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November 08, 1946 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-11-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1944

Highlights
On Campus
Newcomb To S peak .
Following Sabbath Eve Services at
7.45 p.m.. today, Prof. Theodore M.
Newcomb will address members of
the B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation on
"Pride-Prejudice" in a Fireside Dis-
cussion.
* . *
Dance Committee . ..
The West Lodge Dance Commit-
tee will hold its weekly meeting at
5 p.m. Monday in the League.
The room number will' be posted
on the bulletin board.
Weekly Tea Dance . .
The International Center will hold
its weekly tea dance from 4 to 6 p.m.
today in the social rooms of the
Center. All foreign students and
friends are invited to attend.
** *
Girl Scout Tea...
The Girl Scout Council of Ann
Arbor will honor Kay Beckman,
new executive director of the Coun-
cil, at a tea from 2 to 4 p.m. today
in the Rackham Bldg.
Miss Beckman is a former mem-
ber of the National Girl Scout Staff
of Chicago.
Mrs. Beatrice Price Russell, a
member of the District Committee
of Scouts in Southport, Conn., will
be guest speaker at the tea.
Scalp and Blade ..
Scalp and Blade will meet at 7 p.m.
Sunday in the Union to discuss rush-
ing plans.
All old members have been asked
to attend.
Student Officers
Will Meet Here
Officers of High School Student
Councils throughout the state will
hold a conference Nov. 15 in the
Rackham Building under the sponsor-
ship of the University Extension
Service, the education school, and
the student council officers of Uni-
versity High School and Ann Arbor
High School.
The general topic for discussion
will be 'How To Make High School
Student Councils More Effective."
Specific topics to be discussed will
be "How To Promote Broader Par-
ticipation in Student Council Work,"
"Why Student Councils Fail". and
similar subjects related to the func-
tioning of high school student coun-
cils.

LIMIT ED TOP JOBS:
Schools Should Teach Facts
Of Industrial Life, Sexton Says

American school children need to
be taught the "industrial facts of
life," including the fact that there
are a limited number of jobs "on top"
and that it is possible for a man to be
happy on $1.25 an hour, Brendan
Sexton, regional Educational repre-
sentative of the UAW-CIO, said yes-
terday.
Speaking at the Conference on
Vocational Education, Sexton de-
clared that the schools should com-
bat the prevalent idea that a suc-
cessful life is measured only in
terms of income..
"We in the trade union movement
have a right to expect that children
shall be taught that it is no disgrace
to be a part of the American indus-
trial machine," Sexton said.
In particular, school courses
should inform young people that
unions exist, and should teach
something of their functions and of
the principles of collective bar-
gaining.
"We do not ask that the schools be
pro-union, any more than we think
Hold Those Bonds!

that they should be pro-manage-
ment," he said, "but in a country
where there are 15,000,000 trade un-
ion members, we believe we have the
right to expect the schools to show a
sympathetic approach to the whole
labor movement."
P re-Game Air
Show Planned
Approximately 20 Navy planes-
Corsairs, Hellcats, and Avengers-
will fly in a pre-game air show to
begin at 1:36 p.m. tornorrow over the
stadium.
The planes, which spelled out a
block "M" and block "I" at the Illi-
nois game Oct. 26, this time will dis-
play combat and parade formations
used by Marine and Naval pilots in
air tactics.
The planes will be piloted by mem-
bers of the Naval and Marine Or-
ganized Air Reserve based at Grosse
Ile. Some of the pilots are University
students who are maintaining their
reserve commissions by flying week-
ends at Gro"se"le.
In the event of bad weather, the
show will not be given.

.l

JAMMED REGISTRATION-This situation will persist for years to come, according to Dr. Benjamin Fine, education editor of The New York
Times who holds that 3,000,000 students will throng to U.S. colleges and universities by 1950. Educators must stop thinking that the 'good old
days' of lowered enrollment will ever return, Fine said.
4) .'4 * * *

'A PIPE DREAM:'

Technic Will
Make First
Appearance*
Resplendent in a new cover, the
Michigan Technic, engineering stu-
dents publication, will make its first
fall appearance on campus Mon-
day.
The first issue will feature a "Time
and Motion Study" by Arthur Jones.
The article is a general analysis of
the methods of promoting greater
production efficiency used by engi-
neers to save consumers millions of
dollars every year.
Also featured will be a discussion
of "Silicones" by Ted Gier. The ar-
ticle presents a brief historical sum-
mary of the development of sili-
cones, explains the production flow-
sheet and includes the uses of the new
compounds.

Fine Attacks Educators' Hope
For Return of 'Good Old Days'

(Continued from Page 1)

not adjust quickly enough to veter-
ans' needs."
'The veterans have produced, now
it's upto the colleges to produce," he
asserted.
If there were no veterans in high-
er educational institutions, the col-
lege administrators would be clamor-
ing for them, Dr. Fine pointed out.
"I can't think of anything more
promising in terms of the nation's
future than the veterans who have
thrown down their guns and re-
placed them with books," he said.
We could and should have 6,000,000
college students, he stated.
"This idea will meet with opposi-
tion," Dr. Fine said. "But there was
opposition to extension of high school
education in 1872, and that plan has
worked out well."

We cannot as a nation allow a
feeling to persist that higher edu-
cation must be limited to a few, he
stated.
"New and expanded colleges must
come about," he said.
"Educators are just beginning to
think along those lines- they are just
beginning to come our of their lethar-
gy," the Pulitzer Prize winner said.
The surface has not yet been
scratched as far as enrollment in col-
leges and universities is concerned,
Dr. Fine added.

FLOWERS
0 0
Ior the Game
... for theDan
CHELSEA
FLOWER SHOP
04;;; Qec e

TON ITE at 8 P.M.
MASONIC TEMPLE
JAZZC'het
. ..CARLTON RYDING SEXTET...
JOE NORRIS QUARTET. .
DAVE LEVINE'S QUINTET...
BOB MAYREND'S TRIO ..
.BETTY BONNIER...
Also:
Bobl Baldwin, Leo Osebald, Bud Casey
DON SLAUGHTER, BILL SPENCER
Presented by BILL RAN DLE
$1.20 . . . AT THE DOOR . . . $1.20

(I -- _-__ _______ ____ _______________ _ _________________i

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