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November 24, 1946 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-11-24

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SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1946T
'THE ICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TRREJ

INDIA IN THE NEWS:

Monarchy on Trial --Sir Iyer;
Afridi Look to Khyber Pass

EDITOR'S NOTE: The following digest
of news from India is offered for the
more than 100 Indian. students enrolled
this semester and for the caimpus-at-
large.
NEW DELHI, Nov. 20-By cable
(Delayed)-1Ionarchy will not justi-
fy itself unless Indian rulers prove
themselves worthy of their past and
pull together in pursuance of the
common.good of the whole of India,
Sir C. P. Ramaswami Iyer, Dewan of
Travancore, declared in a speech at
Trivandrum.
Very few of the .princes and
maharajahs of India seem to real-
ize that within the next few months
the question that would be put to
theim and will have to be answered
by them at the bar of history is
Oratorio To Be
Given Twice
Because of heavy student enroll-
ment, the University Musical Socie-
ty's annual presentation of Handel's
"Messiah" will be given twice this
year, at 8:30 p.m. Dec. 14, and at 3
p.m. Dec. 15.
A limited number of tickets for
the performances is on sale at the
society's offires in Burton Memorial
Tower.
Many of the soloists engaged for
the performances will be making
their initial appearance in Ann Ar-
bor.
Lura Stover, soprano, Ellen Repp,
contralto, and Ralph Lear, tenor, will
all be here for the first time. Alden
Edkins, bass, however, is a well-es-
tablished "Messiah" soloist.
The program will be under the di-
rection of Hardin Van Deursen, con-
ductor of the society..
TYPEWRITERS
Bought, Sold, Rented, Repaired
STUDENT & OFFICE SUPPLIES
O. D. MORRILL
314S. State St. Phone 7177

Whether they have justified their
existence and continuance," Sir
Iyer said.
Two hundred Afridi leaders told
Viceroy Sir Archibald Wavell, dur-
ing his tour of the northwest fron-
tier, that in the event of a British
withdrawal from India, they would
request that the Khyber Pass be re-
turned to them, the original owners.
A spokesman for the leaders
said the Afridi might then elect to
remain aloof or link themselves
with Afghanistan, and added that
in view of the communal disturb-
ances in India they had no desire
to negotiate with the interim gov-
ernment until Hindu-Muslim dif-
ferences had been settled.
The Viceroy asked the leaders to
remember "that your interests are
bound up with India as a whole and
not with any political party."
* * *
Three great irrigation works, which
will ultimately raise India's food pro-
duction by about 2,000,000 tons a
year, are to be built on the Mahana-
di, Damodar and Kosi rivers.
Conceived on multi-purpose lines
similar to T.V.A., they are expected
to irrigate about 6,000,000 acres of
land and genarate 1,500,000 kilowatts
of hydro-electric power. Over $900,-
000,000 will be expended on the three
projects.
Perspectives Solicits
New Contributions
Perspectives, the University liter-
ary magazine, is seeking contribu-
tions for its December issue from all
interested students, either graduate
or undergraduate, according to Mar-
gery Wald, editor of the magazine.
Manuscripts may be given to a
member of the staff or submitted by
mail to Perspectives, Student Publi-
cations Building. They must be
marked with the writer's name and
return address.
Students who have submitted ma-
terial may pick up their manuscripts
at the Perspectives office.

Church News
Discussions and open houses will
be held by the student religious or-
ganizations today.
"How the Jewish Idea .of God
Grew," the second of five lecture dis-
cussions on "The Christian Idea of
God," will be held at 10 a.m. today at
the CANTERBURY CLUB STUDENT
CENTER.
The Rev. John H. Burt will lec-
ture preceding a discussion of the
topic.
Following a supper at-6 p.m., the
Canterbury Club will hear Dr. F. H.
Littell, director of the Student Re-
ligious Association, on "Religion and
the State University."
The Law Club and 1027 E. Univer-
sity will be host and hostess at an
open house today at the B'nai B'rith
Hillel Foundation.
"My Religion Meets a Need" will
be discussed by the CONGREGA-
TIONAL-DISCIPLE GUILD at 6 p.m.
in the Congregational Church.
The Rev. Mr. Henry O. Yoder of
the Lutheran Student Association,
Rev. F. E. Zendt of the Memorial
Christian Church and Dr. Leonard A.
Parr of the First Congregational
Church will lead the discussion.
* * *
Members of the NEWMAN CLUB
will meet at 3 p.m. to discuss the
"Western Fr)lic" to be held Friday
and to hear a report on the Purdue
Conference.
* * *
The UNITA RIAN STUDENT
GROUP will discuss "What I Expect
From a Religion" at 6:30 p.m. at
1917 Washtenaw. Light refreshments
will be served.
Phone Official
To Speak Here
Promotional opportunities for col-
lege graduates will be discussed by
B. R. Marsh, vice-president of the
Michigan Bell Telephone Company
at 7:30 p.m.tomorrow in Rm. 319-325
of the Union.
This is the second in a series of
meetings sponsored by Delta Sigma
Pi, professional business adminis-
tration fraternity, and designed to
bring University students into closer
contact with prominent businessmen.
Mr. Marsh, a graduate of the Uni-
versity, will outline the promotional
opportunities for college students in
all fields of business, with particular
emphasis on the field of telephone
communications.
All students interested are invited
to attend and to take part in this
discussion.
Coeds...
(Continued from page 1)
extra-curricular life with their excel-
lent student government, their par-
ticipation in student publications, in
dramatics, in organizations interested
in music, in art, in scientific work,
and in social enterprises. They have
also demonstrated their sense of the
importance of academic work and
their sinceritr in the main purpose
of college by their superior position
each year on the comparative schol-
arship chart.
"I thing it is equally foolish to
claim that women who attend
women's colleges lead an abnormal,
segregated existence. They are no
more immured within the walls of
their campuses than the men are in
such colleges as Princeton and
Yale. I personally am glad that the

women of the American common-
wealth have the same privilege as
the men of choosing whether they
will go to a coeducational college or
to one for their own sex exclusively.
"There are advantages and disad-
vantages in both systems, but both
are making a sincere effort to edu-
cate the young people who enroll with
them, and in their graduates can
demonstrate their success. That one
system should be defended by be-
littling or criticizing the other seems
to me both unjustified by the facts
and unworthy of the educated mind."
Coal...
(Continued from page 1)

The University Broadcasting Serv-
ice, in cooperation with a leading na-
tional airline, is sponsoring a radio
script contest dealing with the sub-
ject of commercial aviation.
The contest is open to the faculty
and students of the University. The
writer of the best written script will
receive a prize of $50 to be given by
the airline.
Participants may submit one of
three types of radio script, in mono-
logue, dialogue, or skit form. All

entries must be of a nature favor-
able to commercial aviation and must
not be over fifteen minutes in length.
All scripts must be submitted to
committee chairman Prof. Waldo
Abbot on or before Feb. 28, 1947.
One script of the judges' choice in
each classification will be used on
three individual radio broadcasts
over the University's outlets. Thc
listening audience will approve o
criticize the scripts by letter. Thr
writer of the best letter in each clas-

AIRLINE OFFERS $50 PRIZE:
BroadcastingService HoldsScriptContest

sification will win a round trip ticket
to either Chicago or Washington.
Judges will be Prof. Waldo Abbot,
Dr. D. E. Hargis, Prof. John L.
Brumm and Prof. Emerson W. Con-
lon.

Pollock Takes Tour
Prof. James K. Pollock of the po.-
litical science department will con-
duct a tour of talks on Germany in
Wisconsin, indiana and Kentucky
this weekend.
Read and Use
The Daily Classifieds
---- ~~ ---- ~-d

11

I,

Christmas is coming
NOW IS THE TIME TO SHOP FOR
GIFTS THAT WILL BE REMEMBERED
We suggest Bridge Sets in Linen and
SHOP Cotton prints and Hand Apliques. Bridge
table covers, quilted, felt, printed cot-
ton and printed glazed silk.
Store Hours Through Christmas-9-5:30 Daily

The World's Greatest Music
IN YOUR HM
The COLUMBIA MASTERWORKS Program
Daily at 2:30 P.M. to 3:00 P.M.
Monday through Friday
A typical listener comment: "'Ever since I dis-
covered that you are playing Columbia Masterworks
every day at 2:30 P.M., my day has been planned around
this program . . . I can never get enough of this type
of music."
WUPAG
1050 ON YOUR DIAL

GAGE LINEN SHOP

_i

"Always Reasonably Priced"

11 NICKELS ARCADE

1.

.,

E11

MI

1111

Sunday..

.3:00 P.M.

DR. H.H. SAVAGE
will speak at the
DEDICATION SERVICE
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron
SERMON BY THE PASTOR:
11 :00 A.M.: Broken Cisterns
7:30 P.M.: Pleasures of Ungodliness

1'! t'n

halt the total walkout of 400,000 soft
coal miners which started Thursday
after a paitial preliminary work
stoppage. Lewis still gave no sign of
sending them back to work despite
the contempt action.
Small Emergency Stock
Krug, tightening the freeze of bi-
tuminous supplies ordered in advance
of the walkout, disclosed that it had
netted less than two days' normal
production for emergency distribution
beyond supplies then held by dealers
and on docks.
"This criti:ally small emergency
stock," he telegraphed the governors,
"makes it imperative that you, by
proclamation or other means, notify
the communities of your state that
these supplies will soon be exhaited

11111

JI

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