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October 20, 1946 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-10-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1946

A FACULTY FOR KNOWING:

'U' Boasts 'Typical Ph

;,

By HARRY LEVINE
EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the third ins
a series of weekly articles onf aentiy per-
sonalities.
Prof. William Frankena meets all
the popular requirements for a phil-
osopher.
He is tall, lean, almost ascetic-
looking and obligingly follows the
advice of fellow philosopher Vol-
taire and "cultivates his own garden"
Philosophy Flourishes
In a world filled with vocational
education and on-the-job training,
Prof. Frankena flourishes with the
largest philosophy classes in the
University's history.
Starting his education at Calvin
College in Grand Rapids and con-
tinuing at the University, Harvard,
Cambridge, and Dreiburg, he re-
turned here in 1937 as an instructor
in philosophy.
Lecture Team-mates
A novel educational turn developed
when Prof. Frankena combined
forces with Paul Henle, who was
then instructing the same courses in
philosophy, and formed a highly
successful team in which they chose
philosophical sides and gave joint
lectures.
It all began casually enough over
several glasses of beer at one of the
quiet downtown taverns, in the days
Business Short Course
The Short Course in Business
Management offered on campus last
semester by the Business Adminis-
tration has moved to Detroit under
the University Extension Service.
Special
Slipover Sweaters
$4.95 to $7.95 value
$ 3.98

7
PROF. WILLIAM FRANKENA
* * *
when there were quiet downtown
taverns in Ann Arbor.
Department 'Enthusiastic'
When they finally evolved what
BusAd Deans
o Meet Here
The classification and rating of
schools offering business instruction
will be the subject under discussion
when six deans of collegiate busi-
ness administration schools meet
Tuesday at the University.
Dean R. A. Stevenson, of the School
of Business Administration, is chair-
manof the committee.
Other members are Dean Richard
L. Kozelka, University of Minnesota;
Dean Herluf V. Olsen, Dartmouth
College; Dean Raymond E. Glos, Mi-
ami University; Dean L. J. Buchan,
Tulane University; and Dean Fay
Elwell, University of Wisconsin.

ilosopher'
was to e teirc oir leIture ystem
they pi esendhe idea to file pil
osophy department aid iwiead of
meeting the traditional resistance to
"new ideas," the department whole-
heartedly endorsed it.
"They were quite enthusiastic,"
says Prof. Frankena.
The war broke up the team and to-
day, with Heide at Northwestern,
Prof. Frankena delivers his lectures
in the standard fashion,
Eager Questioners
His lectures are informal and stu-
dents interrupt him frequently to
question him. In fact, it is not un-
usual to see six or seven students
waiting after class ready to pounce
on him with a seemingly endless
battery of questions. Often they ar-
gue right up until the time the class
immediately following Prof. Fran-
kenna's has occupied the room and
then the remainder of the would-
be philosophers track him out into
the hallway.
Sometimes, when the questioners
are numerous he is forced to hold a
last stand at the head of the stais
before disposing of the final one.
Home Life Quieter
His home life is a little quieter with
his wife and two sons, Carl, age 7
and Mark, age 3, although he is the
last to admit this.
"I have more trouble explaining
nursery rhymes to Carl than ex-
plaining philosophy to classes," hee
comments.
Win1.dsor Sc hool
S-ystem Vsted
Education Students
Muake Inspetion Trip
Resuming its pre-war practice of
initiating excursions to educational
institutes inside and outside the
country, the School of Education
last week sponsored a trip to Wind-
sor, Canada, to visit the elementary
and secondary school systems there.
The forty students in the intro-
ductory course in education who went
on the trip "were provided with a
sound basis for comparison of school
systems," according to Prof. Claude
A. Eggertson of the education school.
"The trip," he added, "also tended to
build pride in our own educational
system, and to build morale among
our prospective teachers."
The students visited an elementary
school and the Windsor Collegiate
Institute, which corresponds to our
high schools except that the Institute
has thirteen grades. The education
students visited classes and ob-
served student activities, including a
football game in the afternoon.
The Windsor trip is the first of
ten trips scheduled by the School of
Education for its introductory
classes. The others include visits to
a rural one-room school, a consoli-
dated school, and the Cassidy Lake
Juvenile Delinquency Camp.
VU' ilm .Secin.
In Nicaragua
"Michigan on the March," the
sound film ,describing the activities
of the University during wartime,
was shown Sept. 4 and 5 in Nicara-
gua, according to T. Hawley Tapping,
general secretary of the Alumni As-
sociation.
The film was attended by several
University alumni and by English In-
titute students who intend to study
in the United States.

The film, which is making a tour
of the Latin American and South
American countries, will soon be
shown in Caracas, Venezuela, and
Bogota, Columbia.

'STARVED FOR READING'
Willow Village Bernardo Tells
Plans Eventse roe
For This week Effect on Phili
By JOAN KATZ(s
icula are listed in the Willow If children wanted to read the con e I'
Village shedule of activities for the ics during the Japanese occupation
coniing week. of Manila, they queued up for a ten
At West Curt, married students' cent view, according to Prof. Gabriel th
social center: Bernardo of the library science de- m
.At 8 pm. tomorrow the theatre partment of the University of the a.
group will meet. They are working Philippines. li
g ro playsmBlt.heySpirt."wThre Prof. Bernardo, who has been in this in
Lfl tlne( play, "Blithe Spirit." There country since June working on a th
will also be a coffee hour for all the pognt r e wrkingfonth
3lufini~eof the University of JIll program of rehabilitation for the sa.
mn fu r f l war-wracked university, is here to de
eight-the University ex- consult with the faculty committee ni
tension class in Elementary Span- appointed by the Board of Regents S
isle will be held, and theWives after adoption of the Philippine uni-
slub will have a meeting versity by student vote last fall, th
Wednesday night, Prof. Harley H.Starvedor Readig ro
Bartlett of the botany department The rigid censorship exercised by bu
will speak on "Jungle Episodes." the Japanese military government v
Prof. Bartlett is a specialist in rub- left the Filipino people "virtually st
ber, and has spent two years in the starved for reading matter," Prof. wi
Southwest Pacific studying the Bernardo said. The few American
sources of rubber. magazines smuggled into Manila by tu
At 2 p.m. Thursday there will be guerillas in contact with U. S. sub- St
a lecture on pre-natal and child marines were "re-read to tatters," BE
care. The University extension he added. co
class in Elementary Psychology Books the Japanese classified as th
class will meet at 8 p.m. "against their military organization icy
l'riday night there will be a con- or against war and fascism," as well or
cert of classical recordings with com- as those "advocating the American th
mentary by Weldon Wilson.
At West Lodge, the single students
recreation center: make-up,m e
At 3:45 p.m. today a concert of
classical recordings is scheduled.
At 6:30 p.m. movies of the Army- wherever you show
Michigan game will be shown.
At 7:30 p.m. Wednesday the Wil-
low Village AVC chapter will meet to
hold an election for chapter offi-
Friday night another dance with
Jerry Edwards and his orchestra
providing the music is scheduled.

of Occupation
ppine Education.
sten of education or peace and de,
ioeiacy," were ordered destroyed.
By pleading that the reduction in
ie staff from 62 members to three
ade it impossible to fulfill the Jap-
nese requirements,,the university
brary, of which Prof. Bernardo is
charge, avoided compliance with
e order. However, most of the books
lvaged during the occupation were
estroyed in the reconquest of Ma-,
la.
tudent Body of 2,000
Despite the shortage of instructors,
e lack of equipment and of class-
om space (not one of the school
uildings escaped damage), the uni-
ersity is now functioning with a
udent body of 2,000, in comparison
ith the pre-war enrollment of 8,000.
A distinguished promoter' of cul-
aral relations between the United
Mates and the Philippines, Prof.
ernardo was originally sent to this
ountry as a technical assistant to
e Philippine Foundation of Amer..
a. He later was given charge of co-
rdinating all agencies trying to aid
e Philippine rehabilitation.

'Hello Moscow'
Will Be Shown
By Art Cinema
The second presentation of the Art
Cinema League will be the Russian
film "Hello Moscow" Thursday, Fri-
day, and Saturday at the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
"Hello Moscow" is the first post-
war Russian musical. Based on a
Soviet sponsored program for indus-
trial and dramatic training, the film
uses student actors who received
training under the plan. Russian folk
songs and dances-are featured in the
film, which is a departure from a long
series of documentary films put out
by the Soviet during the war.
"Hello Moscow" is directed by Ser-
gei Yutkevitch, well known as a di-
rector in Russia, and employs sev-
eral established stars in supporting
roles. It runs 84 minutes. and is sup-
plemented by a short musical, "Bay-
aderka Ballet."
Tickets for "Hello Moscow" may be
obtained at the Lydia Mendelssohn
box office beginning Wednesday aft-
ernoon. All performances begin at,
8:30 p.m.
Hold Your Bonds

Iii

a

a

I

MED COACH INN
now opens seven days a week.
A special businessman's lunch,
from 70c on up, is being served
between 11:30 and 1:30.

79c ANKLETS
49c apair
9 Nickels Arcade

r ,
Diamonds A
and
( Wedding
SINC - n~
- 13 RingsC
717 North University Ave. V

.... ...

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
10:00 a. m. Unitarian - Friends'
Church School.
10:00 a. m. Adult Study Group.
11:00 a. m. Service of Worship.
Rev. Edward H. Redman preaching
on "PEACE OF MIND".
6:00 p. m. Unitarian Student
Group. "Fundamentals of Unitarian-
ism".
Unity: Sunday services at 11
o'clock at Unity Reading Rooms, 310
S. State St. Subject, "Cautions in
Undertaking the Work of the
Christ."
Student Group will meet in Read-
Rocrms at 7:00 p. m.
First Church of Christ Scientist,
409 S. Division St.
Sunday morning service at 8:00.
Subject, "Doctrine of Atonement."
Sunday School at 11:45.
Wednesday evening service at 8:00.
The Lutheran Student Association
will meet at 3:30 Sunday afternoon
at the Parish Hall and leave from
there for an outdoor meeting and
picnic supper. In case of unfavorable
weather the meeting will be held in
the Parish Hall at the regular 5:30
hour.
Bible Hours at the Center at 9:15
on Sunday morning.
Church worship services will be
held Sunday morning in both Zion
and Trinity Lutheran Churches at
10:30.
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw:
Sunday service at 11:00 a. m. Ser-
mon by Rev. Alfred Scheips, "St.
Luke, a Professional Man and a
Churchman."
Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, will meet at the Center, 1511
Washtenaw Sunday at 5:15 for its
regular supper social meeting.

'/1

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