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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 07, 1947 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1947-01-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MIChIGAN DAILY

TUE S'T)AY..TANUATVV7,191

s Will Sign

JDENT CONTROL:
hicago Conference Sets
udependenceProgram

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the first
of' a series of five articles dealing
with the Chicago Student Confer-
ence.
Establishing the independence
nd freedom from censorship of
udent organizations and publi-
ations, eliminating the com-
ercialization in intercollegiate
ports, and assuring that all stu-
ent activity funds are controlled
y the students themselves were
Mme of the aims agreed upon at
ae Chicago Student Conference
ecember 28-30.
fichigan Delegates
Among thes475 representatives
f 304 colleges in 42 states who
et at the University of Chicago
plan the creation of a National
tudent Organization were four
ridge Contest
E'ntries Begin
Bridge enthusiasts may register
r the annual all-campus bridge
urnament from 3 to 5 p.m. to-
iy and tomorrow at the Student
ffices in the Union.
Onlysundergraduate University
udents are eligible and must
gister in order to enter the tour-
ament. Names and addresses of
th participants will be neces-
ry.
The elimination round will take
ace at 1:45 p.m. Sunday, in the
riion Ballroom.
The Howell system of duplicate
idge will be used. Sections will
set up, consisting of six or
ven tables. Four couples will be
lected from each section to com-
te on the following Thursday,
in. 16. The number of sections
il depend on the number of
)uples entering the tournament.
Two couples selected from the
nal round will represent the
niversity as finalists in an inter-
>llegiate bridge tournament with
etional rinners throughout the
untry. This tournament will be
eld in Chtcago.
Mixed couples and stags are eli-
ble. The Union will award me-
alions to the top four couples.

Michigan delegates: Terrell Whit-
sett, Rae Keller, James Reiss, and
Tom Walsh who, as an alternate
delegate from the Student Legis-
lature,, took the place of Archie
Parsons who was ill.
Promote Student Exchange
Fostering cultural activities,
promoting two-way student ex-
change and facilitating student
travel both within this country
and abroad were advocated as
measures to promote student
friendship and understanding on
national and international levels.
A National Continuations Com-
mittee was established which, act-
ing on the mandates set forth by
the Chicago conference, is to pre-
sent a tentative constitution for
the new organization to the con-
vention which will meet next
summer.
Whitsett on Committee
MiChigan's Terrell Whitsett was
named vice-chairman of the
Michigan region by 18 delegates
representing eight schools within
the state. He is, therefore, an al-
ternate member of the NCC which
is composed of one delegate from
each of 30 regions plus three
members of national student or-
ganizations.
Jim Smith, president of the
University of Texas Student As-
sembly, whose initiative produced
compromises on several major
controversial issues, was chosen
to head the NCC. By acclamation,
Russell Austin of the University
of Chicago, chairman of the
American delegation to the World
Students Congress in Prague last
summer, was made the NCC vice-
chairman. Other officers elected
were Cliff Wharton of Harvard,
secretary; and John Simon of
Ford ham, treasurer.
The delegates ordered the con-
tinuations committee to investi-
gate means of cooperation with
the World Student Service Fund
and "favored the principle of need
alone as the basis of the distribu-
tion of relief."
Tomorrow: Shadow of the Con-
federacy

etsWn
For Refresher
Course Today
Registration will begin at 8 a.m.
today in the Rackham Building
for the University's fourth Veter-
ans Refresher Course, according
to Clark Hopkins, assistant di-
rector of the Veterans Service Bu-
reau.
Actual classes will begin Thurs-
day morning and meet four days
a week concluding on Tuesday,
Feb. 4: As of yesterday 130 men
had enrolled but the total num-
ber may be as high as 150 by the
time the refresher course actually
begins.
One class each will be offered in
history, chemistry and physics. A
review of English, a course in lit-
erature and five mathematics
courses complete the schedule.
Veterans will be allowed to choose
only one mathematics course.
Besides the regular classes, spe-
cial tours of the general library
and of the R.O.T.C. rifle range
have been arranged.
In order to qualify for subsis-
tence under the GI Bill of Rights,
veterans will be required to take
three four-hour classes, and they
are at liberty to select a fourth if
they wish. Hopkins stated that no
upperclass subjects are being of-
fered by the University because'
most of the incoming veterans'
have not been to college or else
left in their freshman year.
The purpose of the refresher
course, according to Hopkins, is to
get veterans accustomed to study-
ing and to get them acquainted
with the University and other stu-
dents. Most of the veterans com-
ing in now went into service after
the war had finished, he said, and
their readjustment will be prob-
ably more simple than that of vet-
erans enrolled in previous terms.

Coeds Given
Icy Greeting
Thirty-two members of
Gamma Phi Beta sorority re-
turned to their cold house yes-
terday after workmen repaired
the furnace stoker which filled
the house with coal gas fumes
during Christmas vacation.
Barred from the house by the
Health Service Sunday, Gam-
ma Phi members spent the
night doubling up at other so-
rorities or sleeping at the
Union. Eleven women slept in
the sorority annex.
Theatre Offers
Award Play
The Drama Critics' Award play
"The Glass Menagerie" will be
given at 8:30 p.m. tomorrow at
the Michigan Theatre.
Produced and staged by Eddie
Dowling, the cast of the Tennes-
see Williams comedy drama in-
cludes Pauline Lord, Jeanne Shep-
herd, Richard Jones and Edward
Andrews. The play, which won
the acclaim of critics all over the
country, ran two years on Broad-
way.
The plot of the play concerns
the struggle of a southern widow
to obtain wealth for her son and a
suitable "gentleman friend" for
her daughter. The title of the play
is taken from the collection of
glass animals which symbolize the
characters' dream world.
Tomorrow night's performance
will be the only one given in Ann
Arbor by this company.

Annual Party
To Open Union
Doors To Girls
The fron, door of the Union will
be open to women for the annual
Union Open House, when the
house committee entertains Uni-
versity students with a variety of
activities from 1 to 5 p.m. Satur-
day.
The all-day affair will include
competitive sports playoffs, a wat-
er ballet, dancing and a special
General Electric stage show.
Tournaments to be played off
are bowling and billards, for
which trophies will be awarded.
The bowling tournament has been
featured this semester, and the 14
finalists will compete. Billiards
will be played on an individual
basis that day. In addition, the
WAA Swimming Club is to pre-
sent a water ballet in the Union
pool.
Electrical stunts and scientific
acts will be featured in the Union
Ballroom by the General Electric
House of Magic.
Programs will be distributed to
guests for information as to the
time and place of the events.
A member of the Union will ap-
pear on campus Friday wearing
some personal ideritification. What
it is to be will be announced later.
The Union will honor the student
who can identify him during the
open house, in addition to a num-
ber of prizes to be awarded.
The event is held annually to
acquaint students on campus with
activities and facilities of the Un-
ion.
Student Directories may be pur-'
chased from 1 to 5 p.m. today
through Friday at the 'Ensian
Business office in the Student
Publications Building.

Polonia Meeting .
Polonia Society will hbld a
meeting at 7:30 p.m. today in the
International Center.
Congregational ea...
Tea will be served from 4:30
to 6 p.m. today at the Congre-
gational-Disciples Guild House.
ASME To Meet ...
The American Society of Metal-
lurgical Engineers will hold a
business meeting at 4 p.m. tomor-
row in the seminar room of the
East Engineering Building.
The Ensian pictures will be re-
taken.
* * *
Piano Recital*. . .
Helen Ashley, pianist, will
present a piano recital in par-
tial fulfillment of the require-
ments for a Masters Degree in
Music at 8:30 p.m. today at
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
The program, which is open
to the general public, will in-
clude three sonatas by Beethov-
en, Chopin and Schubert.
'Ensian Tryouts . ..
There will be a meeting of all
Ensian Edit staff tryouts at 4:15
p.m. today in the Student Publi-
cations Building.
Broadcast Change . ..
"Stump the Professor," Uni-
versity radio program, which
was formerly heard at 2 p.m.
Saturday over Station WJR,
will be broadcast at 2:30 p.m.
hereafter.
Guests this Saturday will be
Dr. Frank Robbins, Major Rob-
ert Brown. Professors Robert
Angell, George Kiss and Amos
Morris.
Chemical Society ..
Faculty and student members
of Phi Lambda Upsilon, national
Fson

chemical honorary society, will
meet at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow in
the West Conference Room of the
Rackham Building.
W. L. Badger, consuting engi-
neer, will show kodachrome slides
of his 1946 business trip to Eu-
rope.
Canterbury Club,.
Following Holy Communion
Service at 7:15 a.m. tomorrow,
the Canterbury Club will serve
breakfast at the Student Cen-
ter.
* * *
House Presidents . .
League House presidents will
hold a compulsory meeting at 5
p.m. today in the League.
Prof. Irene Place, of the School
of Business Administration, will
speak on "Career Opportunities
for Women in Business."
Prof. Warren *. -
Prof. Austin Warren, of the
University of Iowa English de-
partment, will give a talk on
"Emerson as Self-Therapist" at
4:15 p.m. today in Rackham Am-
phitheatre.
Prof. Warren is associate edi-
tor of two scholarly journals,
"The New England Quarterly,"
and "American Literature." In
addition, he has contributed over
30 articles on English and Ameri-
can literature to such pubhca-
tions.
The author of biographies on
Alexander Pope, Henry James and
others, Prof. Warren is known for
his work both as a research
scholar and a writer of criticism.
Before becoming a member of
tht Iowa faculty in 1939, Prof.
Warren taught at the Universities
of Kentucky, Minnesota and Bos-
ton. His lecture today is open lto
the public.

CAMPUS HIGHLIGHTS

Prof. ("Iusiaf soll o *
Plant hormones will pe dis-
cussed by Prof. Felix G. Gustaf-
son and Prof. Carl D. LaRue, of
the botany department, in a
Sigma Xi symposium at 8 p.m.
tomorrow in Rackham Amphi-
theatre.
"The Chemistry of Hor-
mones and their Physiological
Effects" is the subject of Prof.
Custafson's talk. Prof. LaRue
will speak on "Some Morpho-
oigical Effects of Hormones."
Refreslhments will be served
following a question period. The
meeting is open to the public.
Urology Seminar.
More than 65 doctors from all
over the country will attend a
postgraduate seminar in urology,
sponsored by the department of
postgraduate medicine of Univer-
sity Hospital and the Detroit Uro-
logical Society, tomorrow and
Thursday at Rackham Amphi-
theatre.
Guest lecturers at the Seminar
will be Dr. Robert R. Dieterle,
consultant in psychiatry at St.
Joseph's hospital in Ann Arbor,
Dr. Robert S. Hotchkiss, assistant
professor of urology at New York
University Medical College and
Dr. Robert C. Moehlig, professor
of clinical medicine at Wayne
University.
Diamonds
and
Wedding
s cw
(i 4ELV'Rings
f)717 North University Ave.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

1

(Continued from Page 2)
U. of M. Flying Club meet to-
morrowsat 7:30 p.m., Rm. 1042, E.

Announcing the
OPENING OF A NEW SERVICE
to the Students and Faculty of Michigan
THE STATE STENOGRAPHIC SERVICE
willbring you all the advantages of a private office
at a cost that everyone can afford.
You can profit by using the services of a stenographer
and typist familiar with your copy requirements.
Inquiries invited
Hill and State Streets ... Phone 9502
803 South State Mrs. Rose Jennings

I

Engineering
tonight.
La P'tite
Grill Room,

Bldg. Board meeting
Causette: 3:30 p.m.,
League.

meet at 8 p.m., home of Mrs. Paul
F. Chenea, 1054 South Main.
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
social committee meeting at 4:30
p.m., at Foundation.
U of M chapter of the Intercol-
legiate Zionist Federationiof
America meet at 8 p.m., Hillel
Foundation. The Hechalutz Con-
vention and the World Zionist
Congress will be discussed.

Chlristian Science Organization
meeting at 7:30 p.m., Upper Room,
Lane Hall.
League House Presidents. Im-
perative House Presidents meeting
at 5 p.m., League. Mrs. Irene Place
will address the group on the sub-
ject "Career Opportunities for
Women in Business."
Play Reading Section of the
Faculty Women's Club meet at
the home of Mrs. A. G. Ruthven
at 2 p.m.

Polonia Club meeting at
p.m., International Center.
freshments.

7:30
Re-

i

Commg Events
Notice to Students in Wood Tech-
nology:
Mr.,Leo Jiranek, Consultant De-
signer, will speak on Furniture
Design at 11 a.m., Thurs., Jan. 9,
East Lecture Room, Mez. Floor,
Rackham Bldg. All Wood Tech-
nology students are expected to
attend. Faculty and students of
other Departments are invited.
fU. of M. Section of the Ameri-

can Chemical Society will meet at
4:15 p.m., Jan. 10, Rm. 151,
Chemistry Bldg. Dr. W. M. Stan-
ley, Department of Animal and
Plant Pathology, The Rockefeller
Institute for Medical Research,
Princeton, N.J. will, speak on
"Studies on Purified Influenza
Virus." The public is cordially in-
vited.
Dr. Sam G. Wildman of the
California Institute of Technol-
ogy will discuss the Separation
and Properties of Spinach Pro-
tein at 4:15, Jan. 8, East Lecture
Room, Rackham Bldg. Everyone
invited.
Delta Sigma Pi, professional
Business Administrationffrater-
nity, pledge meeting at 7 p.m.,
Wed., Jan. 8, Rm. 302, Union. Ac-
tives meet 7:30 p.m., Rm. 302, Un-
ion.
Sigma Xi: 8 p.m., Wed., Jan. 8,
Rackham Amphitheatre. A sym-
posium on the physiological and
the morphological effects of
"Plant Hormones." Speakers,
Professors Felix G. Gustafson and
Carl D. LaRue, of the Department
of Botany. The public is invited.
Phi Lambda Upsilon faculty and
student members meet at 7:30
p.m., Wed., Jan. 8, W. Confer-
ence Room, Rackham. Mr. W. L.
Badger will show kodachrome
slides of his 1946 business trip to
Europe.
Romance Language Journal
Club meet at 4:15 p.m., Jan. 8,
East Conference Room, Rackham
Bldg. Prof. Charles Koella will
speak on "Panait Istrati, le vaga-
bond humanitaire."
AVC Meeting, 7:30 p.m., Wed.,
Union.

TYPEWRITERS
Bought, Sold, Rented Repaired
STUDENT & OFFICE SUPPLIES
0. D. MORRILL
314 S. State St. Phone 7177

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OPEN
FOR BUSINESS
at
115 W. LIBERTY
(Just Beyond Main St.)
We have served Michi-
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years. It will pay you
to come and see us.
RDER'S
"The Pen Hospital"

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III

AGAIN...
Student Directory
Sale
1:00 m 5:00 P.M.
Student Publications Building
$1.00
Get yours while they last!

OH! YOU

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PROGRAMS * TICKETS 0 HANDBILLS
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INVITATIONS @ ANNOUNCEMENTS 0 TAGS
POSTERS 0 STATIONERY 0 LABELS
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