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October 19, 1946 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-10-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THL MI-CHIGAN DAILY

s.' 1AiED A OC-TOB .R 19, 1946

Campus Highlights

TASTELESS T-BONE :
Restaurant Owners Protest
City's Soaring Meat Prices

L

Hillel Plans Activities .
The B'nai B'rith HTllel Foundation
will hold open house followiX. the
football game today and tonight at
the Foundation.
Hebrew classes for beginning and
intermediate students will be offered
by the Classes Committee of the
Foundation.
Instruction for beginners will be
League Casbah
Features Ward
With New Cast
The Campus Casbah will be open
again from 9 p.m. to midnight in
the League Ballroom with a new
campus talent floorshow.
Harold Ward will be the master of
ceremonies and Frank Anderson will
play boogie-woogie accompanied by
the bass and drum, from the band.
Lynne Wohlgemuth will sing semi-
popular songs, accompanied by Ann
Schubring. Virginia Scott and Flor-
ence Zaratzian will do a jitterbug
dance, and Dorothy Beatty will sing
in Cass Daley style.
The Casbah is open to all Univer-
sity students. Cashiers receipts or
identification cards must be pre-
sented before tickets may be pur-
chased, which are sold at the League
desk.
Allan Townsend and his eleven-
piece orchestra plays for the Casbah
every weekend.
The recently chosen central com-
mittee for the Casbah includes Joan
Schlee, chairman; Carla Mullendore,
assistant chairman; Barbara Wil-
lfamson, finance; Marion Carleton,
publicity and Penny Klausner, floor-
show.
} Light Lunches
r $ ...SOUPS
*SALADS
SANDWICHES
COKE S
8:00 A.M.-10:30 P.M.
Weekdays
8:00 A.M.-12:30 P.M.
Friday-Saturday
Clark's Tea Room f
217 Observatory

given at 7:15 p.m. Thursdays and
for intermediates at 4:15 p.m., either
Tuesdays, Wednesdays or Thursdays.
VAA Swimmers Meet ...
The WAA Swimming Club will
hold its first meeting at 10 a.m.
today in the Union Pool.
The group wil swim each Sat-
urday morning throughout the
year, and will sponsor other spe-
cial events such as the intramural
swimming meet held this week.
Work will begin immediately on
a water ballet routine to be pre-
sented at the Union open house
later this fall. Louise Markhas
urges all those interested in swim-
ming activities to attend the open-
ing meeting. "Coeds should join
immediately to be eligible for such
programs as the water ballet," Miss
Markhas says.
* *
Polonia Society Picnic . .
Polonia Society will hold a picnic
at 5:30 p.m. tomorrow on the Island.
Those going on the picnic will meet
at 5:30 p.m. at the fountain in front
of the League.
Persons who expect to go on the
picnic should contact Henry Wolan-
ski at 2-4401. The picnic is open
to all students.
Schedule Breakfast Hike
A breakfast hike will be held at
7:30 a.m. tomorrow, sponsored by
the WAA Outing and Camp Coun-
sellers' Club.
The group will meet at the WAR,
and will proceed from there to the
underwater bridge, where break-
fast will be eaten. Those attend-
ing are requested to furnish their
own food.
Chriastian Science Talk. .
Lt. Col. Robert Ellis Key, of Lon-
don, England, will deliver a lecture
on "Christian Science, How It Can
Be Studied and Applied" at 3:30 p.
m. tomorrow in Lydia Mt.endelssohn
Theatre.

fv?

That long awaited T bone steak
ntuv no! ia e:,o ouod afie all.
Not mat4:171l a: i. IJi
AIR O7PA o1i i1 l ertuhat il I ysi
y01_ all AeJtions And an Ann
Arbor grocer who had 1maL reported
that T-bone steak is $1.10 a pound
and hamburger is 65 cents a pound.
Steak Prices Soar
Local restaurants which had steak
yesterday were charging between
$2.50 and $3.00 for a dinner. Other
meat dishes were also up in price
in all city restaurants.
A survey of Ann Arbor restaurants
indicated that all menu prices will
rise. One restaurant owner said,
"There's no other way out. We will
have to raise prices." Another owner
commented: "It is natural to assume
that if we pay more for meat, w
will charge more,"
Restaurateurs Protest
A few of the city's restaurant own-
ers, protesting the new high meat
prices, told The Daily that they
would simply not serve meat for
which they would have to pay ex-
orbitant prices and for which they
would have to charge "fantastic"
prices. In line with this, one owner
announced that he did not intend
to raise prics if he could possibly
avoid it by serving cheaper cuts of
meat. Another one said he hoped
that within a few months, prices
would level off, although, le added,
"they will never again in the near
future return to anything near OPA
prices."
The maximum OPA ceilings on
Grade A meat, before the controls
were taken off by President Truman
Monday, were as follows:

T-one steak: 59 cents a pound
HaibuIger: 29 cents a pound
t? 1h t oa~t : 40 et:, a poulid
1,0W lanilb hor ' T) cents a pound
Veal chops: 2 cents a pound
Bacon: 46 cents a pomd
Whole ham: 40 cents a pound
Boiled ham: 79 cents a pound.
Prison Officials
D iscuss School
E. L. Ragar and W. J. Toms, edu-
cational directors of the State Prison
of Southern Michigan, conferred yes-
terday with Dean James B. Edmon-
son and professors in the School of
Education on problems of elemen-
tary and secondary school curricula
as used in the prison's school.
The School of Education was ap-
proached by Ragar and Toms in an
effort to obtain a representative of
the school to conduct teacher-train-
ing program for the prison teachers.
The program is designed to provide
the teachers with the latest data in
classroom instruction. Arrangements
have been made for the program to
be established next semester.
i.

WHISTLING FOR A BREEZE-
Members of the Michigan Sailing
Club launch dinghies at Whitmore
Lake. The Club operates six din-
ghies, a sloop and. an iceboat.
(Daily Staff Photo)
Whiltmorea e ke
Breezes A ttrcwt
Siude.t Sailors

4

UNWANTED HAIR
Pemanently
lRemoved.?
Short wave method
Faster, Painless

Midwest Sailing
Will Be' Iormed

(ThIls
sooll

i,

NOW:
Manicurist Service
We are pleased to announce
EDNA COLE
Licensed,
Experienced Cosmotoligist
No Appointments Necessary
The Dascola Barbers
Liberty off State

.

i"l'

Students longing for the sea
breezes may well envy fresh water en-
thusiasts of tile Michigan Sailing
Club who descend upont Wltti. ile
Lake every windy day.
Unpublicized and, until recently,
almost alone in Midwest, the Michi-
gan Sailing Club operates independ-
ently of thetniveryity erom early
spring until winter ine malsailng
impossible.
Ice lakes No Iifference
At the present tiie t i Club pos-
sesses six dinghies asd a sloop do-
nated to it this summer. The addi-
tion of an iceboat may permit some
members to con tinue sailing all
through the winter. s
Only Midwestern member of the
Intercollegiate Yacht Racing Asso-
ciation, the Michigan Sailing Club
was founded in 1938 as an offshoot of
the Quarterdeck Society, naval arch-
itecture organization.
Because the Club has no University
backing its facilities are severely lim-
ited and all equipment and upkeep
expenses must be paid from club
dues.
Memberships Restricted
The limited equipment available
has made it necessary for the Club
to restrict its membership to 40. At
the present time there are about 125
names on the waiting list for admis-
sion to the Club.
.Fondest dream of Sailing Club
members is that some day sailing
may become an intercollegiate sport
at Michigan. The local Club has been
requested by the ICYRA to aid in
establishing other sailing clubs in
the Midwest and bring them into the
fold of the sailing brotherhood.
Michigan State, Northwestern, Illi-
nois and Wisconsin are reported to
be interested in establishing sailing
clubs.
Midwest Regattas
Establishment of other Midwest-
ern clubs would make it possible for
regattas to be held in Midwest. All
regattas noware held in the East,
necessitating long and expensive
road trips.
Despite inferior facilities and lack
of familiarity with the course, club
members managed to walk off with a
fourth place behind MIT, Harvard
and Coast Guard in the September
McMillan Trophy race at Marble-
head, Mass.
Hold Your Bonds

Band To Give
Housing Skit
At Half-Time
Even though the Federal Govern-
ment has decided to keep ceiling
prices on houses, the lid will cone
off today at the Northwestern-Michi-
gan football game when the Univer-
sity Marching Band forms various
types of dwellings.
Former G. L Elmer Zilch, a fic-
titious character, will be the protag-
onist in the band's half-time skit.
Just before the housing routine,
the band, conducted by William D.
Revelli and Assistant Director Har-
old Ferguson, will form a "Go-N-Go"
and play "Go Northwestern, Go" in
honor of the visiting team.
Northwestern's marching band will
also perform at half-time.
RED COACH INN
now opens seven days a week.
A special businessman's lunch,
from 70c on up, is being served
between 11:30 and 1:30.
STUDENT & OFFICE SUPPLIES
TYPEWRITERS
Bought, Sold, Rented, Repaired
0. B. MORRILL
314 S. State St. Phone 7177

z. .KRead and Use the1 Phone G3i73
Clssfid° iretry_ L first National Bldg.
x C assii~ed 'ffrec to.
FRANKLIN VILLAGE
00
IN lHE OLD TOWN HALL - FRANKLIN,, MICHIGAN
OCTI'OBER 25, 26, 27
BRING YOUR FRIENDS . . .. 11:00 A.M. to 10:00 P.M.
MAKE HER FAST, MATES - Frank Fruehauf and Lee Graves make AdEN S 20:
ready for sailing under the watchful eye of their Commodore, Ted Greer. Admission 25c
(Daily Staff Photo) y ;;> ;;;; .;; c;;; c;;;0 a;c4;;; > >;;; ;> ; <;;y ;;

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FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw
W. P. Lemon, D.D., James Van Pernis,
. Ministers
Frieda Op't Holt Vogan, Director of Music
Ruth Kirk, Church Worker
10:30 A.M.: Nursery, Beginner and Primary.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship. Sermon by Dr.
John Maxwell Adams of Philadelphia. Topic:
"Beyond Courage."
5:00 P.M.: Westminster Guild. Dr. Ada D.
Ames, Children's Director of the Probate
Court will speak on "Between the Gener-
ations." Supper follows.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Minister: Rev. Leonard A. Parr, D.D.
9:00 A.M.: Laymen's Breakfast at Mchigan
League.
10:45 A.M.: Public service conducted by laymen.
Address: Dr. James P. Adams, "Dividends
And Investment."
6:00 P.M.: Student Guild. Supper and election
of officers.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Rev. Alfred Scheips, Pastor (Missouri Synod)
Saturday, 4:30-6:00 P.M.: Open House after the
Game.
Sunday, 11:00 A.M.: Sunday service, sermon by
the pastor, "St. Luke, A Professional Man
and a Churchman," (St. Luke's Day, October
18).
Sunday, 5:15 P.M.: Supper Social of Gamma
Delta, Lutheran Student Club.
Wednesday, 7:30 P.M.: Bible Study Hour.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 East Huron
C. H. Loucks, Minister
10:00 A.M.: Student Class of the church school
meets in the Guild House to discuss "What
Can We Believe About Man?"
11:00 A.M.: Church Worship. Sermon: "A Per-
ennial Question."
6:00 to 8:00 P.M.: Roger Williams Guild. Sup-
per and discussion of "Prayer Changes
Things," Rev. Harold Richardson, Pastor of
First Baptist Church of Jackson, speaker.

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State
Ministers:
James Brett Kenna, Robert H. Jongeward
Music: Hardin Van Deursen, director
Mary McCall Stubbins, organist
Student Activities; Kathleen Davis, director
10:40 A.M.: Worship Service. Dr. Kenna's ser-
mon topic is "A Divided Loyalty."
5:30 P.M.: Wesleyan Guild. Student Panel on
"The Values of Campus Lfe." Social Hour
and Supper.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRISTI SCIENTIST
409 South Division Street
10:30 A.M.: Sunday Lesson Sermon. Subject
Oct 20 Doctrine of Atonement.
10:45 A.M.: Sunday School.
8:00 P.M.: Wednesday evening testimonial
meeting.
This church maintains a free Reading Room
at 706 Wolverine Building, Washington at 4th,
which is open daily except Sundays and holidays
from 11:30 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Here the Bible
and Christian Science literature including all
the works of Mary Baker Eddy may be read,
borrowed or purchased.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw
Edward H Redman. Minister
10:00 A.M.: Unitarian-Friends' Church School.
10:00 A.M.: Adult Study Group.
11:00 A.M.: Service of Worship. Rev. Edward
H. Redman preaching on: "Peace of Mind."
6:00 P.M.: Unitarian Student Group. "Funda-
mentals of Unitarianism."
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED CHURCH
T. R. Schmale, Pastor.
C. R. Loew, Assistant Pastor.
Kathryn Karch, Organist
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship. Sermon: "Clouds
of Witnesses." Rev. Loew will preach.
5:00 P.M.: Student Guild. Supper, fellowship,
and a discussion of "The Validity of Dem-
ocracy as Political Theory in the Light of
Christian Faith."

fig the AtI E,6N.EEI
. . for the very best food served in

72

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Need a Loan f or that

NEW CAR ?

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets
Harold J. DeVries, pastor
Phone 2-1129
10:00 A.M.: University Bible Class. Edward
Groesbeck, leader.
11:00 A.M.: "Opposing Forces."
12:45 P.M.: "Your Radio Choir" over WPAG.
6:00 P.M. Youth Hour.
7:30 P.M. The Censervative Reply - Salvation
- personal or social?
7:30 P.M. Wednesday. Mid-week service.

DON'T HESITATE! Why not come in and see us
about an automobile loan? We have loans at low bank

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division at Catherine
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:15 A.M.: High School Study Group.
9:45 A.M.: Confirmation Class.

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