100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 21, 1946 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-11-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TF[Ti'RgDAY, N(}WNMER 21, HI

PAGE SIX TTT1JT~4DAY, NOVFMBETt 21, 1946
I I

Public Administration Course
Lauded b Graduate Students
-A I

Moonshine Will Oust Sunshine
Ini Saturday MorningEclipse

By CINDY REIGAN
Complete satisfaction with the or-
ganization of the Institute of Public
Administration has been expressed
by students now enrolled in this new-
DAILY OFFICIAL1

BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 5)
tonight in the Union. Pledge Initia-
tion.
Veterans Organization meeting at
7:30 tonight, 3rd floor, Union. Elec-
tion of Officers.
The Foresters' Club meeting at
7:45 tonight, Rm. 2039, Natural Sci-
ence Bldg.
Radio Club meeting at 7:30 tonight,
Rm. 220 W. Engineering.

Gilbert and Sullivan
7:00-9:00 tonight, League.

rehearsal,

Kappa Phi Club meets 5:30 p.m.
today. Guest speaker, Mrs. Induk
Pahk of Seoul, 1Xorea.
Leadership Training conferences,
4:30 to 5:30 p.m., today, Fireplace
Room, Lane HMall.
Hillel Foundation: Tryouts 3:30-
5:30 p.m., Fri., Nov. 22, for persons
interested in acting in the dramatic
plays and radio skits.
Coming Events
Graduate Outing Club ice-skating
and hiking party at 2:30 p.m., Sun.,
Nov. 24, Outing Club rooms, Rack-
ham Bldg.
Lutheran Student Married Group
will meet for dinner at 6:00 p.m.,
Fri., Nov. 22, at the Center. For Res-
ervations call 7622.
Dr. Stewart Allen, visiting surgeon
at the University Hospital, will speak
on "China at the Crossroads" at 8:30
p.m., Fri., Nov. 22, in Robert Owen
Cooperative House; auspices of the
Inter-Cooperative Council. Everyone
is cordially invited. Refreshments.
Ann Arbor Library Club meeting
at 7:45 p.m., Fri., Nov. 29, Rm. 110,
General Library. Dr. Wallace A.
Bacon of the English Department
will speak on the writing of his play,
"Savonarola."
Hindustan Association: "Cultural
Exhibits from India," will be present-
ed on December 6-7 in the East Con-
ference Room, Rackham Bldg. Send
contributions to Mrs. B. Parikh.
"Aladdin and the Wonderful
Lamp" will be presented by The Chil-
dren's Theatre of the department of
speech Friday at 3:45 p.m., and Sat-
urday at 1:30 and 3:30 p.m. in the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre. Tickets
are on sale at the Theater box office
from 10-5, daily.

est graduate division of the Univer-
sity.
These students, coming from seven
different states, are working for their
masters degree in public administra-
tion in accordance with the idea that
"democracy will be scuttled unless
the people get efficient administra-
tion of the laws passed by their elect-
ed representatives."
Institute Trains Administrators
Put into operation in July, the In-
stitute coordinates all University fa-
cilities so that students can better
prepare themselves for roles as ad-
ministrators in government. Some
students trained in professions which
will inevitably lead to public service,
supplement their professional work
with study of governmental admin-
istration.
Now, after three semesters of study
and one semester of field work they
will have had the opportunity to ob-
tain knowledge of administrative
methods through classes and sup-
plemented by instruction by public
officials brought to the Institute to
lecture and discuss operating prob-
lems with them.
"Administration is divided into two
parts," Betty Myerson, Vassar '43,
pointed out:
1)nGathering information on which
to plan, and
2) Actually doing the planning and
the job.
Government Needs Business Skills
"Government requires the same
kills as business,"she explained,"only
they are even more specialized. Since
the 'thirties with the rise of career
people in governmental offices, ef,
fective administration requires not
only putting the people into office
but seeing to it that they possess the
techniques necessary for the job."
"I hope professional training for
government will spread," she com-
mented, "and I think it will."
War experiences in particular have
led to increased interest in the prob-
lems of effective administration,
Donna Werback, a graduate of Mich-
igan State College, said. Her service
with the WACs during the war leads
her to believe that "The problems
faced by private or public adminis-
trators are the same as those running
all through the Army."
No Institute Courses Given
The students generally approved
the Institute's system of allowing
election of any course in any school
subject to the approval of the execu-
tive committee of the Institute.
Although ihere are several other
universities in the country offering
programs for graduate students,
Harding Hughes, University of North
Carolina '44, chose to study at Michi-
gan because of the close relationship
which he found existing between the
Institute and local government pub-
lie officials.
"Special recognition should be
made, of the value of the Bureau of
Government library for us in the In-
stitute," Oliver Comstock, ex-news-
oaper publisher, said. "Because of
the research constantly being done,
the library is filled with live pam-
phlets and newspaper clippings which
are certainly more interesting to the
student ofdadministrative problems
than a dead text."

SILENT LEWIS SITS IN SOLITUDE-While an apprehensive nation
girded itself for the rigors of a possible extended soft coal strike, United
Mine Workers Chief John L. Lewis sits quietly and alone in the lobby
of a Washington hotel, readjig a newspaper bannering coal crisis story.
'SPIRIT OF MODERN FRANCE:'
'U' Student Group Will Attend
Art Museum Exhibit int Toledo

If the- sun won't be dimmed by
Ann. Arbor's chronically cloudy wea-
ther Saturday, at least part of its
light will be temporarily obscured by
the new moon passing between it and
the earth.
The eclipse will begin about 10:30
a.m., reaching a maximum at high
noon when about fifty per cent of
the sun's disk will be covered, Hazel
Losh, of the astronomy department,
said yesterday. By 1:35 p.m., the sun
will be fully visible again if the
clouds have not taken over. Miss
Losh recommends that sun glasses be
used to obtain good results in ob-
servation.
Partial eclipses of this sort aren't
Center To Start
Sunday Supper
Reviving a pre-war custom, the In-
ternational Center will again serve
Sunday night supper to foreign stu-
dents and friends beginning this week
and every week following.
Supper will begin at 6:30 p.m.
There will be a charge of 50 cents per
person. Approximately 80 people will
be able to be served. The regular
Sunday evening program will follow
at 7:30 p.m. and will be open to the
public.
David Hildinger, boogie-woogie
pianist, will present selections on this
week's program to be held in Rm.
316 of the Union. A film on the de-
velopment of American Music will
also be shown.

unusual, Miss Losh pointed out. Prom
two to five are visible in various parts
of the world every year, but total
eclipses are much rarer. Total eclip-
ses of the moon are niuch more like-
ly to occur because of the much
greater size of the earth's shadow in
comparison to the moon.
Besides total and partial eclipses of
the sun, there is also what is known
as an "annular eclipse" in which the
disk of the moon is too small to com-
pletely cover the sun's face. These
only occur on rare occasions when
our satellite is at its greatest dis-
tance from the earth at the time of
the eclipse.
In ancient days, eclipses were con-
sidered bad omens. For example, if
the Ohio State-Michigan game were
being played in 150 B.C. instead of a
Saturday afternoon in 1946, Ann Ar-
bor sports fans might not be too
happy about it.
Hold Those Bonds!

Adams Cites
Ways To Meet
New Challenge
Special To The Dally
CHICAGO-A warning that mod-
ern challenges to education cannot
be met by rearranged curricula, en-
larged physical plants or the devel-
opment of new educational gadgets
was issued by Provost James P. Ad-
ams yesterday.
Provost Adams spoke on "New
Challenges to Education" at a dinner
meeting of the University Alumnae
Club of Chicago.
"The new challenges will be met
by the high faith and zeal of those
who search for truth and teach, and
by the earnest purpose of those who
come to learn," he declared.
"Our success will depend upon the
extent to which we can make dis-
coveries of truth," Provost Adams
explained, "and upon the vitality of
our teaching and its influence in the
lives of our students."
Education will succeed only if stu-
dents leave the campus with a "com-
pelling urge to continue their asso-
ciation with the realm of ideas," Pro-
vost Adams asserted.

The second group of University art
students to visit the Toledo Museum
of Art "Spirit of Modern France"
exhibit will go to the museum Sat-
urday to study the paintings there.
Already thirty-five students of the
French painting class from the Uni-
versity history of art department
have been among the thousands of
art enthusiasts who have enjoyed the
exhibit, Blake-More Godwin, director
of the Toledo Museum, said last Sat-
urday.
These French works of art are on
loan to the museum from Paris,
France, two Canadian communities
and 12 American cities. The paint-
ings depict the reactions of French
artists to the past 200 years of their
national history encompassing three
Alumni Plan
Dinner in Ohio
Michigan alumni activities before
the Michigan-Ohio State game Sat-
urday began with a smoker yesterday
in Toledo and will continue with a
dinner tomorrow night in Columbus,
according to T. Hawley Tapping, gen-
eral secretary of the Michigan Alum-
ni Association.
Tapping, hockey coach Vic Hey-
liger and ballplayer Dick Wakefield
were speakers at the annual Toledo
smoker. Prof. Ralph Aigler, of the
Law School, who recently returned
from a west coast athletic conference,
will speak at the University Club din-
ner in Columbus.

invasions and great economic and
political upheavals including the Re-
volution.
Under the sponsorship of the Tor-
onto Museum and Art Gallery, the
exhibit mnarks the first joint Canad-
ian-American effort to put on an art
show of this kind.
Church News
Several meetings are planned by
the student religious guilds today.
The Congregational-Disciples Guild
choir will meet at 5 p.m. at the Con-
gregational Church.
Members of the guild will meet for
a supper discussion at 5:30 p.m. at
the Guild house.
An open Kappa Phi meeting will
be held at 5:15 p.m. at the Method-
ist Church. Reservations may be
made on the bulletin board in the
church.
The Wesleyan Executive Council
will meet at r :15 p.m.
Officers of the Newman Club will
meet at 7 p.m. in the club rooms of
St. Mary's Chapel to discuss plans for
the "Western Dance" to be given Nov.
29.
Read and Use
The Daily Classifieds

12-13-14

r
"_°P3

- icecv'd7ote:
Beat your way to our door for your "Juke Box Jems"
. ..Harry James trumpets forth in "If I'm Lucky"
and "One More Kiss." You'll like "For You, For
Me, Forever More" and "A Kiss in the Night" done
as only Goodman and Lund can do it ... Stan Ken-
ton's latest, "Intermission Riff," and "It's a Pity To
Say Goodnight' is strictly all right. There's a nice
one, "It's All Over.Now" and "Either It's Love or It
Isn't" in a Frankie Carle way . . . Merle Travis'
"Divorce Me C.O.D." is on the list of favorites, too
. . . Krupa knocks out "There's No Breeze" with
"Aren't You Kind of Glad We Did?" . . . and
you'll be kind of glad you came in to hear the rest of
our popular, jazz and classical selections. See You at
RADIO AND RECORD SHOP
715 North University, Phone 3542
North End of the Diagonal - Ann Arbor

BOOK MATCHES
. . . for . . .
CHRISTMAS
Can be mailed to your friends
like Christmas cards. PERSON-
ALIZED with your own name
on them. So new, so different,
and economical, too! (We fur-
nish U.S. approved mailing con-
tainers.)
Ramsey -Canufield, Inc.
119 EAST LIBERTY

11

i

I

RMH

'S

ad a1 cher's

I

.I

TONIGHT 8:30 P.M.

Avoid Rough, Dry
Chapped Face and
Hands ...

DRUGS - COSMETICS -GIFTS
Clearance of OPA-Priced Merchandise
FRIDAY and SATURDAY, NOV., 22 and 23

OPA Price $6.10
ELECTRIC
TRAVEL

OPA Price $4.85
ELECTRIC
TOASTERS

OPA Price $5.50
ELECTRIC
HEATING
PADS
$3.95

IRON

$4.95

$2.95

11

OA Price $7.95
ELECTRIC

OPA Price $2.50
ELECTRIC
CURLING

HEAT
LAMPS
$5.95

U. ofM.
SEAL
STATIONERY
60 SHEETS
50 ENVELOPES
$1.00

IRONS
$1..59

FISCHER'S LANOLATED CREAM LOTION
Prevent dryness and you prevent chap.
Contains pure Lanolin. Non-sticky.
8oz...35c

COMPLETE STOCK OF REVLON - MAX FACTOR
LIPSTICKS - PANCAKE - NAIL ENAMEL

Brig. General Roger Ramey
"AIR POWER IN THE ATOMIC AGE"

I

DOMESTIC

COU RTLEY

FISCHER'S HAND CREAM

CUSTOM-BI LT
nnA

11111

I I

11

II I nnU 11 m I1

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan