100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 02, 1946 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-11-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

016- - I

THE- .~ ~...~. N.U L' M C I k.. . 33 .AN A .

I J

_ r

AY, NOVEMBER % 1949

Ift A eAlm 0*

t i1JE.l U111 \TANl\LH1L1.T

PAG*E SEVEN

I

,

If(JUPNJG(LE
Increased Taxes Predicted
If Vets' Bonus Bill Is Passed

The Michigan Survey, a state tax-
payers' organziation, has predicted
that the proposed veterans' bonus
amendment No. 3 may prove "a
bccndoggle instead of a boon" to
Michigan's 640,000 veterans.
Henry Steffens, director of the
Survey, told The Daily yesterday that
new or higher taxes are "inevitable"
under the proposal to pay a $10 per
month bonus for domestic service
yatt Struggles
With IFC over
Housing Loans
Threatens To Serve
Directive on Agency
WASHINGTON, Nov. 1 -(') -~
Housing Expediter Wilson Wyatt
went to the mat with the Reconstruc-
tion Finance Corporation tonight in
a struggle over the granting of $54,-
000,000 in loans to launch an assem-
bly-line housing industry.
RFC refused to grant a $32,000,000
credit to the Lustron Corporation of
Chicago as well as smaller loans to
other prefabricators despite Wyatt's
recommendation that the money be
made available.
Directives Discussed
In a late day conference with the
RFC board of directors, Wyatt threat-
ened to serve a directive on the'loan
agency, forcing compliance through
the extraordinary powers vested in
him by the Emergency Housing (Pat-
man) act.
That information came from other
officials. Wyatt issued only this brief
statement after the session:
"The matter of directives was dis-
cussed with the RFC Board as well
as loans. Other discussions will be
held in the next few days."
The fate of Wyatt's whole effort to
develop mass production of steel and
aluminum houses apparently hinged
on the outcome, for virtually all the
firms entering the new field want
federal financing.
New Subsidy
Meanwhile Wyatt announced thata
three new "premium payment" sub-
sidy plans would go into effect this
month, providing federal funds for
extra output of galvanized sheet steel,
carbon sheet steel, and some mill-
work items needed in the housing
drive.?
It appeared that other efforts oft
the housing chief to help the Lus-r
tron Corporation-which he regards
as the best bet for an early start in'
assembly-line housing-will soon be
contested in court.X
* * *1
Resort Owners
Aid Is SoughtF
WASHINGTON, Nov. 1-(/P) -
Housing Expediter Wilson W. Wyattl
appealed today to operators of sum-
mer resorts to give veterans short-f
term leases during the winter sea-f
sol.
This, he said in a statement, would
provide thousands of interim quar-
ters and temporarily relieve thet
housing shortage this winter.U
Furthermore, Wyatt added, sum-o
mer resort operators could command
higher rental rates in rent control
areas if they would rehabilitate or
install new heating equipment and
convert their living units into year-E
round housing. Those who do notn
follow this line, he said, could givev
short-term leases for off-seasont
months and obtain possession for
the summer trade.p
Winter rentals would be fixed ati
current ceilings, if ceilings apply in L
the particular areas.|h

and a $15 per month bonus for over.
seas service to every veteran wh<
served between Sept. 16, 1940 an
June 30, 1946.
Aid Temporary
"About all that can be said in fa.
vor of this amendment," Steffen
said, "is that it does do somethinl
for the veteran-if he is short-sight-
ed."
He pointed out that the bonus wil
ost taxpayers at least $343,500,000
T $73,500,000 more than is to be pro-
ided by the proposed $270,000,00(
onus bond issue.
tlli Limitations
Labeling the amendment "hastily
onsidered" Steffens listed these im-
)erfections in the bonus proposal:
1. Although the original plan wa
lased on 3640,000 Michigan veterans
his figure may be increased by more
han 50,000 'step-child' veterans who
nay qualify on grounds that they
lived here for six months or more
;rior to induction even though they
came from other states.
2. The original computation wa
made using Dec. 31, 1945 as the las
service date fo which a bonus would
be paid. In its haste to place the
question on the ballot, the legisla-
ture advanced this date six months
to June 30, 1946. This is likely to
increase costs by $25,000,000, Stef-
fens thinks.
3. Administration of this plan will
;robably extend over a period of 50
years because of the benefit provi-
ions for service-connected disabili-
ies and payment to surviving de-
)endent relatives. If a veteran dies
30 years afterwards from a war-in-
2urred injury, compensation could
legally be claimed under provisions
:f the amendment.
China Civil War
Is InLtensified
Government Forces
Gain in Manchuria
PEIPING, Nov. 1 - (/3) - Gov-
,rnment forces today tightened the
isolation of Communist-held South-
;rn Manchuria and reinforced their
ffort to seize Chefoo from the Reds
as the civil war intensified in other
treas.
Pro-government dispatches said
orward elements of Gen. Tu Li-
Mings' Manchurian army had en-
tered Pulantien, on the railroad 33
miles north of Dairen, the free port
:ccupied by the Russians after Japan
Surrendered.
The vanguaTd: at Pulantien were
part of Tu's western column, which
'as been rolling southward on the
,'Iukden-Dairen railroad. This force
previously had been reported at
Hiungyao, about 60 miles north of
Pulantien.
This column, and another advanc-
ing down the eastern seaboard of the
Liatung Peninsula, steadily were iso-
lating that Communist-held area of
Southern Manchuria. Informed
forces said several days ago the two
forces had thrown a line across the
peninsula.
Government souces have made it
dlear that Tu's armies have no inten-
tion of entering Dairen but will set
up a safety zone outside the Russian
occupation area.
French Plane Crashes
LIMOGES, France, Nov. 1--(/P)-
Eighteen passengers and three crew-
men of a Paris-Casablanca plane
were killed today when it crashed in
the mountainous region near here.
Air officials said the French trans-
port plane crashed just before noen
in the hills above the village of St.
Leger La Montagne, 25 miles from
here. There were no survivors.

Camrpu s Mystery
Missing: one. fire-hydrant.
No one seems to know what
happened to it or when it disap-
peared. But members of the plant
department, making' their yearly
pre-winter check of campus water
outlets to repair possible freez-
points, discovered a hydrant out-
let snapped off above the ground
valve. They also found that the
outlet was not on their blue-
prints of campus water lines.
The outlet turned out to be the
only city fire-plug on campus.
City repair men investigated yes-
terday and were last seen using a
radio pin-detelor to find the
oufls eounec~uen to an Ann Ar-
borwLmi- mia

TURE NLtws

t

ASSOCIATED

PRESS

Predecessor of
VJi VUsiJsed in
Si
,O - 870
eb
Beleaguered Parisians read the
home edition of the London Tnimes
on Christmas morning, 1870, from
copies of enlarged microprints sent
from London by carrier pidgeo, ex-
s hibits from the permanent collec-
tions of the Clement's Library indi-
cate.
"The Parisians wanted to vead the
'agony columns' to find out the fate
of their friends and relatives out-
side," R. G. Adams, Curator of the
Library explained.
During the siege which began in
November 1870, an early equivaernt
of V-Mail letters were used to con-
tact members of the French armed
forces outside by the families and
friends of the Parisians. First pro-
clamation of the Constitution of the
Third Republic were similarly flown
from Bordeaux by the Provisional
National Government under Gam-
betka in 1871.
Microfilm was invented by M.
Dagron. They were made of collod-
ium and resembled modern nega-
tives. Later, a rival of Dagron's,
whose name was not disclosed, in-
vented the micropriat on which the
copies of the London Tirnes were
printed.
The original prints and negatives
are now part of the permanent col-
lections of the library.
Teaher Con ference
To fe HelId loday
Approximately 100 representatives
of the science departments of high
schools in southern Michigan are ex-
pected to attend a conference on the
teaching of science in high schools
today in the University High School.
Speakers from Detroit, Dearborn,
Lincoln Park, Ann Arbor, Flint, and
Eden, New York high schools will be
featured in the panel discussions on
various phases of the high school
curriculum and methods of teaching.
Read and Use the
Classified Directory
Light Lunches
.SOUPS
...SALADS
... SANDWICHES
COKES
8:00 A.M.-10:30 P.M.
Weekdays
8:00 A.M.-12:30 P.M.
Friday-Saturday
Clark's Tea Room
217 Observatory

,P R I N C E S S E S-Bushba (left), 12, and Sirikiti, 14, daugh-
ters of Prince and Princess Nakkhatra of Siam, arrived in London
with their mother to rejoin their father, the Siamese minister.

A L L, - N A V Y TW IN S - Carolyn and Susan Yeager,
daughters of Dr. and Mrs. Douglas A. Yeager of Oklahoma City,
celebrated their first birthday anniversary on Navy Day. They
were born _while their father-wasa lieutenant commander.,-

C H 0 S E N-Nancy Drury, 4,
of Louisville has been chosen
national poster girl for 1947 and
her picture will be used during
the ,March of Dimes campaign
for polio sufferers.

T H A N KS IC IV I N C R OU ND U P-Herding turkeys on horseback in cowboy fashion en
a ranch near Phoenix, Ariz., are Mrs. C. W. Davis and Mrs. A. M. Sutton,

4

i

S I N C E R -- Opera singer
Grace Moore appears at a Lon-
don press conference in hat de-
sirned for her in Paris.

TH E K I N C S V I S I T -- Adm. Ernest J. King reaches for his glasses as Ernest H. King of
The Associated Press shows him a copy of the Honolulu Star Bulletin which used the AP man's pic-
ture with a story quoting the admiral. They visited at San Francisco where Ernest H. King, who was
Pacific Wartime Still Picture Pool coordinator, is recovering from an illness.

ITS COMING!

BIG

DAY

CAMPUS

NOVEMBER 6th

II See

Tuesday's Dailv

I1

I.,~ ~ A V ' 1 0 A LI &%A *- V AC V M r VIC i --

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan