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November 03, 1946 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-11-03

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN IjATTY

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1946

U

Nurse School
Discontinues
Capping Rite
Full Uniform Will Be
Given at Start of Work
The capping ceremony, one of the
nursing school's oldest traditions, has
been discontinued this year.
This was done in conjunction with
other changes designed to improve
the school's program.
The capping ceremony has been
symbolic of the student's complete
acceptance after a period of trial. It
was held at the end of the probation-
ary period after the student had
worked on the hospital wards. Now
the full uniform, including cap, will
be given when work in the hospital
is begun.
There are no records as to why the
cap should have been considered the
badge of acceptance, or why nurses
have always worn them. It is be-
lieved that the cap may have come
from the coif worn by the nursing
sisters or from the caps worn by all
women in Victorian period when
nurses' training was inaugurated.
Caps vary slightly among different
hospitals.
Other changes in the School of
Nursing have been made with the
object of decelerating and improving
the program. Students will be given
two university semesters of pre-clini-
cal training instead of six months.
During the first two semesters they
will have 100 hours of laboratory
clinical practice. The school is also
offering a special course for stu-
dents in the degree program.

TOKYO ROSE SUSPECT RELEASED - Ikuko Togura, graduate of
UCLA in 1941, arrested in Japan a year ago as "Tokyo Rose" who broad-
cast from Tokyo during the war, is escorted from Sugamo prison in
Tokyo, Japan, by an unidentified guard after being freed because Los
Angeles federal authorities said there were at least 12 "Tokyo Roses"
and they wouldn't narrow the field to one.
STRICT DIET OPPOSED:-
Wilson Advocates Alloing
Children To Choose Foods

Townspeople
Ignorant of
Admendments
Admit Press, Radio
Have Publicized Issues
(Continued from Page 1)
in the improvement of certain pub-
lic roads, waterways and aeronauti-
cal facilities, to control waterways
for purposes of drainage and public
health, and to take part in land im-
provement projects.
The second proposal provides that
one-sixth of sales tax proceeds be
returned to localities on a population
basis, another one-sixth to school
districts, and in addition sets a mini-
mum state appropriation for public
schools of 46 per cent of the sales
tax proceeds for the preceding year.
The third proposal would author-
ize the bonding of the state to the
sum of not more than $270,000,000
for a veterans bonus.
Interest appeared greatest on the
sales tax amendment. Only one per-
son opposed this proposal after its
meaning was explained. Those who
voiced approval gave as reasons their
beliefs that the amendment would
result in deservedly higher salaries
for teachers and that a tax collect-
ed on a wide base from persons of
all economic levels should be for pur-
poses such as educational improve-
ment.
However, the well-informed teach-
er said that he did not consider the
sales tax a fair revenue technique. A
tool-grinder, who voiced disapproval
of this type of tax, said that it un
fairly burdened families with low in-
comes. A machine-operator said that
although he did not like the tax, "it
certainly does hook in the money."
In contrast to these opinions, a
University purchasing agent said that
he considers the sales tax a fair dis-
tribution of burden since it places
some responsibility on persons who
otherwise would not pay taxes. He
included University students in that
group.
One veteran and several house-
wives expressed approval of the vet-
erans' bonus amendment. No one
showed sufficient interest to com-
ment on the public-projects pro-
posal. Seven persons refused to an-
swer any questions after they learned
the nature of the interviews.

CENTER LECTURE:
China Today' To Be Subject
Of Mrs. George Fitch's Talk

it

ANNOUNCEMENT!
JAMES GEORGE
formerly from the
Allenel Hotel Barber Shop
is managing the
MOE BARBER SHOP
at 320 South State St.,
during
Mr. Moe's illness.

Small children should be allowed
to choose their food instead of be-
ing held to a strict diet, Dr. James
L. Wilson said yesterday at a meet-
ing of the Michigan Dietetic Associ-
ation.
Dr. Wilson, who is chairman of the
Department of Pediatrics and Com-
municable Diseases, said that chil-
dren at the age of four or five years
lose their appetites soonest when all
power of choice is taken away and
they are held down to a strict diet.
"Once the child learns he can again

favor with his mother by eating
what she feeds him," he said, "he will
hold out and not eat all his food in
order to obtain favors for himself. He
added that "the child almost always
wins in a clash of wills between his
mother and himself."
"The important thing to remem-
ber when permitting the chad to pick
his foods," the doctor asserted, "is to
let him eat only during regular meal
times."
Mothers have a tendency to over-
feed small children, according to Dr.
Wilson, who pointed out that al-
though the child grows tremendously
in his early years, in reality, the
calorie intake at that age tends to
fall off.

UNWANTED HAIR
Permanently Removed!
Short wave method-Faster, Painless
Phone 6373
First National Bldg.

Mrs. George A. Fitch, writer and
lecturer on China, will discuss
"China Today" at 7:30 p.m. today in
the International Center.
Bcrn and educated in Michigan,
Mrs. Fitch has lived in China over
20 years, including three and a half
months spent there last winter.
While in Shanghai, Mrs. Fitch was
feature writer for the leading Eng-
lish daily newspaper, book reviewer
for the "China Weekly Review" and
president of the American Associa-
tion of University Women.
In 1939 she testified before the
Senate Foreign Relations Commit-
tee and the House Foreign Affairs
Committee against sending war ma-
terials to Japan.
In 1930 Mrs. Fitch was chosen by
Chinese women as a delegate to the
Pan-Pacific Women's Conference in
Honolulu.
She is a contributing editor of the
"China Monthly," vice-president of
the American China Policy Associa-
tion, and a member of the Overseas
Press Club of New York.
Mrs. Fitch will be introduced by
Li Bei-tsung, graduate student in
zoology. The lecture is being present-
ad under the auspices of China Unit-
ed Services and the International
Center. A reception will follow the
lecture.
Pollock Praises
UN Assembly
The "energy and spirit of hope-
fulness" exhibited at the opening ses-
sions of the United Nations Assembly
"gave me a very favorable impres-
sion," Prof. James K. Pollock, of the
political science department, stated
yesterday.
Prof. Pollock just returned from
New York, where he spent a week
sitting in on assembly sessions.
The assembly "gives promise of de-
veloping into a useful organ of world
opinion," he said, as well as bringing
about a "better cooperative spirit"
among great powers.
Foreign Minister Molotov's dis-
armament proposal was accepted by
Sen. Austin with "significant"
amendments, Prof. Pollock pointed
out, but it is a beginning in this
"important" field.
"The American delegation," he de-
clared, "is very attentive and hard-
working. Both in ability and repre-
sentatives, they are equal to the dele-
gation of any other nation." Prof.
Pollock also praised the work of Sec-
retary-General Trygve Lie and his
staff in handling administrative
matters.
Russky Kruzhok To Meet
At International Center
Russky Kruzhok, the Russian Cir-
cle, will meet at 8 p.m. tomorrow at
the International Center.
Following a short business meet-
ing, there will be singing, and refresh-
ments will be served.
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MRS. GEORGE A. FITCH
. . . to lecture here

Adaptability of
Veteran Lauded
By Dean Walter
(Continued from Page 1)
lenient treatment and easy grading.
"Concrete proof of his interest in
quality" is offered by Dean Walter
in mentioning the all-A records for
last year, when it was found that
four veterans had earned perfect
records in the fall, twenty in the
spring, and 55 in the surnmer.
The challenge to the non-veteran
freshman is evident, according to
Dean Walter, in that "competition
to remain above average has been
made keener by the serious effort
that the veteran injects into his class
preparation and class participation."
The freshman, having "moved into
the big league," Dean Walter says,
must therefore accept the challenge
at "the new university level." If a
freshman meets in his classes "the
men whose sacrifices made possible
the continuation of free university
work in our country," Dean Walter
declares, "the experience will be an
added privilege."

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Classified Advertising

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LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Ten-inch K. & E. Log-Log Duplex
Decitrig slide rule, Tuesday evening,.
probably in Union basement. Substan-
tial reward.Please return to or call Don
Resnick, 1034 E. Huron. 7331. )
REWARD: $5.00, for lost address book,
black, 2x5; name on inner cover. Oliver
Comstock, 7443 Michigan Ave., Saline,
phone 184-F-13.
LOST: Modern Exposition Book I, inNat.
Science Bldg. Picase return to B. South-
worth, 829 Tappan, phone 8321. . )2
LOST: Gray Shaeffer fontain pen. Call
2-2591, Room 301 Betsy Barbour. Re-
ward. )5
LOST-A black Scottie dog answering
name Cinder. Some grey hair. Please
return or call. Mrs. E. G. Heisel, 632
Church. Phone 8325. Reward. )21
LOST: Narrow rhinestone bracelet between
I-M Building and Union Saturday
night. Reward. Box 29, Daily. )1l
LOST: Scroll design linked gold bracelet.
Excellent reward. Audrey Burnard, 2-4471
)9
_ BUSINESS SERVICES
ELECTROLUX VACUUM CLEANERS
Sales - Jon Jadwin - Service
855 Tappan Phone 2-7412 or 2-2683
)41
TYPEWRITERS, offide machines cleaned,
repaired. Work guarenteed. Three-day
service. Calculators sold and rented.
Pick-up and delivery, Office Equipment
Service Co., 111 S. 4th Ave., 2-12i3. )26
TYPING: Term papers, theses, manu-
scripts. Stenographic work. Call 7147,
9-12, 1:30-4:30. )63
FOR SALE
YOR ,,SALE: Beautiful home-raised canar-
ies, parakeets and finches, bird supplies
and cages. Male Persian cat. 562 S. 7th
Phone 5330. )10
NEED AN APARTMENT? Have a 2-family
house for sale which has one apartment
vacant. Reasoiable terms. Oril Fergu-
son, Realtor, 928 Forest Ave, Phone
2-~2839. ) 12

HELP WANTED
WOULD LOW COST ATTRACTIVE, NOUR-
ISHING MEALS INTEREST YOU? Why
not work for a concern with a Company-
owned, non-profit cafeteria for operat-
ors, such as the Michigan Bell Telephone
Co. Eat meat at 18 cents a serving, sal-
ads for .12, vegetables for .08 to .10, des-
serts for .08 to .10, beverage for .05.
Snacks available on relief periods. At
the same time help your digestion by
eating in the pleasant company of our
congenial operators. Inquire about our
openings in operating positions by call-
ing 9900 or 9985. )15
WANTED: Delivery boys for Michigan
Daily. Good pay. Apply Circulation Dept.
Student Publications Bldg., 420 Maynard
St., or call 2-3241. )13
WANTED
WANTED: 4 adjacent Ohio State-Michigan
tickets. Telephone 25-7084. C. S. Stoll. )2
MEN'S USED CLOTHES wanted. A better
price paid. Sam's Store, 122 E. Wash-
ington St. )14
TAILORING and SEWING
CUSTOM MADE CLOTHES-Formals-Re-
modeling-Alterations. "Bring your sew-
ing problems to us." Hildegarde Shop,
116 E. Huron, 24669. )45
SEWING, altering and remodeling women's
garments, excepting coats and articles
made from black materials. 9 a.m. to
9 p.m., excepting Fridays. Miss Living-
ston, 315 S. Division, 2nd floor front. )6
MISCELLANEOUS
MIDWAY Bicycle shop, 322 E. Liberty. We
have rebuilt used bikes for sale. Your
bike can be expertly repaired also. )56
Shipment of
PARKER 51 PENS
Just Arrited
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