men as Dick Forrestal,
Hack Goplin, Captain Charlie
Birdsall and Jack Martin will not
be around when the indoor season
opens next February.

The outlook has its bright spots,
nevertheless. Returning will be 11
lettermen including such stand-
outs as Chuck Fonville, Big Nine
indoor and outdoor shot put
champion, Herb Barten, confer-
ence half mile king, and Val John-
son, sprinter and quarter miler.
Added to that list will be hurdler
Bill Osgood, quarter miler George
Shepherd 2nd, and two milers Alex
Morris and Rog Kessler.
In the field events Ed Ulvestad

will be returning for another year
of pole vaulting, Bob Fancett will
try his skill again at the broad
jump and Bob Harris will be the
Wolverines' top high-jumper.
Augmenting the lettermen will
be a group of tracksters who saw
action last year but did not earn
letters. Outstanding among this
group are sprinters Jim Morrish
and Jim Witherspoon, hurdlers
Bill Wickoff and John Lindquist,
and shot-putter Pete Dendrinos.

FLYING LOW . . . Bump Elliott, Michigan wingb ack, zooms into Northwestern's Jules Siegle. Com-
ing up fast to help Elliott are Wolverines Len Ford (87), Ralph Kohl (76), Al Wistert (11),v and
Quent Sickles (61).
Eleven Lettermen To Bolster Track Team
As Doherty PrimesSquad for Indoor Meets

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