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December 15, 1946 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-12-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I1

A FACULTY FOR KNOWING:
Haines'Day: Students,
Music, Books,_Fish'

Constitution

...

By HARRY LEVINE

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the 11th
of a series of articles on faculty
personalities. .
Prof. Donal Hamilton Haines
is probably the only man within
a 200 mile radius who can teach
a University class, listen to a sym-
phony, write a book and go fishing
all in the same day and not con-
sider it outside of his usual rou-
tine.
Good Hunter
Prof. Haines who teaches jour-
nalism here likes to regard Ann
Arbor as a base for hunting and
fishing operations.
Lawn Students
ATry NLRA
Practice Case
The University law students to-
morrow will argue the question of
whether supervisory employees
have collective bargaining rights
under the National Labor Rela-
tions Act.
In the hypothetical case "Jort
Motors Inc. v. The National Re-
lations Board," law students
Stanley Kaplan and Charles Levin,
representing Jort Motors, will op-
pose Richard Sieswerda, and
James McNicholas representing
the employees.
The case will be aired at 4 p.m.
in the practice court room, second
floor, Hutchins Hall.
Judges include: Prof. Russell A.
Smith, law school secretary; How-
ard, Jacobs and DeWittChatter-
ton, seniors in the law school.
The U. S. Supreme Court is
considering a question similar to
the one posed in "Jort Mortors"
case.
Hillel To Hold
Holiday Party
The Jewish festival Hanukah,
which will begin Wednesday, will
be celebrated at 8 p.m. today at
the B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation.
Hanukah commemorates the

In fact, Prof. Haines once lived
a year and a half in Sacramento,
California, "mostly because there
was good hunting and fishing
nearby and a tennis court down
the street."
Raisedin Kalamazoo and edu-
cated at the University, Prof.
Haines is a Midwesterner at heart.
He was graduated here in 1909
and in the traditional style of
newspaper men started out free-
lancing-a vocation that took him
all over the country.
Wise Newspaperman
Like .most wise newspapermen
Prof. Haines soon discovered that
the best newspapermen are ex-
newspapermen, and it wasn't long
before he branched out into short
story writing.
Little did he suspect that his
favorite forms of recreation, bunt-
ing and fishing, would prove to
be a subject strong enough to in-
terest readers 25 years later in
the second World War.
Juvenile Books
At the request of his publishers,
Farrar and Rhinehart, he started
a series of "outdoors" books for
juveniles. Much to Prof. Haines'
surprise, the book drew more
readers from the adult popula-
tion than it did from their chil-
dren.
In 1943 when the government
reprinted one of his books, "Luck
in All Weathers," in an Armed
Services Edition, Prof. Haines re-
ceived many letters from soldiers
andsailors overseas, some of them
ex-students of his.
Ex-Students homesick
"They came from all over-
India, Japan, the Pacific-and
they all said the same thing :
they were homesick," he says.
Today, back in Ann Arbor, Prof.
Haines manages to combine the
things he likes best into one
schedule.
"I still get in a lot of hunting
and fishing," he says, "and I never
have to go more than 35 miles
away from home. I never get be-
hind on my homework that way."
Registration for Medical
Aptitude Tests Required
Students who wish to take the
medical aptitude test, required by
the Association of American Medi-
cal Colleges, must register for the
tests tomorrow, Tuesday and
Wednesday in Rm. 100B of the
Rackham Building.
The tests will be given through-
out the country on Jan. 11. Re-
sults will be sent to three medical
colleges of the student's choosing.
Fee for the test is $5.

Plans in India
Made Known
U.S,. Model To Serve
As Basis for Project
EDITOR'S NOTE: This column of
news from India is published for the
information of Indian students on
campus and other students interest-
ed in Indian developments.
The American Constitution will
probably be used as a model for
the constitution for India to be
drawn up by the Constituent
Assembly.
Dr. Sachchidananda Sinha, tem-
porary chairman of the assembly,
pointed out that the American
Constitution had 'been taken as
a model for subsequent constitu-
tions, including those of the Do-
minions of Canada, Australia, and
South Africa, and he did not
doubt that the Constituent As-
sembly would pay greater atten-
tion to the provisions of the Amer-
ican Constitution than to those
of any other.
le added that "as a result of
my long experience of public life
for now nearly a century reason-
able agreements and judicious
compromises are nowhere more
called for than in forming a con-
stitution for a country like India."
"The question of exchange of
populations is unthinkable and
impracticable," Mr. Ghandi de-
clared recently, according to the
Associated Press of India.
He added: "In every province
everyone is on Indian, be he Hin-
du, Muslim, or of any other faith.
It would not be otherwise even
if Pakistan came in full. For me
any such thing would spell the
bankruptcy of Indian wisdom or
statesmanship, or both."
The Honorable Mr. Asaf Ali
has been appointed' Indian am-
bassador to the United States.
A prominent Congress leader,
Ali is at present transport mem-
ber in the Interim Government.
Jailed several times in connection
with the Congress movement, he
was returned, on the joint votes
of Hindus and Muslims from Del-
hi, to the Legislative Assembly in
1935 and again in 1945. He is also
a former member of the Congress
Working Committee and deputy
leader of the Congress party in
the Central Assembly.
Lw Student Held
DETROIT, Dec. 14-(P)-A 20-
year-old sophomore law student,
unable to follow his fancy on a
"pin money" educational allot-
ment from the government, was
held today on charges of burglar-
izing spacious Detroit homes of
$15,000 in cash and jewtls.

ETS

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PERFUMES

ad

COLOGNES

will be appreciated if they're from*

Phone 5933

235

South State (State Theatre Next to Us)

Complete Lines of Gift Sets - Toiletries - Colognes - Perfumes -
Body Powders - Tolcums - Vanities - Courtleys -

victory of the Maccabees over the
Syrians who had attempted to
suppress the Jewish religion.
The Intercollegiate Zionist Fed-
eration of America, which is spon-
soring the celebration, will donate
all proceeds of the event to the
Jewish National Fund, the organ-
ization which purchases land in
Palestine for the Jewish National
Home.
Air Force Group
Appoints Leader
Phil Smith was appointed tem-
porary commander of the Ann Ar-
bor branch of the Air Force Asso-
ciation at its recent organizational
meeting.
Other temporary officers ap-
pointed by Tex Brown, chairman
pro-tem were Max Mathers, vice-
commander; Al Mundt, secretary;
Herman Miller, treasurer, Mich-
ael Miatech, Bill MacDermot,
John Reeves and Don Wilson,
council members.
Plans were made to draw up a
constitution which, after approv-
al, will be sent to the Washington
headquarters with the proposed
local name, "Ann Arbor Squadron-"
Pastors To Assemble
At Annual Conference
The Eighth Annual Pastors Con-
ference will be held Jan. 20-22 in
the Rackham Building under the
sponsorship of the University Ex-
tension Service and the Michigan
Council of Churches and Christ-
ian Education.
The Conference is open to pas-
tors of all denominations, reli-
gious educators, and other inter-
ested persons.
Dr. Walter Horton, member of
the faculty of the Oberlin School
of Theology, will deliver the con-
vocation address on the subject
"The World's Need and the
Church's Task."
VE
DEADLINE IS DEC.
orders for books must
LAST CHANCE to st
mainder of this semes

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For Children of All Ages

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Just So Stories

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Count Tie Pupoies . . . . . 1.00
America's Paul lRevere . . . . 2.30
Mr. Plum and the Little Tree . . 1.75
The Secotud Jigl ' Book . . . 2.50

Green Eyes

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Sets

Kiki and Muffy
Mother Goose stories

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THE GOLDEN ENCYCIOPEDIA
In the language children understand .
in full color . . . 2.50
Wahrs Bookstore
316 SOUTH STATE STREET

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Friendship Garden

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T E AN'S!
5 DAYS LEFT
20 for all purchases on veterans requisitions,
either be filled or cancelled this week.

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Back.

Lock up on paper, pencils and notebooks for the re-
ster.

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13

III f

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