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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 23, 1947 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-09-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 194t

UNIQUE 11IS'TOR:
Lobanov-Rostovsky Writes
Book on Russia and Europe

"Russia and Europe 1789-1825"
by Prof. Andrei A. Lobanov-Ros-
tovsky of the history department
has just been published by the
Duke University Press.
The book contains a comprehen-
sive analys-is of the roleof. Russia
in the history of Europe during
the period from 1789 to 1825. It
differs from., the usual history in
that it includes the side events
Michigan's Dutch
Will Be Honored
Dutch citizenery of Michigan
will be honored in November by a
display of Dutch paintings in the
Museum of Art and several auxi-
liary exhibits.
The paintings include works of
Rembrandt, Steen and Van Ruid-
dael which were recovered for the
Netherlands by the U. S. Army.
Prof. Ralph Eammett of the Art
School represented the University
in this work.
Rare documentary material re
lacing to Dutch settlements in
- Michigan will be displayed by the
Clements Library and the Michi-
gan Historical Collections.
Dutcla music of the period will
be presented by the music school
in two November concerts.
Members of the committee
planning these activities are Prof.
Jean Paul Slusser, Dr. James P.
Adams, Dr. Randolph Adams,
Arthur L. Brandon, Dr. W. Ray-
mond Kendall, Dr. Warner G.
Rice and Dr. Lewis G. Vander-
velde.

that contributed to the major
happenings in Europe from the
Russian revolution through the
Napoleonic Wars.
Prof.' Lobanov-Rostovsky dis-
cusses Russia from the cultural,
military and historical standpoint
during a period in European hist-
ory which he c4escribes as, "strik-
ingly similar to the era from
which the world is now emerging,
particularly in reference to
Russia."
The 450-page book, which is
intended primarily for advanced
students in Russian history and
for those interested in interna-
tional history, sells for five dollars.
Prof. Lobanov-Rostovsky's plan is
to write a complete diplomatic his-
tory of Russia. He has been work-
ing on this history for ten years.
"Russia and Europe 1789-1825" is
the first publication resulting
from this work. He has already
compiled enough material for an-
other volume.
"Russia and Europe 1789-1825"
is Prof. Lobanov-Rostovsky's third
book. The other two are "Russia
and Asia," which covers Russia's
relations with the Orient and "The
Grinding Mill" in which he de-
scribes his personal experiences in
Russia from the beginning of the
first World War through the
Communist revolution.
Prof. Lobanov-Rostovsky, who
specializes in teaching Russian,
Balkan and Slavic history, came
to the United States in 1930 and
taught for 13 years at U C L A.
During the war he served with the
Army Specialized Training Pro-
gram while on leave from UCLA.
He came to the University in 1945.

Hillel Ready
To Begin New
Fall Program
After the weekend of welcoming
new students B'nai B'rith Hillel
Foundation is ready to launch on
its program of social, cultural and
religious activities.
Rabbi Herschel Lyman and Hil-
lel Foundation President Howard
Freeman, together with the stu-
dent council and, student directors,
will direct a program of fireside
discussions, Inter-faith work, rec-
reation, concerts and religious
services.
Yom-Kippur services will be
held at 8 p.m. today and all day
tomorrow in Lydia Mendelssohn
Auditorium as a function of Hillel
Foundation. Friday evening serv-
ices will be conducted weekly be-
ginning this Friday.
Students interested in drama or
writing are invited to express their
talents with the Hillel Players or
the Hillel News, a monthly jour-
nal. Rabbi Lyman will conduct a
seminar on 'The Jewish Person-
ality as Reflected in Our Modern
Literature" and other courses will
be presented if the demand is suf-
ficient.
Recreational facilities, record
collection and the Louis Weiss
Memorial Library are available to
students at Hillel at all times.
Read and Use
The Daily Classifieds

Four University students attend-
ed the Area Conference on Com-
munity Goodwill, Friday through
Sunday, at Camp Green Pastures,
Grass Lake, Mich., under the aus-
pices of The Michigan Council of
Churches and Christian Educa-
tion.
Mel Marcus and Don Irvin rep-
resenting the Congregational Dis-
ciples Guild, Hayrettin Yorganci-
oglu and Lela Desai, International
Center, and John Craig, program
director at Lane Hall, attended
the Conference, designed to bring
together in each area people from
varied groups such as labor, in-
dustry, education, churches and
racial groups.
The purpose of the conference
is for the development of goodwill
and understanding at points of
tension and conflict.
Henry Klauke, president of the
Newman Club at St. Mary's Chap-
el, will work with Fr. Frank J.
McPhillips and Fr. John F. Brad-
ley to carry out a program of spir-
itual, intellectual and social ad-
vancement for Catholic students
on campus.
weekly open houses, SundayET
Activities for the group in-
clude weekly open houses, Sunday
morning breakfasts, parties and
an annual formal dance. A dis-
cussion group will meet at 8 p.m.
tomorrow in St. Mary's Chapel
Club Room to discuss "Christian

Doctrine." Fr. McPhillips extends
an invitation to all students in-
terested in joining tlis group.
Roger Williams Guild of the
Baptist Church is discussing the
New Testamen t in thestudent
class at 10 am. Sunday mornings
and has weekly Guild meeting at
6 p.m. Sunday at the chuvch.
Morning services will be held at
11 a.m., Rev. Chester Loucks said.
Congregational-Disciples Guild
will meetpat 6 p.m. Sundays in the
basement of the Congregational
Church ,ith Rev. H. L. Pickerill
as advisor and Jean Garee as stu-
dent assistant director.
Episcopal Canterbury Club will
have a study group at 10 a.m.
Sunday and regular Club meeting
at 6 p.m. followed by a choral
evening service and coffee hour.
Activities of the Club are direc-
ted by Rev. John H. Burt, chap-
lain, and Maxine Westphal, coun-
selor for women students.
~* *
Weekly Guild meetings of the
Evangelical and Reformed Church
will be held at 5 p.m. Sundays
with Rev. Cornelius Loew as
director.
* * * .
The Lutheran Student Associ-
ation meets at 9 a.m. Sundays at
the center for Bible study and
5 :30 at the Zion Lutheran Parish

GUILD ACTIVITIES:
Students Attend Goodwill Conference

Hall for Association meetings.
Rev. Henry Yoder is pastor of the
association and Emma Schmidt
is counselor for women students.
Wesley Foundation of the
Methodist Church will meet at 5
p.m. Sunday frith Rev. J. B. Ken-
na as minister and Doris Reed as
assistant student director.
* * *
Westminster Guild of the Pres-
byterian Church will meet Sun-
days a, 5 p.m. in the churchso
cial hall. Rev. James VanPernis
is student director at the church.
The Michigan Christian Fellow-
ship will hold Bible Study at 8
p.m. every Wednesday in Lane
Hall. This group also meets at
4 p.m. Sunday in Lane Iall for
Worship.
Musical
Supplies
REEDS - STRINGS
Complete
Musical Itepat#
PAUIL'S
MUSICAL REPAIR
209 F. Washington Ph. 8132

I

RIGHT SIDE UP AGAIN-Year-old Irene Litterio gets accustomed
to her high chair after an operation for an "upside-down" stomach
which her doctor said had resulted in her being able to take all food
by the mouth. A pediatrician at Babies Hospital, Newark, N. J. said
the child's stomach and small and large intestines, which had been
up in the chest, were restored to normal position in an operation at
the hospital.
RARE BOOKS ROOM:
First Editions Here Trace
Growth of American Writing

P

i,. "^

WIt
Corner Forest and South University
DRUGS - COSMETICS - TOBACCOS
Breakfast at 7:30 A.M.
Service - Quality "Good Food"
'Meet Your Friends at Witham's"

A survey of the entire develop-
ment of American writing may be
found in rare first editions housed
in the Rare Books Room of the
University's General Library, ac-
cording to the Michigan Alumnus.
The Library possesses first edi-
Dean Explains Increased
TeachingOpportunities
Students who planned to enter
any other profession are now mak-
ing inquiries about teaching oppor-
tunities, Dean James R. Edmonson
of the education school has re-
vealed.
He said that the current teacher
shortage offers a special opportun-
ity to students. "For the next
decade well-qualified teachers will
have exceptional opportunities for
recognition and advancement," he
said.
Special programs in education
are attracting student interest,
Dean Edmonson said. One in par-
ticular is the combination program
of study in educ'ation and business
administration, he declared.

FOR TRANSPORTATION AND FUN!

tion volumes representative of the
work of nearly every American
writer of any prominence, ranging
from Timothy Dwight, author of
a long poem, "The Conquest of
Canaan," published in 1835, to Ed-
na 6t. Vincent Millay, contempo-
rary poet.
Especially well-represented is
the period from 1825 to 1890, with
the work of novelists James Feni-
more Cooper, Nathaniel Haw-
horne and Henry James, and poets
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and
John Greenleaf Whittier. There
are nearly 50 first editions of
James' novels and about 30 first
editions of Cooper'sworks, includ-
ing "The Deerslayer" and "The
Last of the Mohicans."
Mark Twain heads the list of
a special collection of American
wit and humor. The Mark Twain
collection was enriched last year
by the gift of 88 volumes from the
private library of the late Orla B.
Taylor of Detroit. The Rare Books
Room contains first editions of
almost everything Twain wrote, in
addition to volumes from most
other American humorists.

000.it's SER

I-CYrCL

I

Largest Assortment of domestic and imported
Beer - Wines - Champagnes

I

Revlon - Max Factor - Courtley - Sea forth
Everything-for you-at Witham's
The Students "Drug Mart"
WITHAM'S - South U's Leading Drug Store
S. D. D. for Mich. State Liquor Control Comm.

VARIABLE SPEEDS
Z.OCRASH GUARDS
r TWIST GRIP CONTROLS
fr DUAL IGNiTION SYSTEM
t FOOT BRAKE (25% Oversize)
t KICK STARTER (Extra)
l TIME PAYMENTS
$24950

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is" i a,:' t' r : i . "' " s CS}4
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:Y!'L'"1::;'..: l }
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S.

FALL

RALEIGH . the Bicycle Superb
" Three speeds, ride uphill sitting down
* Chaincase, completely encloses chain
" Rims, double weight
" Heavier spokes, four more in the rear
for extra strength

I

FAnSCIATIOn
VERY WISE YOUNG COLLEGE WOMAN
knows that a new smart Fall look depends on more
than a smooth costume or a fetching hat. IT'S THE
' LITTLE GLAMOUR TRICKS THAT REALLY
COUNT . . . a fragrant perfume, a good clear pow-
der, a beautiful shade of lipstick, that complete the
finishing touches to that special Autumn charm. We
offer you the services of our expert trained cosmetician
and a complete selection of perfumes, colognes, and
everything in the line of cosmetics.
IRDEN MATCHABEL&I
LONG LENTIHERIC
LLI NARCELLE
Y REVLON

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