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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 18, 1947 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-10-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


THE MICHIGXN DH.AHY

-S'ATURDAYOTBR1&-97;

NSA Granted
Membership,
In UNESCO

f},
.

Move Will Increase
StudentCooperation
The newly formed National Stu-
dent Association has been ad-
mitted to membership in the Na-
tional Commission for UNESCO
(United Nations Economic, Sci-
entific, and Cultural Organiza-
tions), it was announced yesterday
by the national office of NSA
in Madison, Wisconsin.
The NSA was organized last
summer at a constitutional con-
vention held in Madison, to which
the University sent ten represen-
tatives.
Robert P. Smith, vice-president
of NSA, will be the representative
of the association to the UNESCO
Commission. Smith is also serv-
ing as chairman of the Inter-
national Activities Commission of
NSA, which is located at Harvard
University.
The 26 regional chairmen of
NSA, chosen from delegates at the
recent convention in Madison, will
coordinate their efforts with those
of regional UNESCO committees
to implement the programs of the
National Commission for UNES-
CO.
Among projects now being de-
veloped is direct student exchange
between Canadian and U.S. uni-
versities. Special travel and study
tours are being formulated for
American students in Europe next
summer, and plans are also being
made to enable students from for-
eign countries to tour the U.S.
These plans are in line with
the NSA's purpose of providing
a means by which American stu-
dentscan help to create better
understanding between peoples all
over the world and thus further
the ideal of a world community.
Read and Use
The Daily Classifieds

ACTIVITY IN THE WHEAT PIT-With future delivery wheat hitting $3.05 a bushel, brokers' clerks
use hand signals in trading on the floor of the Chicago Board of Trade. The broker in the center
with finger upraised is bidding one-eighth of a cent above the last sale price.

RECALL 'UNCLE SHYLOCK':
British Weigh Interest on American Loan

{

By J. M. ROBERTS JR.
AP Foreign Affairs Analyst I
Judging by the tone of the Lon-!
don weekly newspapers yesterday,
some Britishers seem to feel they
are being very magnanimous in
not requiring the United States
to pay them interest on what they
owe us. It is reminiscent of the
time when European talk about
"Uncle Shylock" was a major fac-
tor in the spread of isolationism
here.
The New Statesman, and No-

1 tion's criticism of U. S. slowness
on relief is one thing, it being , a
leftist sheet anyway. But the
Economist, a middle of the road
organ not only criticizes but also
threatens not to repay the loans.
"When the time comes," it com-
ments, "all the debtor has to do is
insist on offering goods, not gold
or capital or territory, and the
creditor will ask for a moratorium.
... It is doubtful that the Ameri-
can public would allow Congress
to refuse to lend abroad."
'Spectator' Comments
The conservative Spectator says
"For America to attach political

+ Classified Advertising +

FOR RENT
HALF OF DOUBLE ROOM. Twin beds.
Shower, walking distance to ,cam-
pus. Phone 2-2887. )30
WANTED TO RENT
GRADUATE STUDENT and parents
want two rooms and kitchenette. See
W. J. Clark at League. )72
WANTED
URGENTLY needed. Two tickets to
Minnesota game. I've invited guests
and can't find tickets. Please help
me. Phone Audrey. 9787. ) 69
WANTED to purchase two or more tick-
ets for Minnesota game. Call Claude
Batuk, 5400 after 7:00 p.m. )74
WANTED TO BUY 2 tickets to the
Minnesota game. Scalpers need not
apply. Call 2-7661. ) 71
WANTED up to 8 tickets, in pairs, for
Michigan-Minnesota game. Telephone
25-8714. )42
BOARD for remainder' of fall term
desired by Grad student. Phone 2-
0197 evenings. )2
HELP WANTED
MALE HELP WANTED. Someone who
is not satisfied with their present
earnings who would like a better
job and a better salary. Phone 8296.
Sunday or Wednesday, 8 to 1. )67
DANCE BAND-Competent piano men
with experience needed for campus
dance band. Call Lee Stewart. 2-8450.
)57
LAUNDRESS to do linen and personal
laundry. Phone 23279, Collegiate Sor-
osis. )46
SHOE SALESMAN-Part-time. Experi-
enced in ladies' shoes, afternoons and
Saturdays. Will arrange hours as to
classes and football games. Apply to
Bill Carman Shoe Salon at Randall's
306 S. State. )68
WANTED-Men or women pinsetters at
Women's Athletic Building bowling
alleys. Evenings 7:00-9:00. Call Marge
Dangel, 2-4561 after 4:00. )70
BUSINESS SERVICES
STUDENT WASHING and IRONING by
experienced laundress. Phone 5193.
)62
HORSES BOARDED. $30 - $40. The
Hackamore. 3351 N. Maple Rd. Phone
25-8207. )24
BY ESTABLISHED tradition we do all
types of sewing, alterations, formal
restyling. Hildegarde Sewing Shop.
116 E. Huron. Phone 24669. )29
HOOVER SPECIALIST, SERVICE and
sales. Buy through Goodyear store.
For service call A. A. 2-0298. W. O.
Taylor, 1612 Brooklyn, Ann Arbor.)32,
INDIA MOTORCYCLE SALES now do-
ing business in its new location. Serv-
ice on all makes. Reasonable prices.
207 W. Liberty. Phone 2-1748. )6

LOST AND FOUND
LOST-K & E Slide Rule, Peter Muller
stamped on brown leather case.
Finder please notify Audrey Muller,
telephone 29561. )60
WRISTWATCH-German make "Jung-
hans" area between West Medical
and corner South University and
Forest. Half of brown leather strap
missing. Contact O. W. Neuhaus. 4121
Ext. 389. Reward. )5
GLASSES in brown case. Lost last
Thursday. Reward. Call J. Stevens
22591. ) 8
TOOK wrong gray gabardine topcoat at
P-Bell Friday. Yours has been re-
turned to Bell. Please leave mine
there. )52
LOST: Black Eversharp fountain pen,
minus clip, between E. University
and Church on South University. Call
C. Lash. 2-3225. )57
.FOUND-Unknown rider left typewriter
in my car. Robert Copp, 1337 Enfield
Ct., Willow Run. )43
LOST: Slide rule, yellow case. Charles
Coale stamped *on side. Write Box
3, Michigan Daily. Reward. )18
DARK SHELL-RIMMED GLASSES lost
Wednesday, second floor,. Women's
Room, Angell Hall.. Reward. Call
9322. )47
FOUND, one Parker pen. Stamped with
name "Judy Babbitt". Contact Carol
1050 Natural Science. )14
FOR SALE
1940 OLDS CLUB coupe. Radio, heater,
and good tires. In good mechanical
conditnon. $950 cash. See Bill McCop-
pin at 536 Thompson. )19
MEN'S USED clothing bought and sold
at Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington.
)45
TABLECLOTHS, aprons, bridge table
covers, colorful paterns in dirt-proof
plastic. Ideal for gifts. 2-4270, eve-
nings. ) 38
BRAND NEW mahogany spinet piano
with full keyboard. Call at 1009 Har-
wick Ct., Willow Run Village, between
seven and ten p.m. )73
FOR SALE-$25 single-player TRA-
VELLER phonograph. Cost $40 new.
Good tone, good shape. Ted Liss. 6539.
)48
BRAND NEW Millen transmitter-ex-
citer with tubes, and National FBXA
short-ware receiver. Sell or trade for
35mm. camera. Fred Remley, 202
Michigan House. 2-4401. )21
"SILVER KING" TROMBONE with
case. Recently overhauled. Excellent
playing condition. Call Jack, 2-7293,
1037 Olivia. )75
BLACK TAILS, size 36-37, complete
outfit, shirt, vest, collars, $35. A bar-
gain. Phone Ypsi, 3143J-1 collect. )53
STOP LOOKING! Here's the car you
want - 1940 Ford convertible. Call
Al, 4211. )12
JAVA SPARROWS, society, strawberry,
and zebra finches, canaries, and para-
keets. 562 South 7th, phone 5330. )40
ONE cabinet model radio, one table
model combination, one cabinet mod-
el combination. Call 4489. )15
Cii

Honor Detroit
Student Paper
Eastern, Holland
High Win Awards
EAST LANSING, Oct. 17-B-
Student newspapers from Detroit
Eastern and Holland High Schools
took top honors at the first an-
nual high school journalism pro-
gram at Michigan State College
today.
The Indian, Detroit Eastern
High paper, was designated the
outstanding high school paper in
all classes. The Holland High Her-
ald was given a special service
award for distinguished service to
the community.
Presentation of awards was
made at a noon luncheon. C.
Yates McDaniel, Detroit Bureau
Chief of the Associated Press, was
the luncheon speaker.
Detroit Eastern also took top
honors in the class A division and
Eastern High writers won three
of four places in the individual
divisions. Class B honors went to
the Breeze, of Albion High School;
Class C to the Amplifier of Sag-
inaw St. Andrew High School, and
Class D to the Breeze of Port
Austin High School.
Pollock Confers
Prof. James K. Pollock of the
political science department will
leave 'for Washington today to at-
tend the second meeting of the
Committee for Organization of the
Executive Branch starting Mon-
day.
The committee was established
by Congress at the last session.
Prof. Pollock was appointed to the
group by Senator Vandenberg. He
will remain in Washington till
Wednesday.

or economic conditions of any
kind to whatever assistance she
may extend to this country and
others would be altogether im-
proper.'"
Is that any way to try to sell
America on the idea that Europe
is a good risk?
Europe has qualified for aid
under the Marshall Plan only by
the skin of its teeth and American
acceptance of some very tenuous
promises.
Hard To Convince
We almost had to drive into
their heads with a maul the fact
that even our resourcesnare lim-
ited and that they were not being
invited merely to tell us what they
needed, but also that they had
to make a wartime-like drive of
their own. There is still strong
doubt in this country that they
really will do it.
In the light of all this, it is hard
to understand why even a part of
the British press would try to
make things harder for a Wash-
ington administration which is
working night and day to relieve
them, even to the point of skating
over some prettydthin legal ice.
We have to do it, even at the
expenseofethe highest living costs
in our history and at the risk of
permanently damaging our farm
soil and critically depleting our
natural resources. We know that
our reasons are not entirely hu-
manitarian. But nobody likes tc
give a handout and get back a
"thank you, sucker."
IRA Membership
Campaign Planned
The Inter-Racial Association
will hold a second membershiip
campaign next Monday and Tues
day.
A booth will be set up on the
diagonal for registering new mem
bers.
In its attempt to fight discrim
ination wherever it appears, the
IRA will sponsor a program thi
semester which will include talk
and discussions by Dr. W. E. B
DuBois, Prof. Theodore Newcomb
Prof. Mischa Titiev, Prof. Prestor
Slosson, The Christian-Jewisi
Round Table, and Anne Shore o
the Civil Rights Congress.
The group will send testing
committees into local restaurant
to investigate reports of refusa
to serve Negroes, will publish
bi-monthly bulletin on inter-racia
affairs, contribute to the Anti
Lynch Fund; and investigate al
leged- quota systems in profes
sional schools.

State Schools
Greatly Need
New Buildings~
Legislature's Laxity1
Cited by M1Iochdman
Michigan's legislature must re-
lieve the state's dire shortage of
suitable public school buildings
that has resulted from 16 years of
depression and war, according to
Prof. Arthur B. Moehlman of the
education school.
Writing in the School of Edu-
cation Bulletin, Prof. Moehlman
declares that thousands of chil-
dren are housed in instructionally
obsolescent and structurally dan-
gerous schools. He further asserts
that the need is so great that
only funds regularly appropriated
by the state legislature for new
buildings will alleviate the situa-
tion.
"The daily exposure of both
children and teachers to serious
physical danger from unprotected
fire hazards would quickly force
parental action if most boards
of education had not adopted a
policy of withholding facts for
fear of creating panic," Prof.
Moehlman writes.
From 1939 to 1945, the average
annual expenditure for replace-
ments and new school buildings
was slightly over five million dol-
lars, the writer points out.
To catch up with the backlog,
a minigpum of twenty millions
should be earmarked annually,
Prof. Moehlman declares. Even at
that rate, he adds, it will require
more than a decade to bring
Michigan's public school plant to
modern standards of efficiency
and safety.
Alumna Given
Post as Dean
Newly-appointed Dean of Finch
Junior College in New York City,
is Sadyebeth Heath Lowitz, a Uni-
versity graduate.
r Mrs. Lowitz, a former Daily
staff member, is the co-author of
nine books and numerous articles
1for young people.
In her capacity as dean, Mrs.
Lowitz declared, "It shall be my
goal to tailor-make for each stu-
dent a special program designed
to help develop her potentialities
as fully as possible."
Mrs. Lowitz, a member of Kap-
pa Kappa Gamma, received her
M.A. iIa education at Columbia
University after her graduation
from Michigan.
Sigler Gets Ten-Gallon
Hat;fron Texas Admirer
LANSING, Oct. 17--(R)-To his
t already dazzling array of hats,
Governor Sigler today added a
fawn-colored modified Texas ten-
gallon model.
It was presented to him by John
Ben Shepperd of Texas, president
of the United States Junior Cham-
ber of Commerce.
Shepperd stopped in Lansing to-
day on his tour of 24 states to
promote what he called the "Fifth
Freedom-freedom of opportunity
of enterprise."

By LIDA DAILESt
Streptomycin, hailed by pop-'
ular science writers as the "won-
der" cure for tubeiculosis, is rated
by the University Hospital Tuber-
culosis Unit research workers ast
a valuable diug, but definitely not
a panacea; its effectiveness hav-
ing been demonstrated experimen-
Sell Newman
Club Tickets
Dinner, Dance, Set
For Honieco ining
A limited number of student
tickets to the Newman Club
Homecoming buffet supper and
dance scheduled for 6 p.m. Friday
is now available at the club rooms
below St. Mary's Chapel.
The supper will be followed by a
varied program of entertainment
including the first public appear-
ance of the Chapel Choir this year.
Dancing will continue until
midnight in the midst of decora-
tions emphasizing t h e Little
Brown Jug and Welcome Alumni
themes.
Student tickets will continue to
be sold after masses Sunday until
the entire supply is gone.
Riding Clubs Hold
Combined Show
Crop and Saddle and Boots and
Spurs, local riding clubs, will
sponsor their annual horseshow
at 1 p.m. today at Golfside Sta-
bles.
The horseshow will be open to
all. No admission is charged.
Transportation to the stable will
be provided for those who wish it.
A station wagon will pick up spec-
tators from 12:30 to 1 p.m. today
in front of the Women's Athletic
Building.
The Crop and Saddle cup and
ribbons will be awarded in vari-
ous classes. Dr. J. R. Shipman
will be judge of the show and Mr.
Clarence Hastings is to be ring-
master.

EFFECTIVE IN EARLY STAGES:
'U' Says Streptonycin Not a Cure-All

tally only in the early stages and
in certain types of the disease.
'he Tuberculosis Unit. in con-
juion wit thc Pabury Sani:
tariurln, the U« nited S tates Public
Health Service and the American
Trudeau Society, has conducted
research in streptomycin since the
fall of 1946.
The patients selected for this
research were all people with early
tuberculosis. Early cases may have
reached the advanced stage be-
cause the patient's resistance to
the disease was poor.
Three-Month Treatment
Th4 sri'eptonycin treatment
takes approximately three months
and consists of intramuscular in-
jections in the hips. It usually
takes two months or longer be-
fore the patient responds and dur-
ing this time it is not known if
there will be a favorable reaction.
Patients with early pulmonaryl
tuberculosis respond uniformly fa-
vorably and there have been no
examples of progression during
the treatment
Tubeirculosis bronchitis, tuber-
culosis of the larynx, lymphi nodes
S- Last Times Today
"VIGILANTES
RETURN"
-- STARTS SUNDAY - --

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and intestinal tract apparently
respond satisfactorily to strepto-
mycin treatment. Streptomycin is
of promising value in the treat-
ment of tuberculosis meningitis
and of questionable value in tu-
berculosis of the bones and joints,
kidneys. and urinary tract,
Toxic Effect
However, streptomycin has defi-
nite toxic effects in certain indi-
viduals. Patients who could get
well by the conventional forms of
therapy should probably not re-
ceive the streptomycin treatment.
Because streptomycin, thus far,
is not valuable when used on pa-
tients who have long-standing
cases of tuberculosis, research is
still being carried on to find other
anti-biotics to be used in place
of or in conjunction with the drug.
The Tuberculosis Unit research
workers feel that the emphasis
should be placed on the early
diagnosis of the disease, which
they feel is still the most effective
way of combatting tuberculosis.

WAA Tryouts
Tryouts for the WAA Swim-
ming Club will be held from 9
to 11 a.m. today at the Union
Pool.
Dean Crawford To
Attend Yale Fete
Dean Ivan C. Crawford of the
engineering college, will repare-
sent the University at the celebra-
tion of the centenary of the Shef-
field School of Science at Yale
University today.
Monday and Tuesday he will be
in Chicago for the annual meeting
of the Society of Metals, and will
also address a meeting of Michi-
gan alumni there.

'

f

35c
until
5 P.M.
NOW
MICHIGAN

ii

Coming -
"KISS OF
DEATH"

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.
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SERVING HOURS:
11 A.M.-1:30 P.M. 5-7 P.M.
"Known for Good Food''
The TAVERN
CAFETERIA
338 Maynard Street

Patrice
MmUNSEL
CONCERT and
OPERA STAR

I4
(at efli apij''('eel
300 SEATS-NO WAITING
LIGHT LUNCH?
Home-made Soup ......................10
SA.M.Choice of Sandwiches .................20
Good Coffee, Cream ............... . 05
to .35
1:30 P.M. Tax..0
.36
OR, SOM ET HING HEAVIER UP TO A DINNER?
Salad..15 or .20
Roast Sirloin of Beef ...................60
Creamed Chicken, Biscuit...............55
Potatoes.. .....................10
5:00 P.M. Choice of Vegetables.................10
Roll and Butter. .................. .06
o Dessert....................12 or .15
7 :3 0 P .M . -Milk -. -.. .......-. ........... 09
1.25
Tax..................04
1.29

hl

.I

LA SOCIEDAD HISPANICA
Presents
QUE UNDO ES MICHOACAN!
(Mexican Musical Movie with English Titles)
TITO GUIZAR and GLORIA MARIN
Tues., and Wed., Oct. 21 and 22 - 8:30 P.M.
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
Box office opens at 2:00 P.M. Mon., Oct. 20th, 1947 Phone 6300
Admission - Fifty Cents (tax included)

i

---

HELP
WANTED

C IANDAN
COTTAGE INN
512 E. William -- Next to Campus Bike Shop

Patrice Munsel
SAT., OCT. 18,
8:30 P.M.
^1___0

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