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October 30, 1946 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-10-30

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PAGE TWO

THE MICH IGAN DIDAILY

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1946

I I

HEADACHES FOR ALL:
Increased Number of Classes
Makes Exam Scheduling Hard

Preparation of an examination
calendar this year has proved one of
the "most difficult revisions" to de-
velop in the return of the University
to a peace-time schedule.
Prof. Paul Dwyer, examination
schedi ling chairman of the literary
college, explained that the difficul-
ties he has encountered in prelimi-
nary work on the schedule stemmed
chiefly from the addition of noon, 4
p.m., 5 p.m. and evening classes to
the teaching program, and the in-
creased number of classes which will
be affected by requirements for de-
partmental examinations.
2 Examination Periods
In order to prepare an adequate
Alumni To See
Pres. Rutliven,
Niehuss, Today
Alumni in the Upper Peninsula will
greet President Ruthven and Vice-
president Niehuss upon their arrival
in Ironwood, Mich. today at the start
of a seven day speaking tour.
President Ruthven and Dr. Nie-
huss will visit "M" clubs for lunch-
eon and dinner meetings in Mar-
quette, Manistique, Newberry, Sault
Ste. Marie, Escanaba, and Menomi-
nee. Both men will address the "M"
clubs on the general subject "The
University in War and Peace." Dr.
Niehilss, in charge of public relations
at the University, will discuss for the
first time top secret work done in Ann
Arbor during the war.
President Ruthven and Vice-presi-
dent Niehuss will return from Sault
Ste. Marie on November 6. Arrange-
ments for the trip were made by John
Lemmer, president of the eleventh
district of the Alumni Association.
Read and Use The Daily
Classified Directory

schedule with a minimum of con-
flicts, Prof. Dwyer and Prof. Clarence
F. Kessler, examination chairman for
the engineering college, have had to
plan 22 examination periods over
eleven days starting Jan. 20. This
makes the total examination pe-
riod two' days longer than it was
before the war-time six-day sched-
ule was inaugurated.
These two days plus an extra regis-
tration day and two days added to the
between-semesters. period for ,filing
grades will make the fall semester
teaching schedule one week shorter
than before the war.
Because their programs are closely
inter-related, all schools at the Uni-
versity, with the exception of the
Law and Medical schools, follow the
same examination schedule. How-
ever, the engineering college decides
the length of its examination periods
independently, and is followed by the
architecture college.
Automatic Change
The literary college and schools
which follow its calendar will return
to three-hour examinations this se-
mester. Dr. Frank Robbins, as-
sistant to the president, said that this
change from war-time two-hour pe-
riods was adopted automatically when
the Conference of Deans voted in
Nov., 1945, to ereturn to the calendar
principles adopted by the Board of
Regents at the suggestion of the Uni-
versity Senate in 1928.
Prof. Kessler said that the period
length for the engineering college has
not been decided. He said that both
three and four hour periods have been
discussed at recent meetings of that
college's executive council, but that
a decision will not be announced un-
til the choice has been put before te
faculty.
Vets' Orchestra
To Be Formed
At Willow Run
Plans for the organization of the
Veterans Concert Orchestra at West
Lodge, Willow Village, were an-
nounced yesterday by Thomas E. Wil-
son, who will conduct the group.
The orchestra will be styled after
the radio concert type, capable of
playing both classical and modern
music.
Wilson is a former conductor of
the Army Air Forces Band and Sym-
phony Orchestra and the Hoosier
Symphony at Danville, Indiana. He
has studied with Thor Johnson and
is now studying with Prof. Wayne
Dunlap.
All veterans who play orchestra in-
struments are invited to the first re-
hearsal which will be held Sunday at
2:30 p.m. at West Lodge. In addition
to concert instrument performers,
saxophone players will be needed.
Today and Thursday --
OUR HEARTS WERE
GROWING UP
with Gail Russell, Diana Lynn
Brian Donlevy
and
THE SEVENTH VEIL
with James Mason, Ann Todd
North Main Opposite Court House
Starting Today ---

PLANS REUNION-Mrs. Ruth Buchanan, familiarly known as "Aunt
Ruth," will meet her "nephews," some of the 2,500 servicemen with
whom she corresponded during the war, a't a two-day reunion scheduled
to begin Friday.
* . . ',
FAMILY REUNION:
'Aunt Ruth's Nephews' To Hear
General at Two-DayGathering

Highlights
On Campus
IRA Meeting Postponed
To avoid conflict with AVC, the
meeting of the Inter-Racial Associa-
tion scheduled for today will be post-
poned until Nov. 6, Terry Whitsitt,
president, announced yesterday
The executive council of the IRA,
however, will meet at 7:30 p.m. today
in the Union to revise present plans
for the campus-wide FEPC Initiative
Petition Campaign to be sponsored
jointly with AVC, MYDA, and the
Lawyers Guild.
* ~* *
Elections To Be Held .. .
New officers of the Willow Run
Citizens Committee will be elected at'
8 p.m. today in the North Commun-
ity Building at Willow Village.
Reports of the voting registration
and the day nursery will be given. The
rent raise will be a topic for discus-
sion.
* *
Center Plans Party
Jack O'Lanterns, skeletons,
witches, black cats, and other Hal-
lowe'en decorations will lend atmos-
phere to the party for foreign stu-
dents and friends to be held at 7:30
p.m. tomorrow in the International
Center.t
Persons attending the party are
asked to dress in costume or old
clothes.
The regular Thursday afternoon
tea will not be held at the Center
this week because of the party.
Debate Squad Travels ...
A debate squad from Western Re-
serve will join a University squad in
presenting a series of exhibition de-
bates tomorrow, Friday, and Satur-
day in Michigan high schools.
Towns to be visited are Utica and
Flint, which will hear the exhibition
tomorrow, Howell and Ann Arbor,
which will hear it Friday, and Lan-
sing which will be visited Saturday.
Slosson To Speak.. .
Prof. Preston W. Slosson of the
history department will speak on
"International Issues in the Current
Election" at 8 p.m. today at West
Court Community Building at Wil-
low Village.
This is the third of the weekly lec-
ture series sponsored by the Univer-
sity for the residents of Willow Vil-
lage.
Tutor Cards Must
Be Filed at Union
Special cards which must be filled
in by students wishing to tutor or be
tutored in any subject are now avail-
able at the Uniton Student Offices.
Students are required to have a
grade of A in the course that they
plan to tutor. They will be asked tc
specify on the cards the course num-
bers in which they wish to give or
receive instruction

HELPLESS READERS:
High Pressure Methods Sicceed
In Foisting Garg Plug on Daily

ED13 OW' NOTE: While the editors or
he i aiy do not necessarily agree with
xiht M Ar. Logan has to say, they defend
with their iitmost hsis right to say it.
By PERRY LOGAN
"Now see here, Levine, this can't
go on." Ed McKinlay, managing edi-
tor of the Gargoyle, that humor mag-
azine that comes out Monday,
stomped up to the night editor's
desk.
Harry Levine looked up lazily from
his Ilistory of the Medieval Opera.
"How's that, scuttlebutt?" he asked.
Levine is a former sanior, and civilian
life is telling on him. "You were say-
ing..
"Yes, blast it. I was saying The
Gargoyle, our own campus humor
magazine, makes ins grand entrance
on campus Nlonday and nary a
nrd aboit it do I find in The
Daily., What kind of co-operation
is that?"
Levine vhIistled a few bars of Rigo-
letto. "Doe, Macy's tell Gimbel's?"
hec asked, facing the issue squarely.
"Realty MacFarland, old chap, in
The Daily colunis MYDA meetings
and Union banquets come first. We've
got no place for that drivel you've
been trying to foist upon us for the
last three night, . The Daily is not
just a publicity sheet, you know."
"It's something else besides,
maybe?" Mc'inlay asked naive-
ly. Tie succeeded in losing the po-
tential Garg sales to the entire
Daily staff. "Tlhe nan is obvious-
ly incoucitent was the way Le-
vine summed it up later. Tie bears
M-Kinlay no malice.

"One by Joan Vke on fores-
ters . .?
"Bob Hope said it first."
"Another about the atom bomb ..
"Saw it in the Technic."
"On football tickets . .".
"Collier's ran it."
"A murder case ...
"New Republic had it last week."
"One by Ray Shinn on . .."
"A rewrite on a My Weekly Reader
editorial," Levine sneered. "Wake up,
MacMaster. The campus has read all
that before. Give more Varga
girls and cocktAil rpes. We have a
hard enough time weckends as it is."
He polished his opera glasses. "Com-
plimentary tickets aren't what they
used to be, you know."
McKinlay offered Levine a free
pass to the Gard uffice. "It won't do,
MacArthur," Levine returned. "I go
for more intellectual stuff. Once a
PM fan, always a PM fan, I say Care
for' a shot?"
GadN (ihiteid lets
E. D. North, a student in the chemi-
cal engineering department was
elected president of the Graduate
Council at a meeting of the group
Monday.
Other officers include: vice-presi-
dent, Cameron Meredith; correspond-
ing secretary, Barbar'a Herman;
treasurer, D. A. Tyvner: and decording
secretary, W. W. Charters.



R :ER'S
STUDENT SUPPLIES
302 South State Street

Continuous from 1 P.M.
Last Times Today
FIESTA of FUN :
andMROMANCE!:
Evelyn KEYES
Keenan WYNN /''"
Ann MILLER
Allyn JOSLYN{ja...":5r ;;:" t ;
Starts Thursday
BEHIND THEr
WALLS LAY

By BOB BALL
Brig. Gen. Herbert C. Holdridge
(Ret.) of Washington, D. C. heads
the list of speakers who will be pre-
sented at a reunion of "Aunt Ruth"
Buchanan's war "nephews" to be
held on campus Friday and Satur-
day.
Mrs. Ruth B. Buchanan, an em-
ploye of the University Museums,
wrote more than 17,000 letters and
14,000 greeting cards to some 2,500
servicemen during the war. She also
wrote to 25 servicemen during
World War I.
Aunt Ruth has invited, not only
all her war nephews, but also the gen-
eral public, especially veterans, to
attend the reunion.
The Friday afternoon program at
the Rackham Building will present
two speakers: Lt. Dennis D. Nelson,
Center Club Sews
For European Relief
Foreign students or wives of for-
eign students who are interested in
sewing for European relief are in-
vited to join the sewing group which
meets from 2 to 5 p.in. every Tuesday
in the International Center.
Sponsored jointly by the Ann Ar-
bor Friends Meeting and the Inter-
national Center, the group mends
and repairs garments which are sent
to the American Friends Service Com-
mittee in Philadelphia which distrib-
utes the clothing in Europe.

USNR, a member of the first group of
Negro commissioned officers in the
Navy and former faculty member at
Fisk University, and the Rev. John
Harris Burt, former Navy chaplain
who is now director of student work
at St. Andrew's Episcopal Church,
Ann Arbor.
At the Saturday afternoon meeting
in Kellogg Auditorium Gen. Hold-
ridge will lead an open forum dis-
cussion on questions of interest to
veterans, including compulsory mili-
tary training and withdrawal of
troops from occupied countries.
Gen. Holdridge, organizer of the
Amvets, was the first of Mrs. Bu-
chanan's "nephews" in World War I.
In the last war his work as officer in
command of the Army Administra-
tion School of the Adjustment Gen-
eral drew praise from the military
and also from such columnists as
Dew Pearson.
Saturday night in Hill Auditorium
a public meeting will be held. Rev.
Burt will direct a short memorial
service, and brief addresses will be
given by Gen. Holdridge, a Navy
representative to be announced later,
and "Aunt Ruth" herself. Dr. Charles
H. Peake, assistant dean of the lit-
erary college will act as chairman of
the meeting.
After the reunion, Aunt Ruth plans
to turn over her entire collection of
letters, filling ten file cases and in-
cluding personal replies from such
men as Admiral Nimitz and General
Wainwright, to the Michigan His-
torical Collections.

icnIGAN

This: show Will be shown .continuously every day
through Supper Hour.
( r
30c Until
5O'clock
tExtra
and" "ARMY, FOOTBALL
NEWS CHAMPIONS"

: }
ti
r>
;t

NOW!

"Well, and what little goodies does IDiainonds
your precious Garg run this month?"
Levine asked, playing a Jimmy Dur-ad
ante record. o Wedding
"There's a wonderful article on C1Rings
Willow Run written by me," McKin- X
lay asserted.
"Stolen from Insight," Levine re- 717 North University Ave. .
torted., - ) -- O "Y<

RlS
J

CLASSIFIEDADVERTISING

FOR RENT

11

A COLUM8tA pMcUM
Coming
"I I'll[LUCKY,,

Johnny Mack Brown in
"TRIGGER FINGERS"
plus
Al. Pearce in
"ONE EXCITING WEEK"

Salvatore

BASSO-BUFFO
EXTRA
d CO NCE RT
Thursday, Dec. 5
8:30 P.M.

FOR RENT-A double room for men. 819
E. University. Call 2-1147. )52
WILL EXCHANGE new two-bedroom un-
furnished apartment in Detroit for nice
apartment in Ann Arbor. Call 2-3920. )6
DAY NURSERY
NURSERY SCHOOL-An experinced nur-
sery teacher will open her home to five
regular children between 3 and 4% yrs.
of age for five day week. Call 4865. )15
TAILORING and SEWING
CUSTOM MADE CLOTHES-Formals-Re-
modeling-Alterations. "Bring your sew-
ing problems to us." Hildegarde Shop,
116 E. Huron, 24669. )45
TRANSPORTATION
THREE GIRLS want rides to Grand Rapids
Friday afternoon. Will pay. Call Ellen
Mulvihill, 2-4561. )11
V~ V
'Dine in the Charming
Early American Atmosphere
Ea L of
0THE COLONIAL BOOM f

FOR SALE
WOMAN'S BICYCLE: Good condition, with
carrier, excellent tires. Phone 5519. )3
ENGLISH BIKES: Girl's Phillips and boy's
Humber. Three( eed. Call afternoon
4:30 to 6:00, at 727 So. Division. )10
NEED AN APARTMENT? Hi e a 2-family
house for sale which has ' ne apartment
vacant. Reasonable terms. Oril Fergu-
son, Realtor, 928 Forest Ave Phone
2-2839. )12
FOR SALE: Man's bicycP N ties. Good
condition. Call 2-6173 Ask r El'ke.)60
FOR SALE: Tuxedo, worn on twi', like
new. Stout 42. $45 - A_-- Niorthern
Seal Coat, Size18-20. xcl] o .ndi-
tion. Phone 8708, 414 K ugsk . )66
MISCELLANEOU
MIDWAY Bicycle shop, 32 " r.. - ty. We
have rebuilt used bikes for s ie. Your
bike can be expertly repaired also. )56
WANTED-
NEEDED: Source of Inspiration mminne.
Blonde, Brunette or Rcdne . all
2-4591, 112 Tyler. Ask fi Leon or Eddy.
)3
WANTED: Three tickets to MimeMich,
game. Phone Larry Strwtton a 4401.
)61

LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Woman's opal ring in a ruby set-
ting, last Saturday. Reward. Call Jim
Skipper, Lawyer's Club, 4145. )35
FOUND-Section 24, student coupon book
after Illinois game. Owner call 2-4988
and pay for ad. )4
LOST-Friday afternoon at P-Bell: Black
and Gold Parker Pencil, name inscribed.
Please call Milton Moscowitz, 4519. )7
LOST-A black Scottie dog answering
name Cinder. Some grey hair. Please
return or call. Mrs. E. G. Heisel, 632
Church. Phone 8825. teward. )21
LOST: Narrow rhinestone bracelet between
I-M Building and Union Saturday
night. Reward. Box 29, Daily. )1
LOST: Fur scarf. Two skins, stone martin,
at Illinois game. Reward. Phone 4328,
John E. Tracy, 24 Ridgway. )
LOST: Will whoever took ladies brown
gabardine topcoat from ladies lounge in
League evening of Friday, Oct. 25, please
return to League Information Desk?
This coat is part of a 3-piece suit and
valuable to owner. )62
LOST: Navy blue leather key case with
red binding and name "Ruth" in red
letters. Finder please call 25214 after
5:15 p.m. )30
HELP WANTED
TYPIST and General Office Work. Must
be accurate at figures. Call 9861. )9
STENOGRAPHER and general office work.
Must be neat and accurate. Call 9861. )8
FIVE PEOPLE, men or women, to call on
small merchants. Daily commissions.
Apply in person. Helpful if taking
bookkeeping or accounting. 538 N. Di-
vision. Income Tax Control Commission.
)48
GIRL or young lady to work at Soda
Fountain. Full or part time. Swift's Drug

OPENING TONIGHT at 8:30
THE DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH
presents
in.a
WITTY SATIRE
PRODUCTION National Politics
SE -

MEN'S USED CLOTHES wan ,ed. .
price paid. Sam's Store, 122 3
ington St.
BUSINESS SERVICES

better
Wash-
)14

ELECTROLUX VACUUM eLEANitS
Sales - John Jadwin - Servlce
855 TappaA Phone 2-7412 or 2 683
}41
TYPEWRITERS, office macines cie pned,
repaired. Work guarenteed, T reY *da
service. Calculators sold and rtnJ.
Pick-up and delivery. Office EDi u n ~

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