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October 18, 1947 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-10-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

18, 1947 -

THE MICHWAS

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PAGE FIVE

Primts yiven
To University
By. Alunnus
Another boost has been given to
the University Student Print Loan
Collection begun this fall.
Col. Thomas M. Spaulding,
Class of '02, has contributed 23
prints to increase the collection to
the 500 mark. The prints donated
by Col. Spaulding are of famous
paintings at the National Gallery
of Art in Washington D. C. In-
cluded in the group are works by
Degas, Reynolds, DeHooch, and
Rembrandt.
Col. Spaulding, who served as
the head of the Adjutant Gen-
eral's Office in Washington dur-
ing the war, is an old friend of the
University. He has contributed
103 incunabula to the General Li-
brary, as well as 2,205 books to the
Stephen Spaulding Collection, es-
tablished in memory of his son,
who died while a student at the
University in 1927.
A Stephen Spaulding Scholar-
ship has also been established
from the gift of funds belonging
to Col. Spaulding's son.
The prints contributed by Col.
Spaulding will be available for
distribution at a date to be an-
nounced in the near future, Mrs.
Eloise Wilkinson, director of the
print library said.
A few printsare available for
distribution at the present time,
however.

Soviet Crops
Near Pre-War
Level--Gilmore
High Totals Predicted
In Industrial Output
By EDDY GILMORE
MOSCOW Oct. 17--()-Offi-
cial crop announcements indicate
that the Soviet Union, steadily
strengthening its economic ties
with some other nations, is going
to have a large amount of goods
with which to trade and deal this
year.
Official reports give this pic-
ture:
1. The grain crop is the best
since before the war.
2. Sugar beet production is way
up and the Ukraine is expected
this year to regain its position as
the world leader in beet sugar.
3. The tobacco crop is fine-
the best since before the war and
perhaps the best on record.
4. The cotton crop appears ex-
cellent, certainly the best since be-
fore the German invasion.
5. Russia hardly ever has seen
so many potatoes.
6. The tea plantations of the
far south, considerably expanded,
have produced bumper crops.
7. The fish industry has report-
ed record catches and with the
fish-canning industry restored
and built-up, there should be an
abundance of fish and sea food in
the U.S.S.R. this year.
Soviet newspapers have esti-
mated the 1947 wheat harvest at
about 44,000,000 tons.
In addition to these highly es-
sential agricultural items the
Russian people are given these as-

WASHINGTON, Oct. 17-(E)-
James F. Byrnes opened the
lid a bit further tonight on se-
cret Roosevelt - Churchill cor-
respondence to show that the
British agreed in 1944 to let Rus-
sia have "a largely preponderant
voice" in Romania and Bulgaria.
In return, his evidence showed,
Britain was to "have the freedom
to save Greece.
A foreign office spokesman re-
plying to British criteism of his
book, "Speaking Frankly," was
"incorrect" in stating that Britain
and Russia agreed to set up
spheres of influence in the Balk-
ans. with Greece in the British or-
bit and Romania in the Soviet or-
bit..
Byrnes declared tonight that
the foreign office spokesman who
said there was only a military
strategy agreement "evidently.ar
is not informed."
"My statement, Byrnes said,
was based on a message from
Prime Minister Churchill to
President Roosevelt dated March
8, 1945.

GUARD PLANE WRECKED ON PIKE'S PEAK-This Iowa National Guard plane, lost in a blinding
storm, crashed on Pike's Peak, 60 miles past its destination in Denver, Colo. Rescuers struggled
through waist-deep snow to rescue the four survivors. Three persons were killed in the crash.

SPress Club Sponsors Meeting
Of State Newspaper Editors

SNAKES AT COURTHOUSE-George Washington Hensler, Har-
lan, Ky., handles snake atop monument at courthouse in Harlan
when members of the "Faith Healers" sect won in one court ruling,
lost another, under Kentucky law banning public handling of
snakes.

.!

UNUSUAL
CHRISTMAS CARDS J
(NOW ON DISPLAY)
Imported tea (from India and o
China), jewelry, linen, copper,
brass, also handmade leather V
bags.
0
aJnia.JArtSop
Across from the Arcade - 330 MAYNARD STREET

Ike' Seen as '48
GOP Possibility
WASHINGTON, Oct. 17-(R)-
S nAtn Brufa t-o ~ia

An estimated 150 newspaper edi-
tors from throughout the state are
expected to attend the 30th an-
nual meeting of the University
Press Club slated to get underway
Nov. 6.
The two-day affair will feature
a discussion of the question of
armament and peace, constitu-
tional revision in Michigan and
some problems in higher educa-
tion.1
After the two-day meeting
packed with business sessions and
discussions the editors will relax
at the Wolverine-Indiana football
battle as guests of the Board in
Control of Athletics.
Notables slated to address the

oenauo brews~er t± ep", mam') surances concerning the health of
today quoted General Douglas the national economy:
MacArthur as saying that if a Coal and steel production are
General ever runs for election swelling..
against President Truman, it will Restored, rebuilt and modern-
be General Dwight D. Eisenhower ized, the oil and gasoline industry
The Maine senator told report- has made fine strides and its pro-
ers it happened in the summer of duction totals should be very high
1946 in 1947.

TYPEWRITERS
Office and Portable Models
of all makes
Bought,
Rented,
Repaired,
STATIONERY & SUPPLIES
0. D. MORRILL
314 South State St.
G. I. Requisitions Accepted

Sigler, President Alexander Ruth-
yen, Free Press Publisher John
Knight, and several other promi-
nant newsmen.

-1

Health Instr[ctor
Takes Field [Tip
Miss Patricia M. Walsh, instruc-
tor in public health nursing at the
University began a two-week field
trip yesterday to observe student
programs for public health nurses
at universities and field agencies.

!. l A .

editors include Governor

Kim

You Can Lose
Unwanted Pounds and Inches
just where you want them off;
no diets, drugs, medicines or
back breaking exercises,
Harold M. Baskin
Physio Therapist
8 N. Normal St. Phone 2410
YPSILANTI

U Graduate
Is Air Counsel
New General Counsel for the
Department of Air Forces is
Brackley Shaw, '34, '38L, a former
city editor of the Michigan Daily.
Shaw, while a student at the
University, was affiliated withr
Sigma Phi, Sigma Delta Chi,
Sphinx and Barristers, and a
member of the Union Executive
Council.

editors include Governor Kim
II

PLAN A CAREER
IN RETAILING
One-year Course
for College Graduates
i
t-r RE
UN

* Prepare to step into a responsible
executive position in the retailing field:
buying, advertising, fashion, personnel.
Specialized training, exclusively for col-
lege graduates, covers merchandising,
personnel management, textiles, store
organization, sales promotion, and all
phases of store activity. Realistic ap-
proach under store-trained faculty.
Classes are combined with paid store
work. Students are usually placed be-
fore graduation. Co-educational. Mas-
ter's degree. Approved by Veterans
Administration. Four full-tuition schol-
arships available. Limited enrollment,
apply early. Write for Bureau Bulletin C.

AUTO LOANS
For easy, convenient terms

see the

IR -I

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ANN unon BANK
101 SoUTH MAIN 330 SOUTH STATE
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

ESEARCH BUREAU FOR RETAIL TRAINING
IVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH * Pittsburgh 13, Pa.
* ..

k k t k r *

Ili

_ _ _ ___._
(1

(Continued from Page 4)

I

the Student Center. Election
officers.

of

NOW ON SALE

"YOUR YEARBOOK"

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alfred Scheips, Pastor
(The Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Mis-
souri, Ohio, and Other States)
9:45 and 11:00 A.M.--Services, with sermon
by the pastor, "Transient Opportunity."
4:00 P.M. - Sunday afternoon discussion
hour, led by the pastor.
5:30 P.M.-Supper meeting of Gamma Del-
ta, Lutheran Student Club.
7:00 P.M. Wednesday-Chapel Choir Prac-
tice.
4:15 P.M. Thursday-Coffee Hour.
6:00 P.M. Friday-Married Couples Dinner.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M.-Adult Study Group-"Some Case
Histories in Psychiatry and Religion."
11:00 .A.M.-Service of Worship. Edward H.
Redman preaching on "Can One Be More
Than Christian?"
6:00 P.M.-Vesper Service. Sermon: "Ac-
tions Taken. by Unitarians at Washington."
7:00 P.M.-Unitarian Student Group. Snack
Supper. Discussion.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
For National Lutheran Council Students
1304 Hill St.
Henry O. Yoder, pastor
9:10-10:45 A.M.-Bible Hour at the Center.
10:30 A.M.-Worship Services in Trinity and
Zion Lutheran Churches.
11:00 A.M.-Worship Service in Christ Lu-
theran Chapel, Willow Run.
5:30 P.M.-L.S.A. Meeting in Zion Lutheran
Parish Hall. Program following supper-
play, "The Trial of Miss L.S.A."
7:30-8:30 P.M. Tuesday-Review of cate-
chism at Center.
4:00-4:30 P.M. Wednesday-Tea and Coffee
. Hour at the Center.
Note-Hay-Ride on Saturday night-meet at
Center-- promptly at 8: 00.

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division at Catherine
The Rev. Henry Lewis, S.T.D., Rector
The Rev. John M. Shufelt, Curate
The Rev. John H. Burt, Student Chaplain
Miss Maxine J. Westphal,
Student Counsellor
Mr. George R. Hunsce,
Organist and Choirmaster
8:00 A.M.-Holy Communion.
9:45 A.M.--High School Classes.
11:00 A.M.-Junior Church.
11:00 A.M.-Morning Prayer. Sermon by Mr.
Shufelt.
5:30 P.M. - Canterbury Club Supper and
Discussion, Student Center.
8:00 P.M.-Choral Evening Prayer. Sermon
by Mr. Burt.
7:15 A.M. Wednesday - Holy Communion
(followed by breakfast at Student Center.
Reservations, 2-4097).
4:00-6:00 P.M. Friday-Open House, Student
Center.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Minister, Rev. Leonard A. Parr, D.D.
Student Work-Rev. H. L. Pickerill, Miss
Jean Goree.
9:30 and 10:45 A.M.-Church School Depart-
ments.
10:45 A.M.-Annual Laymen's Sunday. Serv-
ice to be conducted by laymen of the
church. The morning address "The Chris-
tian's Attitude in these Times," Dr. Dwight
C. Long.
6:00 P.M.-Congregational - Disciples Guild
supper. Worship by Don Palmer. Speaker,
Reverend James Mead, Jackson. Subject,
"Lifts for Living."
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan
F. E. Zendt, Minister to Congregation
Mr. Howard Farrar, Choir Director
10:50 A.M.-Morning Worship. Nursery for
children during the service.
GUILD HOUSE, 438 Maynard Street
H. L. Pickerill, Minister to Students
Jean Garee, Assistant in Student Work
6:00 P.M.-Guild Sunday evening hour. The
Congregational-Disciples Guild will meet
at the Congregational Church to hear Rev-
erend James Mead from Jackson speak on
"Lifts for Living" following the supper.

First Unitarian Church:
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 a.m., Adult Study Group,
"Some Case Histories in Psychia-
try and Religion."
11:00 a.m., Service of Worship,
"Can One Be More Than Chris-
tian?" Rev. E. H. Redman.
6:00 p.m., Vesper Service. Ser-
mon: "Actions Taken by Unita-
rians at Washington."
7:00 p.m., Unitarian Student
Group. Snack Supper. Discus-
sion.
First Church of Christ, Scientist:
Michigan League Ballroom.
Sunday morning service at
10:30. Subject "Doctrine of Atone-
ment."
Sunday School at 11:45.
Wednesday evening service at 8
p.m.
The Ann Arbor Meeting of the
American Society of Friends will
meet regularly Sunday morning
at 11:00 in the Unitarian Church
at the corner of Washtenaw and
Berkshire. All friends and friends-
of-friends are invited.

Your Pict ure is inthep48 Ensian
(pronounced NCN)

$ 1 Down

The 448-Page Ensign is New from

Cover to Cover

See

Your House or Dorm Representative

for FREE Page Plan

I,"

I

I

For the BEST
MORNING
PROGRAMS
on the air
61

This is EVERYBODY'S Yearbook-
FRESHMEN, SOPHOMORES, JUNIORS,

as well

as Seniors.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw
W. P. Lemon, D.D., and James Van Pernis,
Ministers
Frieda Op't Holt Vogan, Director of Music
10:45 A.M.-Morning Worship. Dr. Lemon's
sermon topic : "Between Humans."

I'

11

NOTE:

All Orders Must be made in

Advance due to

Paper Shortage and Printing Costs.

LBuy Now

If

I _ u - 1

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III

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