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December 20, 1946 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-12-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHICAN DAILY,

FMAT. DEI

THE MICHICAN DAHY'

AL.IAYa r.v flI ir "' L (.r A '

.,.. _. ..,.._...__ _ . _ I !

REORGANIZATION LAW:
Congressmen To Receive Pay
Boost, Pension Plan Benefits
C'3

WASHINGTON, Dec. 19-(A)-
Starting in January congressmen
will get higher salaries:
And for the first time they will
be eligible for pensions when they
retire or are defeated.
Move Overdue
The pay and pensions program
is part of the reorganization law
enacted last August-the most
popular section of the law as far
as most legislators are concerned.
Even if some changes are made in
the measure, most observers ex-
pect the part dealing with con-
Bowling Club
Wins Contest
The University's WAA Bowling
Club, was yesterday announced the
winner of the National Tele-
graphic Bowling Tournament.
Jeannette Britton, Patricia
Brenzer and Beverly Haddon
placed fifth, eighth,-and tenth re-
spectively among the ten high
scorers for the individual two-
game series. Michigan was the
only participating school with
more than one representative in
this group.

SEE US!
After Christmas
At our new address
RIDER'S
115 West Liberty
7 Block beyond
Main Street

gressional pocketbooks to be re-
tained.
Sponsors of the act say the
move toward greater compensa-
tion for congressmen has long
been overdue. They declare that
in the past few years many able
men have quit because of the com-
paratively poor pay. They expect
the new law to attract better men
to congress.
Under the new program sena-
tors and representatives will get
$12,500 yearly instead of $10,000.
The bill also makes permanent the
$2,500 tax-free annual expense
fund for each member.
Pension Requirements
The law boosts the yearly salar-
ies of the Vice President, who pre-
sides over the Senate, and House
speaker from $15,000 to $20,000.
The pension plan will make
congressmen eligible for benefits
now given other federal employes.
To get a pension they will have to
make regular contributions equiv-
alent to six per cent of their basic
salary.
Before they can draw any bene-
fits, the legislators will have to
accumulate six years of service
and be at least 62 years of age.
Their annuity will be 2%/2 per cent
of their average annual salary,
multiplied by years of service.
Navy Will Enroll
V=6RecruitsI oday
A.U.S. Naval Recruiting Unit
will be in the Union from 9 a.m. to
4:30 p.m. today to enroll veterans
of all services and former Waves
in the Naval Reserve V-6 (inac-
tive duty) program.
Veterans who wish to join the
program must present their hon-
orable discharge certificates. For-
mer Navy personnel must also
bring Form 553.- Former Army
personnel should bring one of the
following forms: 615-360, 615-362,
615-365.
When you've done your work faith-
fully each day, you can zip through
final exams like a breeze. And when
you complete your secretarial train-
ing at Katharine Gibbs, you can
enter any business office with confi-
dence. Personal placement service in
four cities. College Course Dean.
KATHARINE GIBBS
NEW YORK 17......................230 Park Ave.
BOSTON 16.............90 Marlborough St.
CHICAGO II..........720 N. Michigan Ave.
PROVIDENCE 6....... .............. 155 Angel St.
COLLEGE
A School of Business-Preferred by
College Men and Women
4 MONTH
INTENSIVE COURSE
SECRETARIAL TRAINING FOR COLLEGE
STUDENTS AND GRADUATES
A thorough intensive course-starting
June, October, February. Bul-
letin A on request
SPECIAL COUNSELOR for G.I. TRAINING
Regular Day and Evening Schools
Throughout the Year. Catalog
President, John Robert Gregg, S.C.D.
Director, Paul M. Pair, M.A.
THE GREGG COLLEGE
Dept. NW, 6 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 2

r
4
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1

Bunyan Dance
Will Feature
Strong's Band
Bob Strong's orchestra will play
for the annual Paul Bunyan For-
mal, to be given by the forestry
school from 9 p.m. to midnight
Saturday, Jan. 11, in Waterman'
Gymnasium.
, Bob Strong started his musical
career by working his way through
Kansas State College by conduct-
ing his own band. After college,
Strong's band played regularly for
coast-to-coast radio programs, in-
cluding the "Uncle Walter's Dog-
house," "Avalon Time" and "Col-
lege Humor" programs.
An intermission program of en-
tertainment and group singing is
being planned for the dance. The
Paul Bunyan formal is given in
honor of, Paul Bunyan's annual
visit to the Michigan campus, and
Paul's famous ax will be displayed
on the diagonal the week before
the dance.
Tickets for the dance will be on
sale from 3 to 5 p.m. today at the
Union and League. Sales will con-
tinue every day after the Christ-
mas vacation until the night ofj
the dance. Fraternities and other!
groups who desire blocks of tick-
ets should call Ted Bank at the
forestry school.
Mike Misfovsky is general
chairman for the dance, and com-
mittee chairmen are Ted Bank,
publicity; Shorty Stiegerwaldt,
decorations; and Art Adams, tick-
ets.

Church News
John Craig, program director of
Lane Hall, and Allene Golinkin,
chairman of the committee on co-
operation between faiths, have
been invited to attend the Na-
tional Conference of Christians
and Jews which will be held Dec.
27 in Chicago.
Westminster Presbyterian Guild
will hold a semi-formal dance at
8:30 p.m. Jan. 10.
Buffet supper will be served and
favors will be distributed during
the dance. The dance is open to
the whole campus but admission
will be free to members of the
guild.
The clubrooms of St. Mary's
Chapel will be open for those
Catholic students who do not in-
tend to leave today.
r *
An open house for Methodist
students and their friends will be
held at 8:30 p.m. in the Pine Room
of the Wesley Foundation.
Caroling, a snowball fight and
story telling will be included in the
program.
Few Vets Unemployed
LANSING, Dec. 19-(A')-Only
7.9 per cent, or 40,817, of Michi-
gan's returned servicemen are re-
ceiving unemployment compensa-
tion benefits, the State Office of
Veterans Affairs reported today.

Mark Funeral
Services Held
In Cambridae
Funeral services for Prof. Ed-
ward L. Mark, Class of 1871, pro-
fessor emeritus of Harvard Uni-
versity, were held yesterday at
Cambridge, Mass.
A noted zoologist, Prof. Mark
died last Tuesday at his home in
Cambridge at the age of 99. Con-
sidered as having trained the
greatest number of zoologists in
the country, he has been cited as
the "leading factor" in lifting bi-
ology in the United States to its
present high rank among the sci-
ences.
Prof. Mark was an instructor in
mathematics at the University for
the year following his graduation.
After receiving his doctor's degree
at Leipzig, Prof. Mark began 45
years of teaching zoology at Har-
vard. He retired in 1921 as Hersey
Professor in Anatomy.
Honorary doctor of law degrees
were conferred on Prof. Mark by
the Universities of. Michigan and
Wisconsin. A member of numer-
ous zoological societies, he held
high offices in several of them.
For several years after his re-
tirement from Harvard, Prof.
Mark directed the Bermuda Lab-
oratory of Research which he had
helped to found.
Active until shortly before his
death, Prof. Mark returned to
Michigan in 1937 for the Univer-
sity's centennial celebation.

With all travel restrictions off
and renewal of the University's
peacetime Christmasnvacation
schedule, members of the faculty
will attend professional society
conventions throughout the coun-
try starting next week for the
first time since 1941.
Representing the University at
the American Political Science As-
sociation meeting Dec. 27-29 will
be Professors Everett S. Brown,
Arthur W. Bromage, James K.
Pollock, Harold M. Dorr, Lawrence
Preuss, Samuel J. Eldersveld and
John A. Perkins of the political
science department.
Science Conference
Professors Frank E. Eggleton, A.
Franklin Shull, Arthur E. Wood-
head, K. F. Lagler, Paul S. Welch,
George R. LaRue, Peter Okkel-
berg, Avalyn E. Woodward, Fred-
erick H. Test and Henry van der
Schalie of the zoology depart-
ment; Frank E. Eggleton of the
education department; Adelia M.
Beeuwkes of the public health de-
partment; L. R. Dice, director of
the Laboratory of Vertebrate Bi-
ology; William Hovanitz, Alexan-
der H. Smith, Harley H. Bartlett,
William C. Steere, William R.
Taylor and Rogers McVaugh of
the botany department; and Wil-
liam A. Gosline, assistant curator
of fishes in zoology museum will
attend the meeting of the Ameri-
can Association for the Advance-
ment of Science Dec. 26-31 in Bos-
ton.

Victor Roterus, resident direc-
tor of the Social Science Research
Project at Flint, sponsored by the
University, will be in Columbus,
0., Dec. 27-31 for the Association
of American Geographers meet-
ing.
Modern Language Meeting
Attending the meeting of the
Modern Language Association Dec.
27-30 will be Dean Hayward Ken-
iston, Professors Warren E. Pat-
terson, E. B. Ham, C. P. Wagner,
Paul M. Spurlin, Julie del Tolo,
Abraham Herman, and Francis
W. Gravit of the modern language
department.
Professors Robert C. Angell and
Theodore M. Newcomb of the so-
ciology department and Prof.
Renis Likert, head of the Univer-
sity Research Survey Center will
present papers at the American
Sociology meeting Dec. 28-30 in
Chicago.
Professors Nathaniel Coburn,
Izaak Opatowski, Maxwell O.
Rheade, William F. Everlein,
Leonard Tornheim and T. H. Hil-
debrandt will attend the American
Mathematical Society, Dec. 27-29
at Swarthmore College Swarth-
more, Pa.
Law Schools Association
Dean E. Blythe Stason, Profes-
sors Grover C. Grismore, Russell
A. Smith, Lewis M. Simes and Al-
bert F. Neumann will, attend a
conference of the Association of
American Law Schools Dec. 27-29
in Chicago.
Attending the Geological So-
ciety of America and Mineralogi-
cal Society of America meetings
Dec. 26-28 in Chicago will be Pro-
fessors Kenneth K. Landes, Ar-

mand J. Eardley, Thomas S. Lov-
ering, Claude W. Hibbard, Lewis
B. Kellum, George M. Ehlers,
George M. Stanley, James T. Wil-
son, Walter F. Hunt and Lewis S.
Ramsdell.
Prof. Ollie L. Bachus, of the
speech department, will attend a
meeting of the Speech Association
of America, Dec. 30, Jan. 1, in
Chicago.
Indian Show
To Be Given
An 'Evening in Hindustan" pro-
gram will be held at 8 p.m. Jan.
4 in the Rackham Building in De-
troit under the auspices of the
Detroit Association of University
of Michigan Women.
Hindustani dancers from the
University, led by Miss Kamla
Chowdry, will be featured on the
program. The dancers will be ac-
companied by flute, drum, and
song.
i GREETINGS!
To the boys and girls
of campus town,
A And to those of you
P that are homeward bound
A May v:e express a wish sincere,
For a
MERRY CHRISTMAS
and a
hAPPY NEW YEAR!
JOHNNY HARBERD
and Orchestra

a

WAR RESTRICTIONS END:

e

Faculty Members To Attend Meetings

_ .. .

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 2)

e.

Ir i

AlI-Wool
SWEATERS

I

SCARFS
Wool or Rayon
Beau Brummel Ties!
COOPER'S SOX

CHAMP HATS

SUITS and
TOPCOATS

WALK A FEW STEPSA
AND SAVE DOLLARS

KUOHN'S
.On the Corner...
122 EAST LIBERTY ST.
-tea. an, .mem -

Publication in The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University. Notices
for the Bulletin should be sent in
typewritten form to the office of the
Assistant to the President, Room 1021
Angell hal, by 3:00 p.m. on the day
preceding publication (11:00 a.m. Sat-
urdays.)
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 20, 1946
VOL. LVII, No. 75
Notices
League House residents who
have to remain until Saturday,
Dec. 21, must secure permission
from individualshousemothers if
they wish to be out after 8 p.m.,
Friday.
Campus mail: Mail going by
campus messenger service should
carry the name of department in
which the person addressed is em-
ployed. Room number may be in-
cluded but the name of the de-
partment is the identifying fea-
ture.
Women's housing will officially
close on Friday, Dec. 20, at 8 p.m.
Office of the Dean of Women
Automobile Regulation, Christ-
mas holidays: The Automobile
Regulation will be lifted for the
period beginning noon, Friday,
Dec. 20, until 8 a.m., Monday,
Jan. 6.
Office of the Dean of Students
All students who have applied
or plan to apply for admission to
this Medical School in September
1947 must take the Graduate Rec-
ord Examination to be given in
the Rackham Lecture Hall on
January 11, 1947. This is true even
though the applicant has already
taken the Medical Aptitude Test
sponsored by the Association of
American Medical Colleges.
During the University vacation
the General Library will close at 6
p.m. daily, beginning Fri., Dec. 20.
and will be closed all day Christ-
mas and New Year's Day. There
will be no Sunday service.
The Divisional Libraries and
Study Halls will be closed on
Christmas and New Year's Day
and will be open on a short
schedule Dec. 21 to Jan. 4. The
usual hours are 10 a.m.-12 noon,
and 2-4 p.m. Exceptions to this
schedule are as follows:
Engineering and E. Engineering
Libraries: 9 a.m.-12 noon; 2-5
p.m.
Physics Library, 9 a.m.-12 noon;
closed afternoons.
Hospital, 8 a.m.-12 noon; 1-5
p.m.
Warner G. Rice, Director
A University regulation requires
that students leaving Ann Arbor
for extended vacation return li-
brary books before their depar-
ture. The purpose of this regula-
tion is to insure the availability of
Light Lunches
. SOUPS
---SALADS
..SANDWICHES

books for scholars who with to
use them while the University is
not in session.
In accordance with this rule,
students planning to spend the
Christmas holidays outside Ann
Arbor must return library books
to the ChargiĀ±.; Desk of the Gen-
eral Library (or to the Divisional
Library to which they belong) o 'z
or before Fri., Dec. 20.
Special permission to charge
books for use outside Ann Arbor
may be given in case of urgent
need. Arrangements must be
made at the Charging Desk fcr
books from the General Library,
or with Librarians in charge of
Divisional Libraries.
Students taking library books
from Ann Arbor without permis-
sion are liable to a fine of $1.00.
Warner G. Rice, Director
Willow Run Village
West Court Community Bldg.
Fri., Dec. 20, 8:00 p.m., Classi-
cal Music Record Concert, com-
mentary by Mr. Weldon Wilson.
Lectures
University Lectures. Dr. T. C.
Lin (Lin Tung-chi), A.B. '28, Vis-
iting Chinese Professor of the
United States Department of
State, will deliver a series of four
0 FLOWERS I
for 0
SPECIAL
Q XMAS GIFTS
-~ WREATHS
POTTED PLANTS
CUT FLOWERS
CHELSEA 0
FLOWER SHOP v
<;;;;;> <;;;;;)<;;;;;O;;;O {;;; G

SPECIAL DANCE
at Michigan League
f c a Ii i r i ng
ALLAN TOWNSEND AND HIS BAND
There will be a floor show
Including CLIFF HOFF on tenor sax
and other specialty numbers
Stags Admitted 9-12 P.M.
Soft Drinks Served Friday and Saturday Nights

lectures on "The Quest of the
Chinese Mind" in the Rackham
Amphitheatre, Friday, Jan. 10 at
4:15 p.m., Monday, Jan. 13 at 8:10
p.m., Wednesday, Jan. 15 at 4:15
p.m., and Friday, Jan. 17 at 4:15
p.m., under the auspices of the
Department of History and the
Degree Program in Oriental Civil-
izations. The titles of the lectures
are as follows: (1) "The Aristo-
cratic Antecedent." A restatement
of the aristocratic lore of the pre-
Confucian feudalism and its last-
ing import. (2) "The Enlighten-
ment: Prize and Price." Wherein
the philosophers of the pre-Ch'in
times achieved and wherein they
failed. (3) "Humanism or Beyond
Humanism?" Why and wherefor
the millennial "bella metaphisica"
between the Taoists, Buddhists
and Confucianists; and who really
won out? (4) 'The Emerging
Ethos." Will the contact with the
West mean China's total intellect-
ual surrender or the birth of a new
synthesis?
Academic Notices
History 11, Lecture Group 11
(Professor Slosson) final exami-
nation Monday, Jan. 20, 2-5 p.m.
Exhibitions
Exhibit of student work of the

Cooper Union Art School, New
York, ground floor corridor, Col-
lege of Architecture and Design.
The Museum of Art presents
Prints by George Rouault, and
African Negro Sculpture, in the
galleries of Alumni Memorial
Hall. Last showing today from
10-12, and 2-5. The public is in-
vited.
Michigan Takes Shape - a dis-
play of maps. Michigan Histori-
cal Collections, 160 Rackham.
Hours: 8-12, 1:30-4:30 Monday
through Friday; 8-12 Saturday.
Events Today
University Radio Program:
2:30 p.m., Station WKAR, 870
Kc., Michigan Matinee, "The Man
Who Didn't Believe in Christmas."
2:45 p.m., Station WKAR, 870
Kc., "The Planets, Wanderers of
the Skies," Hazel M. Losh, Profes-
sor of Astronomy.
3:30 p.m., Station WPAG, 1050
Kc., Dorothy Ornest, soprano.
Roller-skating party. Wesleyan
Guild members and friends meet
at 7:30 p.m., Wesley Foundation
Lounge. Refreshments at the
Methodist Church following party.

A
I
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I
I

TO ALL!
'Jery Chriilrnai
AND A
Ual2 fl ?/e W earo
FROM
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