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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 29, 1946 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-09-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



PAGE EIGHT
Navy V-5 Unit
Enrollment
Quota Filled
Twenty students have enrolled in
the Navy V-5 program, Lt.-Comdr.
Harry Fitch, educational officer for
the NROTC unit announced yester-
day.
The twenty fill the quota for the
fall semester, Lt.-Comdr. Fitch said.<
The Navy V-5 plan is part of the
Holloway plan, he explained. Un-
der this plan students are allowed
two years of college during which
they receive $100.00 a month plus
payment of tuition, textbook costs,
and travel expenses to and from
home.
After completing two years of col-1
lege, students enrolled in V-5 spendc
approximately eight months in flight<
training, after which they are com-
missioned as ensigns. The flighti
training is followed by two years of
active duty.,
After completing the two years ofN
active duty, the flyer may choose be-t
tween staying in the Navy or goingc
on inactive duty. If he wishes to re-
turn to school, he will receive the
same benefits he did during his first?
two years of college.t
1,

THE MICHIGAN I AILY

NEISIMET

VETERANS' NOTES
EDITOR'S NOTE: This column is designed to provide veterans with information
of specific concern to them. All veterans are encouraged to submit topics or
specific questions for consideration here.

By TOM WALSH
One of the most frequently mis-
understood sections of the GI Bill of
Rights, according to W. L. Wallace
of the VA Guidance Center here, is
the distinction between the veterans
subsistence allowance and the allow-
ance for tuition and books.
The subsistence allowance is based
upon the calendar year; that is, the
veteran is eligible for as m a n y
months subsistence as he had time
in the service plus one year up to
a total of four years.
$500 Maximum
The tuition and supply allowance,
however, is based on a "school year"
of 34 weeks. In other words' the stu-
dent veteran is authorized to use the
$500 maximum allotment during the
normal school year of two terms.
There is roughly another half se-
mester left in the calendar year for
which the veteran is authorized the
tuition allowance at the normal rate
of $2.10 per day or approximately
$125.
Thus in the calendar year, an al-
lowance of $625 for supplies and tui-
tion is actually authorized.

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1946

www"MON9

I

//< A .
1
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fashion
stars...
Smart, attractive suits
with the new Peter Pan
collar and skirts with
box pleats in front and
back . . . 100% wool
featured in Royal Blue,
Brown, and Black - .

In the GI Bill, too, is the little pub-
licized fact that veterans in school
are charged the out-state rates for
tuition. This, according to the VA,
was put into the law because the edu-
cation of veterans was assumed as a
federal government responsibility
and state institutions are not ex-
pected to pay a portion of the vet-
erans expenses.
Quota Adjustment
Should the tuition and supply ex-
pense of any in-state veteran amount
to more than the allotted maximum,
however, the law provides that his
tuition shall be reduced to normal
rates charged others-in-state stu-
dents, or at least a sufficient amount
to bring him within the quota.
Free legal counseling service is
now available to all veterans in Ann
Arbor through the courtesy of mem-
bers of the American Bar Associ-
ation.
Veterans in need of legal counsel-
ing should apply to Karl Karsian at
the Ann Arbor Veterans Counseling
Center,' telephone 8204.
They will be put in contact with a
lawyer in the city who will render
legal advice without charge. Should
any legal action be necessary, ser-
vices will be rendered on a minimum
fee basis.
** *
Pay Blanks Now
A vailable for Vets
Application blanks for terminal
leave pay are now available at the
Veterans Service Bureau, Rm. 1516,
Rackham Building.
Free notary service is available for
the terminal leave blanks and also for
the servicing of other forms which
veterans have to fill out to obtain
government benefits Director Robert
S. Waldrop announced yesterday.
Village Voters
Will Register
Volunteer Canvassers
Plan Explanation Drive
Willow Villagers will be given the
opportunity to register Oct. 7 to 12
for the coming election, Phil West-
brook, co-chairman of the Village
registration drive, said yesterday.
Westbrook explained that the proc-
ess of registration is complicated by
the fact that the Village is partly in
Ypsilanti Township and partly in
Superior Township. Those who re-
side in Ypsilanti do not have to reg-
ister if they have registered there
previously and have voted in the past
two years. Everyone in Superior
township must register regardless of
past registration.
Ypsilanti township residents will
register at the West Court Commun-
ity Building while Superior residents
will register at the Village Commun-
ity Center near the rental office. Over
100 volunteer canvassers will start
going from door to door on Oct. 4 to
explain further the registration de-
tails.

Law School
Students Earn
Sebholairsluips
Announcement of s hoa1 shp
awards to twvelve students in the
Law School was made public today
by Dean E. Blythe Stason.
The nine Michigan residents and
three out-state students were noti-
fied by personal letters from Russell
Smith, Law School secretary, this
month after their selection by the
scholarship committee.
Richard C. Scatterday, '47L, Pon-
tiac, Ill., and Donald W. Phollion,
'48L, Saginaw, Mich., received the
Fellowships and Scholarships for
Superior Students which has stipends
from $800 to $1,200.
DeWitte C. Chatterton, '47L, Ann
Arbor, received the University Schol-
arship in Professional Schools-Law,
given to resident seniors by the Board
of Regents for one school term.
Margaret M. Farmer, '49L, Flint,
and Roberta M. Keppel, '49L, Birm-
ingham, have been awarded the Ed-
win C. Goddard Law Scholarship.
Donald M. Habermehl, '48L, re-
ceived the Class of 1904 Law Schol-
arship.
Bruce H1. Mellinger, '48L, Chelsea,
William R. Peterson, '48L, Cadillac,
Daniel W. Reddin, '49L, North Bal-
timore, Ohio, Hubert L. Rowlands,
'49L, Emporia Kansas, and Edward
C. Sievers, Jr., '48L, Lawton, received
Scholarships from the Henry Helf-
man Law Student Aid Fund.
Howard A. Cole, '49L, Lansing, has
been selected toreceive the Samuel J.
Platt Scholarship.
Perspectives Staff Will
Hold Meeting Tomorrow
The staff of Perspectives, literary
supplement of The Daily, will hold its
first meeting of the year at 7:30 p.m.
tomorrow at the League.
Room number will be posted in the
lobby.

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I

MICHIGAN BOOKSTORE

of
Arriving Daily at

STATE STREET AT NORTH UNIVERSITY

BOB GRAHAM, MGR.

HOLD THOSE WARBONDS!__

[Kr - "

I

*

*

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/N4om~

22.50

ELLIS ARNALL

J. H. COUSINS
307 SOUTH STATE STREET

------------

U

JAfterctC(fc

L
MELVIN PURVIS
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN ORATORICAL ASSN.
1946-47 LectureCurse
8 DISTINGUISH ED SPEAKERS
Oct. 17-HON. ELLIS ARNALL, 'Governor of Georgia. Sub-
ject: "The South Looks Forward."
Oct. 29-RANDOLPH CHURCHILL, noted British figure
and columnist, son of Winston Churchill. Subject:
"Socialism in England."
Nov. 7-LOUIS LOCHNER, for fifteen years head of the
Berlin Office of Associated Press. Subject: "The
Nuremberg Trials."
Nov. 21-BRIGADIER GENERAL ROGER RAMEY, noted
Air Force authority. Subject: "Air Power in the Atomic
Age."
Jan. 16-JOHN MASON BROWN, leading Broadway dra-
matic critic. Subject: SeeinA Things."
Feb. 20-MRS. RAYMOND CLAPPER, political writer and
author of "Washington Tapestry." Subject: "Behind
the Scenes in Washington."
Feb. 27-COLONEL MELVIN PURVIS, former member of
the F.B.I. and of the War Crimes Commission. Sub-
ject: "Can We Lessen Crime in the United States?"
March 22-MARGARET WEBSTER, famous actress and
director. Subject: "The Adventure of Acting."
SEASON TICKETS: $6.60, $5.40, $4.20 (inc. tax)
BOX OFFICE OPEN DAILY
Hours: 10:00-1 :00, 2:00-5:00
HILL AUDITORIUM

BRIG. GEN. ROGER RAMEY

1y

i

When duties cease and
comes release
From lectures, labs,
and classes,
We know that she will
want to be
The loveliest of lasses,
And at the dance, to
catch the glance
Of Tom, Dick, or
Charlie,
What better way than
right today
Be dressed your best
by COLLINS ...

,;4
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'

A

LOUIS LOCHNER

RANDOLPH CHURCHILL

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