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November 17, 1946 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-11-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1946

'M '-Badger
Sidel ghis
Bob Mann, an end until yesterday
obscured in the seemingly inexausti-
ble supply of Maize and Blue ends,
made 62,000 shivering fans forget the
others by turning in the most im-
pressive performance of any player on
either squad.
Among other things, Mann
snagged two passes for touchdowns
and ran 20 yards on an end around.
He was all alone on Wisconsin's 34
when he stepped just a shade out
of bounds, twisting and turning
like a veteran halfback.
Former Wolverine football and
baseball star Bob Nussbaumer, to-
gether with other members of the
Green Bay Packers eleven watched
the game from the pressbox. Among
them was Merv Pregulman, a Lan-
sing boy who played a good deal of
tackle and center around here a few
years ago.
* * *
The fourth period of the contest
was more than a little costly to the
Wolverines. On the eighth play of
the quarter, Bump Elliott, who had
stood out in the backfield all after-
noon, came up wtih an injured an-
kle.
Coach Crisler shipped Paul White
in at right half and two plays later
White's bad knee was twisted and he
was replaced by Ralph Chubb, who a
few, moments later, was injured.
Fonde replaced Chubb, with the dope-
sters speculating on the possibility of
converting Bob Mann to right half
for the OSU game.
Following Bob Wiese's punt
which rolled out of bounds on the
Badger 2-yard line, Wally Weber
turned to his son and declared,
"Who said they ought to take the
punt out of football?"

Cadets, Swamp
Quakers, 34-7
Davis Turns in Finest
Performance of Year
Galloping Glenn Davis with his
Army playmates turned in one of
their more sizzling shows yesterday,
and marched to a 34 to 7 victory over
the ponderous Penn gridders. Yes-
terdays game was strictly a Davis
show.
The California comet did practical-
ly everything as he scored two touch-
downs himself, forward-passed for
another and lateralled for a fourth
and put on what comes close to being
the top performance of his career.
When it wasn't Davis taking the
Penns apart, it was his running mate,
Doc (the Monster) Blanchard belt-
ing away at the line, or Arnold Tuck-
er, the unsung quarterback, pitching
passes until he injured his leg and
had to be relieved.
Against the bottom-of-the-barrel
Army reserves, Penn managed a
touchdown when Rodney Adams
broke through to block a Cadet punt
on the West Point 24. The ball rolled
over the end zone and end Frank
Jenkins fell on it.
Big Nie
Stand~igs

Nation's Grid Scores
EAST Alabama 12, Vanderbile 7
Columbia 46, Lafayette 0 Kentucky 13, West Virginia 0
Penn State 12, Navy 7 MIDWEST
New York University 33, Fordham 28 Ohio Wesleyan 39, Denison 0
Yale 30, Princeton 2 Nebraska 33, Iowa State 0
Cornell 21, Dartmouth 7 Minnesota 16, Iowa 6
Colgate 25, Syracuse 7 Cincinnati 34, Western Reserve 7
Temple 27 Bucknell 6 SOUTHWEST
Georgetown 35, Scranton 7 Arkansas 13, S.M.U. 0
Tennessee 33, Boston College 13 Texas Tech 14, Oklahoma A&M 7
Rutgers 55, Lehigh 6 Oklahoma 27, Missouri 6
Harvard 28, Brown 0 Rice 27, Texas A&M 10
William & Mary 20, George Wash- Tulsa 17, Baylor 0
ington 0 FARWEST
SOUTH Arizona 13, New Mexico 13 (tie)
Duke 39, South Ctarolina 0 Denver 13, Colorado 13 "(tie)
North Carolina 26 Wake Forest 14 Washington 16, Oregon 0
North Carolina State 27, Virginia 7 U.C.L.A. 61, Montana 7
Georgia Tech 35, Tulane 7 Idaho 20, Portland University 6
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Michigan Still in Title Race; Chappuis
Nears Conference Offensive Mark

(Continued from Page 1)

pass and was run out of bounds on the
13 by Don Kindt. Weise on a spinner
gained nothing. Bump Elliott started
around left end, stopped and pitched
a pass to Mann in the end zone.
Brieske added the point and the
Maize and Blue led, 7-0.
In less than eight minutes the Wol-
verines had scored again. Wisconsin
received the kick-off and marched to
two first downs before its attack
stalled at mid-field. Cox again boot-
ed to Chappuis on the 17 who ran up
the sideline to the Michigan 39. This
time it took the Maize and Blue just
seven plays to push across the touch-
down.
Chappuis Tossed Touchdown Pass
Chappuis faked a pass and ran to
the Badger 47. Two more running
plays and he had a first down on their
30. Two incomplete passes and
Weise's buck for three yards made it
fourth and seven. But Chappuis
passed to Mann who was alone in
the end zone for Michigan's second
tally.
Chappuis took a lateral from Yer-
ges and went down the sideline be-
hind beautiful blocking for 46 yards-
the longest run from scrimmage for
the Wolverines this season-to the

Wisconsin 23. Two running plays
failed and a pass fell incomplete.
Chappuis' fourth down pass to Bump
Elliott failed by inches to make it a
first down, and the Badgers finally
had halted the Michigan attack.
Wolverine Threaten Again
Michigan threatened twice more in
the half when it marched to the
Badgers' 24 and 15 but failed to score.
Wisconsin played the entire half in its
own territory, unable to advance the
ball beyond the fifty yard stripe.
Taking the ball on their own 37
after Weise's punt out the Wisconsin
club started moving. Lisle Blackbourn
and Kindt tarried the ball for a first
down on the Michigan 48. Two passes
gave them another on the 33. Black-
bourn then tossed a pass to Jack
Wink on the goal line for the Badg-
ers' only score. Blackbourn's try for
the extra point was blocked.
From the kick-off Michigan drove
67 yards to the Wisconsin three yard
stripe, highlighted by a 39 yard pass
from Bumps Elliott to Mann. With
a first down on the eight the drive
was again halted, however, by a stub-
born Badger defense, and the Wol-
verines lost the ball on downs.
After an exchange of punts the
period ended without any further
Michigan threats.

Cox's long punt had the Maize and
Blue back on their own ten to start
the final quarter. But again the Wol-
verines began marching. It was in
this march that both Bumps Elliott
and White were injured. Bump turned
his ankle after racing for a 23 yard
gain. White was hurt two plays lat-
er.
With the Maize and Blue stopped
at mid-field Weise kicked out on the
Wisconsin two yard line, and after
Cox got away a kick from the end
zone the Wolverines scored again.
Gene Derricotte returned the kick
to the Wisconsin 30. Dick Rifenburg,
on an end around swept to the seven.
Three plays later Dworsky bulled his
way over.
Ed McNeill's interception of Stan
Heath's pass started the Wolverines
on their final goalward march. With
Derricotte doing most of the run-
ning and passing they moved to the
Wisconsin 25 yard line. Then came
the climax " play of the game. On
fourth down Derricotte failed to pass.
He was trapped behind the line but
eluded several would-be-tacklers and
scampered down the sideline to the
two. Ford carried it over on an end
around play. Brieske's kick concluded
the game's scoring.

# fI

(Continued from page 4)
The new constitution will be pre-
sented to the membership. All mem-
bers of the Pep Club and former
members of the Wolverines are ur-
gently requested to attend this meet-
ing. All students who are interested
in promoting school spirit at foot-
ball, basketball, and hockey games
are invited to attend.
One-Act Plays to be presented by
the Department of Speech Tuesday
night will include "Sunday Supple-
ment," "Will-O'-The-Wisp," and
"The Dear Departed." Directed and
staged by students in the advanced
courses in dramatics, the plays will
be given in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre. Admission free. Tickets
may be obtained at the theatre box
office Tuesday from 10-5 and 7:30-
8:30.

Modern Dance Club meeting
7:30 p. m., Mon., Barbour Gym.

at

W L T PCT PTS

Illinois.......
MICHIGAN ..
Indiana ......
Ohio State ....
Iowa .........
Northwestern .
Wisconsin ....
Minnesota ...
Purdue ......

5
4
3
2
3
2
2
2
0

1
1
2
2
3
2
4
4
4

0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
1

.833
.750
.600
.500
.500
.500
.333
.333
.100

113
10'7
42
106
63
89
78
45
48

OP
58
40
47
86
44
67
131
108
110

(Ties count half game won and
half game lost.)

f .

1946-47 LECTURE COURSE
P r e s e n t s
BRIG. GENERAL ROGER RAMEY
Commander of the World's Only Atomic Bomb Attack Force
"AIR POWER IN THE ATOMIC AGE"
THURSDAY, 8:30 P.M.
Tickets $1.20 - 90c - 60c (tax incl.)
Box Office Open Wednesday and Thursday
HILL AUDITORIUM

II

Churches
First Presbyterian Church:
10:45 a. m.: Morning Worship.
Sermon topic: "Our Everlasting
Yea," by Dr. Lemon.
4:30 p. m.: Vesper Communion
Service. The Session wil meet in
the Lewis Parlor at 3:45 p. m. to
greet those who are uniting with the
church. Westminster Guild supper
hour in the Social Hall following
Communion Service.
First Congregational Church
Rev. Leonard A. Par, D.D., Minis-
ter. 9:30 a. in., Men's Discussion
Group: Preston Slosson speaks on
"The U.N. and World Peace." 10:45
a.m., Morning worship, "The Silence
of Eternity," by Dr. Parr.
Memorial Christian Church (Dis-
ciples of Christ) Hill and Tappan
Streets.
Morning worship at 10:50 a. in.,
Rev. F. E. Zendt preaching on "Men
and Missions."
The Congregational - Disciples
meet at 6:00 p. m. Dr. Theodore
Newcomb, of the University Depart-
ment of Sociology, will speak on
"What's Wrong With Man?" Follow-
ing the supper, the Young Married
Couples Group will meet with Dr.
E. W. Blakeman, Counselor in Re-
ligious Education for the University,
to discuss plans for future programs.
University Lutheran Chapel:
9:45 and 11:00 a.m., Morning
Worship. Sermon topic, "Faith is
Counted for Righteousness," by Rev.
Alfred Scheips.
Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, supper meeting at 5:15, Stu-
dent Center. The Rev. Werner Kuntz
of Detroit, will speak.
First Unitarian Church:
Edward H. Redman, Minister.
11:00 a. m., Service of Worship: Ser-
mon by Rev. Edward H. Redman on
the overseas work of the Unitarian
Service Committee and the need for
redoubled relief efforts.
12:15 p. in., Annual Meeting of the
Congregation.
6:30 p. in., Unitarian Students
with Prof. Throop on "Ancient Phil-
osophies Preserved in Christianity."
First Church of Christ Scientist,
409 S. Division St.
Sunday morning service at 10:30.
Subject, "Mortals and Immortals."
Sunday School at 11:45.
Wednesday evening service at 8:00.
Unity: 11:00 a.m., Service of Wor-
ship: Unity Reading Rooms, 310 S.
State St.
Subject: "Aggressive Christianity."
7:00 p. m., Student Discussion
Group, Reading Rooms.
The Meeting of Friends will be
held Sunday afternoon at four
o'clock on the third floor of the
First Presbyterian Church. At six
there will be a discussion group
meeting at the Dunham home for
young Friends. All student Friends
and visitors are invited to both
meetings.

Ii1' .,iiI

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Iii_

A THOUGHT FOR CHRISTMAS:
1947 MICHIGAN CALENDAR
fo, on 4$.5
12 oBEAUTIFUL VIEWS OF THE MICHIGAN CAMPUS
POSTAGE PAID TO ANY PLACE IN AMERICA

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