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October 17, 1947 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-10-17

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PAGEO Tnr HMICHIAN IILY

F rDr Y, -OCTOBER 17, 3047

ANOTHER FRANKIE?
Unsought Bobby-Sox Appeal
Takes Crooner by Surprise

Joe Marine probably wouldn't
like to be called "The Frank Sina-
tra of the Pennsylvanians."
But the bobby-sox craze for Ma-
rine, who joined Fred Waring one
year ago has startled not only him,
but the more staid devotees of
Waring music.
Marine, who will appear with
Fred Waring and the Pennsylvan-
ians, Oct. 31 and Nov. 1 in Hill
Auditorium, sponsored by the
Men's Glee Club, had only a few
years of show business on his rec-
ord before he left for war duty.
Part of his singing experience was
obtained in the army before he
was shipped overseas.
Originally, Marine sang only ro-
City Officials Meet Here
To Discuss Sanitation
Adaptation of war-born meth-
ods of garbage and refuse disposal
will be emphasized at a gathering
of public works and other city of-
ficials from all over the country
Oct. 27 and 28, at the University
public health school.
The meeting "probably will be
the first of its kind ever held in
the U. S.," Harry E. Miller, lec-
turer in public health engineering
and' sanitation at the University,
said.

mantic ballads, but he has learned
to vary his presentation with the
Pennsylvanians. He was hired by
Waring one year ago, just after he
?iad returned from a long stretch
in the Army.
* * *

International
Food Sharing
Plan Is Seen
Morgenthau Proposes
Adoption of FDR Idea
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON, Oct. 16-Henry
Morgenthau, Jr. says the world
must "think in terms of an inter-
national food stamp plan" so that
"hungry nations can draw on
glutted nations, just as Harry
Hopkins' reliefers drew upon Hen-
ry Wallace's farmers."
The former secretary of the
treasury, writing in Collier's Mag-
azine, told how in 1938 he called
for Eleanor Roosevelt's aid when
Wallace and Hopkins opposed his
plan to distribute surplus food to
the needy.
"My first step," Morgenthau
wrote, "was to call Tom Parran,
the surgeon general, and ask
him what our dietary deficiencies
were. The big ones, he said, were
in, green vegetables, citrus fruits
and dairy products. Parran sug-
gested feeding the excess grain to
cattle in order to increase the milk
supply."
The Treasury Department
worked out a plan on this basis,
Morgenthau said, but "to my dis-
may, Wallace opposed the plan."
Morgenthau wrote that Wallace
felt the plan "would immediately
run into a jam with the corn belt.
Very bad politics!"
Morgenthau said he then called.
Mrs. Roosevelt, told her 90,000
families were hungry in Chicago
and that Wallace opposed his
plan.
Mrs. Roosevelt, he said, told him
the hungry must be cared for, and
promised to "ask Franklin about it
tonight."
"From then on," Morgenthau
added, "the President was sympa-
thetic."

t vyns To Speak*I
"Trends in the Selection of
Professional Personnel" will be the
topic of a lecture by Dr. David G.
Ryans, associate director of Amer-
ican Council on Education, to be
given at 4:15 p.m. Tuesday in
Rackham Amphitheatre.
The lecture will be sponsored by
the Bureau of Psychological Serv-
ices and the education school, and
is open to the public.
Informal Dance ... ,
Informal record dancing for
foreign students and their
American friends will be held at
8 p.m. today in the Interna-
tional Center.
* * *
Urbanism Lecture . *.
Professor Pierre Lavedan of the
Department of History of Art at
the Sorbonne in Paris will lecture
in French on the subject "Con-
temporary Problems of Urbanism
in France" at 4:15 p.m. Monday,
in the Rackham Amphitheatre.
Professor Lavedan, who is a
member of the staff of the Ecole
des Beaux Arts in Paris served as
editor of a classical dictionary of
Greek and Roman mythology,
published in France in 1931. He
has written a history of urbanism
and several other books on art
and architecture.
* I *
Student Tour *...
A tour through the Kaizer-
Frazer plant will be conducted
today for 46 foreign students to
acquaint them with the mass
production methods of Ameri-
can automobile production.
The tour is part of, a series
planned by the International
Center to give foreign students a

Campus Highlights

better understanding of the life
and culture of the United
States.
* * *
MCF MeeiIg ..M
"Christianiy is Practical" is the
topic of a talk to be presented by
Bob Finley Chicago University di-
vinity student, at 7:30 p.m. today
in Lane H611 under the auspices of
Michigan Christian Fellowship.
The meeting will be open to all
students.
Guild if ir1k Party
Roger Williams Guild will
have a work party at 8:30 p.m.
today at the Guild II.use.
Plans for the evening include
stuffing toy animals for Christ-
mas 1o°es to be sent to Europe
and painting the chairs and
walls of the recreation room.
Coffee Hou .
Association Coffee Hour will be
held at 4:30 p.m. today at Lane
Hall. All students are welcome.
r *
SR A Discussion
SRA Saturday Luncheon Dis-
cussion Group will meet at 12:15
tomorrow to hear Dr. Franklin
Littell speak on "Should Labor
Be Curbed." All students inter-
ested should make reservations
by calling Lane Hall by 10 a.m.
tomorrow
* * *

young Pleads
For Industrial
Camaraderie
Arthur Young, former vice-
president in charge of industrial
relations for the United States
Steel Corporation, said in an ad-
dress here yesterday that "If in-
dustrial relations are to improve,
we must re-establish the era of
camaraderie that once existed be-
tween management and labor."
To bring about this condition,
Young added that we must adhere
to two Biblical principles in our
industrial relations, those prin-
ciples being, "Do unto others as
you would have others do unto
you" and "He among you who will
be greatest, let him be the servant
of all."
Young attributed America's
high standard of living and great
productivity to the cooperation
between labor and management,
and he declared, "Labor and man-
agement and their leaders must
concern themselves with further-
ing this attitude of cooperation."
Commenting on the new Taft-
Hartley labor bill, Young declared
that the evils of the Wagner Act
of 1935 are done away with.
Whereas the Wagner Act was uni-
lateral in that it applied only to
wrongs committed by employers,
the Taft-Hartley bill covers em-
ployees as well as employers.

USSR NEEDS GOODS:
Increased Soviet Production
Will Not Aid World Shortages
By J. M. ROBERTS, JR. against the Marshall Plan. So far,
AP Foreign Affairs Analyst howeershe has been en-
The eUh however, she has been mainly en-
TUogaged in taking food from some of
increasing production has given them in the form of reparations
her a large amount of goods with and giving it to others for one
which to trade and deal this year concession or ainother. Czecho-
can be taken with a grain of salt slovakia is now being paid with
and, even if entirely true, would Bulgarian and Rumanian wheat
mean no easing of general world i for her last minute "decision" to
shortages. stay away from the Paris Eco-
nomic Conference.
She may use it to trade and At the same time an American-
deal (and thereby continue her licensed Berlin newspaper asks
own people on their accustomed when the Bolsheviks are going to
level of shortage) but you can rest stop taking food from hungry Ger-
assured that nobody outside the many and start carrying their
Soviet sphere will get any real share of the relief load.
benefit from it.
Russia's great publicity play on
her good crops obviously is de-
signed to convince her satellites in
Eastern Europe that they are on
the right side of the fence in
sticking ° with the Communists

SH ORT WAVE

JOE MARINE
... to sing here

Patrice
MmUNSEL

Strike Cancels Exhibit
Scheduled for Museum
"Competition for Printed Fab-
rics," the exhibition scheduled for
display in the University's Muse-
um of Art Oct. 7-26, has been can-
celled because of the Railway Ex-
press strike in New York, Miss
Helen Hall,"curator, said.
The curirenit exhibit of modern
handmade jewelry will be shown
through Sui'iday, she said.
Continuous from 1 P.M.

+ Classified Advertising +

TRANSPORTATION

Also -
"ARROW MAGIC"
HOLLYWOOD
WONDERLAND
SCREEN SNAPSHOTS
WORLD NEWS
Coming Sunday
"BRUTE
FORCE"

i

I

7ihe ,fejt Akealin Teton!*
TONITE
and every Sunday, Wednesday and Friday nite why not stop in
for those Sandwiches and Malts where there's Free Informal
Dancing to the music of TOM McNALL'S ORCHESTRA featur-
ing vocals by JACKIE WARD. Just a step from the Campus
Theatres
THE NEW COLLEGE CLUB
Minimum: 50c per person
Sunday: from 7 Wednesday and Friday: from 8:30

DRIVING to New York City October
19th. Two passengers to share ex-
penses. Occupant 1162 Ware Court,
Willow Run. )-69
DRIVING TO EVANSTON Saturday?
Will share driving and expenses. Call
Hugh Kennedy, 2-6692, 1001 Forest.)36
LOST AND FOUND
GLASSES in brown case. Lost last
Thursday. Reward. Call J. Stevens
22591. )81
TOOK wrong gray gabardine topcoat at
P-Bell Friday. Yours has been re-
turned to Bell. Please leave mine
there. )52
LOST: Black Eversharp fountain pen,
minus clip, between E. University
and Church on South University. Call
C. Lash. 2-3225. )57
FOUND-Unknown rider left typewriter
in my car. Robert Copp, ;1337 Enfield
Ct., Willow Run. )43
LOST: Slide rule, yellow case. Charles
Coale stamped on side. Write Box
3, Michigan Daily. Reward. )18
LOST Friday, Football Ticket Sec. 25,
Row 59, Seat 12. Please call Kim 9027.
Reward. )73
LOST: Raincoat. Last Wednesday from
2215 Angell. Phone Ted K. at 2-7365
or return to English Office. )67
LOST-Lady's gold Bulova wrist watch.
Campus area. Call Jeanne Lindsey,
2-2281. Reward. )26
DARK SHELL-RIMMED GLASSES lost
Wednesday, second floor, Women's
Room, Angell Hall. Reward. Call
9322. )47
FOUND, one Parker pen. Stamped with
name "Judy Babbitt". Contact Carol
1050 Natural Science. )14
NEED a practice piano. Will pay rea-
sonably: Call 2-4621 6 to 7. )55
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-$25 single-player TRA-
VELLER phonograph. Cost $40 new.
Good tone, good shape. Ted Liss. 6539.
)48
BRAND NEW Millen transmitter-ex-
citer with tubes, and National FBXA
short-ware receiver. Sell or trade for
35mm. camera. Fred Remley, 202
Michigan House. 2-4401. )21
"SILVER KING" TROMBONE with
case. Recently overhauled. Excellent
playing condition. Call Jack, 2-7293,
1037 Olivia. )75
BLACK TAILS, size 36-37, complete
outfit, shirt, vest, collars, $35. A bar-
gain. Phone Ypsi, 3143J-1 collect. )53
STOP LOOKING! Here's the car you
want - 1940 Fordeconvertible. Call
Al, 4211. )12
ROYAL Portable typewriter, good con-
dition. Also two good used hotplates.
Call 2-7412, 12-1 p.m. )72;
ACCORDIAN, 4 shift Italian "Mores-
chi" for sale. Any reasonable offer
accepted. Phone 2-2366, 1-5 p.m. )5
JAVA SPARROWS, society, strawberry,
and zebra finches, canaries, and para-
keets. 562 South 7th, phone 5330. )40
GRAY flannel winter coat, medium size,
excellent condition.cCall 2-5631. Vir-
ginia Moore. )54
ONE cabinet model radio, one table
model combination, one cabinet mod-j
el combination. Cali 4489. )15
Conn tenor sax, gold lacquer, good con-
riitinn hnn ?.mia5 np n Rnt

WANTED
WANTED to purchase two oz. more tick-
ets for Minnesota game. Call Claude
Batuk, 5400 after 7:00 p.m. )743
WANTED TO BUY 2 tickets to the1
Minnesota game. Scalpers need not
apply. Call 2-7661. )71
WANTED up to 8 tickets, in pairs, for
Michigan-Minnesota game. Telephone
25,8714. - )42{
BOARD for remainder of fall term 1
desired by Grad student. Phone 2-t
0197 evenings. )2
WANTED TO RENT
OPPORTUNITY to house possible fu-
ture president of the United States-t
John McCarvel, Jr., age 6 months -
by renting an apartment, or houser
to his non-drinking, non-smoking'
parents, while his father, veteran and
senior law student completes hisf
course. Phone 2-6058 or write 501
Linden. )57S
HELP WANTED.
LAUNDRESS to do linen and personal
laundry. Phone 23279, Collegiate Sor-
osis. ) 46
SHOE SALESMAN-Part-time. Experi-
enced inladies' shoes, afternoons and
Saturdays. Will arrange hours as to
classes and football games. Apply to
Bill Carman Shoe Salon at Randall's
306 S. State. )68
WANTED-Men or women pinsetters at
Women's Athletic Building bowling
alleys. Evenings 7:00-9:00. Call Marge
Dangel, 2-4561 after 4:00. )70
BUSINESS SERVICES
STUDENT WASHING and IRONING by
experienced laundress. Phone 5193.
)62
HORSES BOARDED. $30 -$40. The
Hackamore. 3351 N. Maple Rd. Phone
25-8207. )24
BY ESTABLISHED tradition we do all
types of sewing, alterations, formal
restyling. Hildegarde Sewing Shop.
116 E. Huron. Phone 24669. )29
HOOVER SPECIALIST, SERVICE and
sales. Buy through Goodyear store.
For service call A. A. 2-0298. W. O.
Taylor, 1612 Brooklyn, Ann Arbor.)32
INDIA MOTORCYCLE SALES now do-
ing business in its new location. Serv-
ice on all makes. Reasonable prices.
207 W. Liberty. Phone 2-1748. )6

Wesleyan Gui .d . ..
Wesleyan Guild will have a
Sadie Hawkins party at 8 p.m. to-
night at the Methodist church.
Dungarees are in order for the
occasion.
Spanish Movie
To BeShown
Film Presented by
Sociedlad Hispanica
"Que Lindo Est Michoacan"
(How Beautiful Is Michoacan),
Latin-American movie with Eng-
lish sub-titles, will be shown Wed-
nesday and Thursday at Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre, under the
auspices of La Sociedad Hispanica.
Tenor Tito Guizar and dancer-
singer Gloria Marin head a cast
of Mexican actors and actresses in
renditions of the favorite songs
and dances of Mexico.
Michoacan, scene of the play, is
a state of Mexico touching on the
Pacific Coast.
"Que Lindo" is filmed against
the actual scenic Mexican back-
grounds, and shows the folk
.dances, customs and costumes,
and romantic flavor of the coun-
tryside.
Ticket sales will open at 2 p.m.
Monday, at the Lydia Mendels-
sohn box-office.
SERVING HOURS:
11 A.M.-1:30 P.M. 5-7 P.M.
"Known for Good Food"
The TAVERN
CAFETERIA
338 Maynard Street

1' , I

L.

4 r.
114 EAST WILLIAM CALL 7191
BEER
WINE - CHAMPAGNE - MIXERS r
CONVENIENT DRIVE-THRU SERVICE
30!!!!~~ f.iggggg

POLONIA PRANCE
Polonia Club Open House
for Students
Place-International Center
Date-Saturday, Oct. 18
Time-8:30 P.M.
Informal

11

for only $47.50
A Ilallierafter Radio . . .
the ideal set for tuning short
wave bands as well as regu-
lar broadcast. See it at .. .
PURCHASE RADIO
AND CAMERA SHOP

c

NOW
MICHIGAN

DANCING GAMES
REFRESHMENTS
NO CHARGE

Opening Number 1947-48 Lecture Course
Thursday, Oct. 23, 8:30 P.M.

4.

4

I

Two Great

Names in Journalism

HELP
WANTED
For clean-up work, three con-
secutive hours six mornings
a week, $1.00 per hour. See
Ken Chatters at the Student
Publications Building, 9-12,
1-6 P.M.

Ph. 8696

until
5 p. n.

TWO OF -TH E MOST POPULAR SPEAKERS IN TH E UNITED STATES
Meet on the platform to thresh out the all-important question
Can Rusia be part ofyOe fWlorld'

j

605 Church

1~

H. R. KNICKERBOCKER

WALTER DURANTY
k
y AN2
YESO .

I

NO!

i7

I

Ii

I

I

COMING!! IN PERSON!!
FRED WARING
AND HIS
PENNSYLVANIANS
sponsored by the
University of Michigan Men's Glee Club
at Hill Auditorium
October 31 and November 1, 1947 8:30 P.M.
(Use this convenient form for ordering concert tickets)
University of Michigan
Men's Glee Club
Michigan Union
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Enclosed find check or money order for $...............
for tickets to the Fred Waring concert-number, performance
and section as indicated below.

HOUSE OF VAUGHAN
P r e s en t s
PICK-UP PLATTER PRINTS
On Friday, Oct. 17 ... 8:30 - 12:00 P.M.
COEDS: If some strange man accosts you with a written invi-
tation for this dance, he is not "sticking you up," but "picking
you out.

I

This question will be debated in
the light of all developments
prior to time debate, takes place.

i

G RANADA C
FULLEST MEASURE
nP rI II i l I D PA Q IRF

H. R. KNICKERBOCKER
The SOVIET UNION under Stalin is a totali-
tarian EMPIRE, urged to expand by classic
imperial motives, plus the motives of evangeli-
cal communion. Its government is neither BY
nor OF the people, although it claims-as has
every other government from Pharaoh's to
Hitler's-to be FOR the people. Its aim is
conquest of the world . . . of this planet.
The United States and the British Common-
wealth-the last bulwarks of freedom and
justice and individual dignity and moral de-
cency-can remain free of Soviet domination
only by making their strength so impressive,
as well as so real, that Stalin will not dare to

A

't

WALTER DURANTY

RUSSIA wants only to live in peace in order
to develop its own vast natural resources and
repair war damage. It has too much territory
at home to be thinking about imperialism or
world communism, which Stalin and its pres-
ent leaders have progressively thrown over-
board. The Soviet government has existed
FOR the people and has greatly raised the
standards of education, production and health.
RUSSIA can be part of ONE WORLD-if,
without weakness or appeasement, the English
speaking nations will understand Russia and
its problems; and will maintain good relations
despite the machinations of enemies and their
short-sizhte1di :heit well-meansine echoes in

I

w. . "_ __ _ w n.nn T" 4l

iI E

Friday. Oct. 31. 8:30 P.M. Saturday. Nov. 1, 8:30 P.M.

I II

11

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